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Simon. It's nice to know that we are of one opinion.
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People might actually pre-pay for a sexy E-type, low-drag coupe. This should have been made into a slot car long ago.
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Wheel Tire Car Vehicle Hood
 

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Didn't Revell make that low drag object of beauty? Or was it another, not-so-low low drag machine they did?

Whatever, I had one. The Revell. It was a small object of beauty. And ran like **** without the mugnut.

I should've shot it with the air rifle but must've sold it on eBay because I can't find it now.

Sadly, I suspect Simon's evil twin in Design would put an FF amidships if Scalextric did make it.

Say, why not silence Mr M and his A105 fetish by releasing a Warminster (sic) with an FF amidships? You would get shot of a few of those motors. 😁
 

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Simon. It's nice to know that we are of one opinion.
smile.png


People might actually pre-pay for a sexy E-type, low-drag coupe. This should have been made into a slot car long ago.
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1963 Jag low drag 3.jpg
If this is a period photo then the exhaust must be wrong on the later car...
 

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I have a George Turner XJS, and it's a very nice car to both build and run.

Wheel Tire Vehicle Car Motor vehicle

I've so got a less good XJR12

Wheel Vehicle Tire Car Motor vehicle
 

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Sometimes when things go wrong or are less than ideal, we have to stand back and take a holistical overview.
In essence the real reason BL cars were so bad was Tony Benn, he forced through the creation of BL which led to Donald Stokes, a truck and bus man at the helm.
The contribution of the workforce, I use the word work somewhat ironically was questionable at least.
When BL was formed the BMC new product cupboard was virtually empty, the only car to come pdq was the maxi, solid idea, a la Renault 16, remember having the corgi version, frumpy styling and a cable operated fivespeed boite vittese.
So in order to get a fleet type car out quickly, time was of the essence and funding in very short supply, the Marina had to be a parts bin special.
At the time the ageing, 1962,1100/1300 range was still selling at the sharp end of the charts, but unbeknown to BL the mk2Cortina, which the Marina was aimed at, was about to be replaced,mk 3 1970,very collectable today and move up half a class, hence the Marina which would have financially undercut the mk 2 Tina, was now pitched against the excellent and cheaper Escort mk1.
The Marina was only intended to be a stopgap car, so the use of a triumph 1300 gearbox, converted from fwd to rwd and Morris 1000 lever arm front suspension wasn't seen as a long term solution.
The 1.3 car was OK with the suspension, but the heavier B series 1.8 engine caused, what shall we say, handling issues, exacerbated by the Twin cam model, bet they're rare now.
Motor magazine and Auto car both tested the cars, their alarm at these handling issues meant they conferred their conclusions and had a meeting with Lord Leyland Atlantean Stokes and issued an ultimatum, sort the handling before release to Joe Public, or our road test write ups will tell the truth, the TC is bl**dy dangerous.
Stokes agreed, the write ups were softer, but many cars got out before a fix was productionised.
The coupe was designed with proper bigger doors, but budgetary constraints kicked that on the head.
The Marina was styled for the time, its motorshow70 launch was unfortunately missed, by the guy who had just left Ford for BL who had styled the Mk 2 cortina, that's why the clubman minis look like a Mk 2 Tina at the front, he left very quickly due to BL not accepting his platform sharing ideas, which make VAG so good today.
The original Harris Mann sketches for the Allaggro look great but problems of engine height put paid to that.
Finally bad as the Marina is viewed today, it was in the top three or four of the sales charts for the first four years of its life, its planned 76 total replacement was canned due to lack of finance, BL was rapidly going down the pan, too many factories stretches investment, product range too big to invest in, weak management and a somewhat left of centre workforce who demanded pay parity with Ford, who made good cars that sold well making profits, although Fords rusted as badly as BL, not to mention Rootes/Chrysler and Vauxhall.
So basically politics gave us lemons.
Back on track I'd like to see Simon and his team give us an updated mini clubman svp, many versions in the touring car championship and rallycross.
 

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Jim Moyes
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"so the use of a triumph 1300 gearbox, converted from fwd to rwd "

Apart from that bit, I agree with everything else.

The single rail gearbox was the one new mechanical component for the Marina. Everything else was from 40s/50s designs. Smaller range Triumphs were changed from the sturdy three rail unit to the single rail at around the same time, with the same (un)reliability issues. The uprated Standard 10 back axle wasn't man enough for the 1300 A-series, let alone the 1800 B-series.

If Maggie had got into power a decade earlier to deal with the unions, then we might still have a motor industry.
 

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Ah, the dependable Austin Maxi. My Dad had two. With a dinghy on the roof and a caravan on the tow hook they took us everywhere on continental adventures. He managed to get the 'van stuck in a Monaco side street once, as the buildings closed in and forced the Maxi to a halt.

I've an original sales brochure somewhere. It has a shot with a "Gentleman's magazine" on the parcel shelf.🤔

Different times....

As you were.
 
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The 1.3 car was OK with the suspension, but the heavier B series 1.8 engine caused, what shall we say, handling issues, exacerbated by the Twin cam model, bet they're rare now.
The TC wasn't a twin cam, it was a twin carb engine, imported pretty much straight from the MGB.
 

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I had a Marina, Red and rust spots every where which I treated with that rust treatment that 'converted' the metal and left black spots everywhere. Crumpled the FNS wing and after hammering it out had headlight behaving like a searchlight so I just 'fixed' it in place using a couple of those long bendable car radio rear brackets screwed to the headlight mounting plate and the outside of the wing. passed two MOT like that, simpler times. Mine was an auto with lots of engine brakes when locked in 2nd, never used the brakes on the couple of steep hill where I lived then. I think I actually enjoyed my Marina time.

Never had a Jag, but for a slot car for me a Mk1, Mk2 or XK150
 

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Circuit Owner
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I had a Marina TC fastback. Handling was entertaining in the wet - you learned about opposite lock pretty quickly. It was OK in the snow if you put 3 or 4 breeze blocks in the boot along with your shovel. Early 80s had some epic winters in the West Country and my Marina was driven on packed snow for several weeks without mishap. Young people give up in the white stuff nowadays - they just dont know how to drive in it. Our carp cars of the 70s and 80s taught us how to get the best out of a bad car and taught us mechanical sympathy for sure.
 

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the purple fastback marina with cream interior i had was a great car below 30mph

but anything above that speed and the rotten wings became real wings and if not careful would have removed pedestrians lower legs at the knees

and it must have been the fastest car on the motorway ... nothing over took me !

alas Mr Plod eventually noticed

and no insurance , tax or mot resulted in a 6mth ban and £300 fine

ahhhhh ......... the good old days
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1960s/1970s cars worked better on snow than modern cars. Modern wide tyres have fantastic traction on a hard surface, but none at all on snow or wet grass. Typical 60-70 HP from those cars was much easier to control on a slippery surface than today's typical 150 -200 HP, too.

I remember driving my 1978 Vauxhall Chevette up some crazy hills in deep snow in South Wales and my 1981 Austin Metro would go anywhere until the snow got too deep for the small wheels. My modern BMW with its Eco-tyres got stuck last year on some wet grass in a car park......if it snows, I stay home.

Mike
 
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