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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all. Long time lurker, just started posting recently.

I've raced modern 1/24 cars for about 4 years now and I am just getting into the vintage scene. I've picked up a few cars that have lexan bodies that are for the most part intact, with maybe one of two small (less than 1/4") tears in them. What are the popular methods for making a repair? For my regular race cars, I'd use a nylon packing tape, but considering that these bodies are 40 years old with 40 year old paint, I'm curious if there's a better way to fix the tears.

I did a seach on the topic and didn't see anything posted already, but if I missed something existing I'm sorry for the exta post.

Thanks ahead of time for any ideas.
 

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Tony
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You can buy self adhesive lexan strips to reinforce the inside of the bodyshell, several companies make them but I use Parma

Tony
 

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Morning Kazooracer, bigtone is right about this tape it is reinforced and i have been using this type for nearly 50 years and my anglia from 1968 is still with us due to this tape, the last lot i bought was from S,C,D Chas Keelings place in Bradford, try S,C,D Homepage on line and see his lists Cheers Keith.
 

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I use the nylon strapping for the sides of the body where the pins go. it adds tremendous strength to the shell. I never knew they did self adhesive lexan. Ive got a few shells that need repairing and this sounds just the ticket, funny how you never stop learning. john
 

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Kazoo,

The other thing is, are these shells really Lexan? Before 1970 or so, there's a chance they'd be in butyrate, a different material: that would apply to all the Lancer, Russkit and other clear bodies of the time.

For these bodies, if it's a clean split, I use either "crystal" clear, fast-setting epoxy, or Ambroid Pro-Weld. Lexan would probably need its own type of glue. And the self-adhesive strips sound good too - had never heard of these either.

Don
 

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They're sold as 'body armour' from a few sites, Don. The Parma stuff is as good as any other.

I was about to remark on the likelihood that 40 year old bodies were not actually Lexan. Another side of this is that without the self-etching properties of modern polycarbonate specific paints, the strong adhesive employed on body armour might well pull some of the vintage paint away before it reinforced the body split.
Don's glue suggestions might be the best way forward.

Regards,
L.
 

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If the body is not for serious use but to be kept as an original I have used a hot glue gun with good results.
Works well for splits in corners on either butyrate or polycarbonate [not the silly thin *** paper ones though] , lay a bead of hot glue then wait a few seconds then smear the bead over the split with your finger, a good resistance to pain is a help!
Holds quite well as its a flexible repair, however make sure the paint is well keyed to the surface or the glue will peal off with the paint.
Good luck.
[oneofwos]
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Wow, what a wealth on information in one day's time!


Again, my lack of knowledge led me to incorrectly describe the bodies as being made of lexan when they really are made of a much thicker but still clear material. So butyrate is the correct term?

I do use nylon strapping tape on my modern cars to reinforce the pin holes but was concerned over using it on 40 year old paint, but once I've touched up the paint on one of the bodies I'll give it a shot. I do have one local hobby shop that deals in R/C and will give them a check this week to see if they have the lexan tape that was mentioned. But I do have one crack in a corner that I think the hot glue suggestion will be better suited for.

Thanks to all who responded to my request for help. I can see that I'll be hanging out here more in the future.
 

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You could also use a product called Shoe Goo to reinfore the cracked areas. It's a rubber type material, similar to silicone caulk, that remains flexible when dry. Tubes of it will be found in some shoe stores, some hardware stores, & online places such as Amazon. A large tube will cost $5-6.
 
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