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Discussion Starter · #1 ·


I've come across a couple of 1/32 Ford GT Mk4 bodies. They look great and I can't eait to paint them. The BIG question is does anyone have any suggestions on what chassis to put these on? Thanks, Bob
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
QUOTE (Bob @ 7 Feb 2004, 04:51 PM)


I've come across a couple of 1/32 Ford GT Mk4 bodies. They look great and I can't eait to paint them. The BIG question is does anyone have any suggestions on what chassis to put these on? Thanks, Bob
Can't wait is what i meant to say. Sry
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
QUOTE (Nico @ 7 Feb 2004, 05:11 PM)I would go for a SCHÖLER or a PLAFIT 1/32 chassis as they are adjustable (wheelbase and the heigth of the axels).

Only personal preferance!!!!

Nico

Grenzlandslot
I'll go find a Plafit. I was initially trying to figure out if a RTR Fly or MRRC would fit. Thanks, Bob
 

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If it helps at all, and it IS that beautiful LeMans Miniatures Ford mkIV you have, it will go on an MRRC inline chassis- the one for their Chaparral or Ferrari 275 is spot on for wheelbase etc., but then you can't use a full interior of course. The only sidewinder RTR that would go from amongst the cars I have, is the Scalextric GT40, but you'd have to do a fair bit of adapting. I don't have the Fly version, but I understand the dimensions are different from the Scaley car. The Fly Ferrari 512 is fine lengthwise but too wide, so you'd need to work at the rear axle set up as well as trimming the chassis itself.
If you're not bothered about a full cockpit- and in a closed car it doesn't bother me too much, I must say, the MRRC Clubman chassis is another favourite of mine. That will fit practically anything. It's very adaptable and amenable to tuning.
Otherwise.... build your own. It's fun!
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
QUOTE (howmet tx @ 7 Feb 2004, 07:49 PM)If it helps at all, and it IS that beautiful LeMans Miniatures Ford mkIV you have, it will go on an MRRC inline chassis- the one for their Chaparral or Ferrari 275 is spot on for wheelbase etc., but then you can't use a full interior of course. The only sidewinder RTR that would go from amongst the cars I have, is the Scalextric GT40, but you'd have to do a fair bit of adapting. I don't have the Fly version, but I understand the dimensions are different from the Scaley car. The Fly Ferrari 512 is fine lengthwise but too wide, so you'd need to work at the rear axle set up as well as trimming the chassis itself.
If you're not bothered about a full cockpit- and in a closed car it doesn't bother me too much, I must say, the MRRC Clubman chassis is another favourite of mine. That will fit practically anything. It's very adaptable and amenable to tuning.
Otherwise.... build your own. It's fun!
A big help! Would you mount it by relocating screw posts?
PS: I And I think I saw the Howmet TX race at Marlboro MD in 1968.
Bob
 

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If it helps at all, and it IS that beautiful LeMans Miniatures Ford mkIV you have, it will go on an MRRC inline chassis- the one for their Chaparral or Ferrari 275 is spot on for wheelbase etc., but then you can't use a full interior of course. The only sidewinder RTR that would go from amongst the cars I have, is the Scalextric GT40, but you'd have to do a fair bit of adapting. I don't have the Fly version, but I understand the dimensions are different from the Scaley car. The Fly Ferrari 512 is fine lengthwise but too wide, so you'd need to work at the rear axle set up as well as trimming the chassis itself.
If you're not bothered about a full cockpit- and in a closed car it doesn't bother me too much, I must say, the MRRC Clubman chassis is another favourite of mine. That will fit practically anything. It's very adaptable and amenable to tuning.
Otherwise.... build your own. It's fun!
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
QUOTE (howmet tx @ 7 Feb 2004, 11:12 PM)If it helps at all, and it IS that beautiful LeMans Miniatures Ford mkIV you have, it will go on an MRRC inline chassis- the one for their Chaparral or Ferrari 275 is spot on for wheelbase etc., but then you can't use a full interior of course. The only sidewinder RTR that would go from amongst the cars I have, is the Scalextric GT40, but you'd have to do a fair bit of adapting. I don't have the Fly version, but I understand the dimensions are different from the Scaley car. The Fly Ferrari 512 is fine lengthwise but too wide, so you'd need to work at the rear axle set up as well as trimming the chassis itself.
If you're not bothered about a full cockpit- and in a closed car it doesn't bother me too much, I must say, the MRRC Clubman chassis is another favourite of mine. That will fit practically anything. It's very adaptable and amenable to tuning.
Otherwise.... build your own. It's fun!
It's a great fit; it might actually be ready to run tonight . Thanks again. Bob
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
QUOTE (howmet tx @ 8 Feb 2004, 10:40 PM)Do you suffer from Deja Vu, too?
Must be the turbine. Bob
 

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I think you may be right Bob. That or the blowback.
But did you get it running last night?

I have a little wrinkle (only my wife knows where it is. At least she thinks she's the only one...) about body mount posts. To get the ride height JUST RIGHT I use two bits of plastic tubing from the model shop, the smaller one just big enough to take the fixing screw, and the larger one a sliding fit over the top. That way, with a bit of fiddling, you can screw the telescoping tubing onto your chassis then super glue the mounts into the body, and slide the mounts up and down until you have the shell sitting EXACTLY where you want it with minimum wheel clearance, etc. Then super glue the tubing solid. Or put a dab of epoxy in there while you adjust the height and leave to set. After all that you need to brace the mounts with lots of resin or plasticard, and put a collar round the thin tube to hold the fixing screw firmly....DOH! this is suddenly sounding very complicated. It isn't. It works.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
QUOTE (howmet tx @ 9 Feb 2004, 09:22 AM)I think you may be right Bob. That or the blowback.
But did you get it running last night?

I have a little wrinkle (only my wife knows where it is. At least she thinks she's the only one...) about body mount posts. To get the ride height JUST RIGHT I use two bits of plastic tubing from the model shop, the smaller one just big enough to take the fixing screw, and the larger one a sliding fit over the top. That way, with a bit of fiddling, you can screw the telescoping tubing onto your chassis then super glue the mounts into the body, and slide the mounts up and down until you have the shell sitting EXACTLY where you want it with minimum wheel clearance, etc. Then super glue the tubing solid. Or put a dab of epoxy in there while you adjust the height and leave to set. After all that you need to brace the mounts with lots of resin or plasticard, and put a collar round the thin tube to hold the fixing screw firmly....DOH! this is suddenly sounding very complicated. It isn't. It works.
Hi. Good description which I'll follow up on. I was trying to make some tabs so I could use the pre-existing side posts on the body. The tabs were not pleasing so your suggestion is the ticket. I know once this project is complete Exoto or someone will release all four Le Mans MK.4's and that'll be that.

Thanks, Bob
 

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I approach body mounting posts a little differently: I use plastic tubing as well, choosing a size that I can bore out a bit to take knurled metal inserts to suit the body mounting screws. (I use 2-56 machine screws.) I cut the tubing too long, press the screw inserts in place with a hot soldering iron and then fasten the post to the chassis with the machine screws.

I set the body on the chassis and then gradually grind down the free end of the posts until the body is setting properly. When I am satisfied (and, BTW, in the grinding process I try to shape the end roughly to the contour of the body surface) I tack them in place with CYA and then, removing the screws and chassis, reinforce the body/post joint with gussets set in epoxy.

In some cases, where ground clearance permits, I use a plastic shouldered bushing sized to fit the screw. The mounting hole in the chassis is drilled about 1 mm oversize for the barrel of the bushing and the bushing is cut so the barrel is about 0.5 mm longer than the chassis is thick. I can then snug up the mounting screws and still maintain a little "rattler" movement between the body and the chassis. The overbore and length can be adjusted to give any amount of freedom that one desires. This method requires that the initial adjustment of the post length allows for the length of the bushing barrel.

EM

EM
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
QUOTE (Ecurie Martini @ 9 Feb 2004, 04:01 PM)I approach body mounting posts a little differently: I use plastic tubing as well, choosing a size that I can bore out a bit to take knurled metal inserts to suit the body mounting screws. (I use 2-56 machine screws.) I cut the tubing too long, press the screw inserts in place with a hot soldering iron and then fasten the post to the chassis with the machine screws.

I set the body on the chassis and then gradually grind down the free end of the posts until the body is setting properly. When I am satisfied (and, BTW, in the grinding process I try to shape the end roughly to the contour of the body surface) I tack them in place with CYA and then, removing the screws and chassis, reinforce the body/post joint with gussets set in epoxy.

In some cases, where ground clearance permits, I use a plastic shouldered bushing sized to fit the screw. The mounting hole in the chassis is drilled about 1 mm oversize for the barrel of the bushing and the bushing is cut so the barrel is about 0.5 mm longer than the chassis is thick. I can then snug up the mounting screws and still maintain a little "rattler" movement between the body and the chassis. The overbore and length can be adjusted to give any amount of freedom that one desires. This method requires that the initial adjustment of the post length allows for the length of the bushing barrel.

EM

EM
Hi. Appreciate the response; I'm just trying to be sooooooo careful so I don't mess up the Mk.4 body. Mostly any other body I would have tried two or three things already.
Bob
 
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