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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am considering lubricating track slots and/or car guides. I can envisage no obvious reason why I should not, but before I do something which I may regret, does anyone do this, are there any problems?

You may ask why I should want to do it, the slots in my outdoor track are getting very dry, particularly in this prolonged dry weather, and the guides sometimes stick. I know that I could perhaps slim the guides down, but that will weaken them. Some cars are affected more than others and without putting a micrometer on the guides I can see no reason for the differing performance. I would anticipate using something like silicon grease. This is one of the lesser problems which I have to overcome with this project.

Observations and experiences welcome.
 

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QUOTE my outdoor track are getting very dry, particularly in this prolonged dry weather, and the guides sometimes stick

Is the track Ninco by chance?
Ninco track is famous for, over time, having the slot become thinner. This is when the guides start "sticking". By running a coin through the tight areas and giving it twist, the slot usually opens back up again.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
No Dickie, its Scalextric Classic copper taped. I have a nylon former which I run around to maintain slot width. The rain and damp seem to 'wash' it, the sun dries it, and occasionally friction just binds it all up, not necessarily always at the same spot. I have checked the width, and for obstructions.

I also have a wider routed track which I am also evaluating as an outdoor track, lovely free movement but with the extra width I occasionally loose contact, even with the braids splayed.

It would be less frustrating and perhaps even cheaper to start racing on a scale of 12 inches to the foot.
 

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QUOTE It would be less frustrating and perhaps even cheaper to start racing on a scale of 12 inches to the foot.

Snap out of it, man!
A race motor for an MGB in vintage racing can easily run $12,000. That would buy a lot of Scaley stuff!

Have you considered wax in the slot? Might collect less dirt than grease.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I must try to get some of this mysterious INOX, has anyone identified a UK source yet?

Does one need cars, track, controllers and electricity with it or does it do everything?
 

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hi guys, slightly off topic but my ninco track suffers from the plastic insert in the slot closing. ive tried every thing i can think of including putting a slightly thicker piece of copper 6-1in in the slot and heating it with a blow torch and letting it cool in the slot. no effect, any one had similar problems and cured it. any sugestions would be more than appreciated. the track is permanently fixed down and has been sanded flat and gloss coated for magless racing, two lane grey top. thanks john.
 

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The mysterious INOX is just stainless steel, from 'inoxidable' or unoxidisable. Carrera track claims to be 'ni-rust' (or something like it) which means the same. However it advises NOT using outside - who knows why.
 

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QUOTE (John Tremelling @ 21 May 2011, 11:51) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>I must try to get some of this mysterious INOX, has anyone identified a UK source yet?

Does one need cars, track, controllers and electricity with it or does it do everything?

It is amazing stuff but, yes, you will still need cars, track, controllers and electricity. It's not that good.


QUOTE (aerodynamic @ 21 May 2011, 12:45) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>The mysterious INOX is just stainless steel, from 'inoxidable' or unoxidisable. Carrera track claims to be 'ni-rust' (or something like it) which means the same. However it advises NOT using outside - who knows why.

No, INOX is the trade name. It just happens to be the same word for stainless steel in Italian. Carrera track uses stainless steel rails instead of plated steel. I guess the advice relates to the plastic maybe becoming (even more) brittle in the sun.
 

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Inox is, as Graham says, the brand name. MX3 is the formulation. Candan Inustries is the company. MX3 is a (very) light weight, food grade lubricant. Will serve as protection and dressing for the rails on the track. The plastic would also require some form of protection from UV damage, I would think.
 

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One small point, Inox may not be good for rubber so keep it off the tyres as much as possible. I've had no problems though.

Tip No 12,456,395
When I race at other tracks in the area I add a drop of Inox to my braids. You don't want to wipe the whole track and give your competitiors an unfair advantage, do you?
 

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Thinking of the original question - lubrication may help corrosion but have you considered expansion? Corrosion should be easy to spot, expansion may be less easy. Many people think the James May Toy Story expansion problem is it when it comes to expansion, but if you've pinned your track down and it cannot expand longitudinally it's gonna go the other way i.e. into the width.

As to the effect of sunlight on the plastic track. Most plastics in their raw form are white or transparent, to get a colour pigments are added, which in the case of black is usually carbon/graphite. This carbon blocks sunlight from the inner layers so any damage is usually limited to the exposed surface rather than the entire thickness of the molding.
 

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ZITAT(stoner @ 22 May 2011, 06:54) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>hy guys, dissapointed that none of you master builders have,nt a fix or suggestion for the ninco slots. john.

Hi John,

I thought the discussion wasn't about Ninco.

However, the fix is quite easy:

First: Use Ninco guide-blades or narrow existing guides-blades to the width of the Ninco guides. I do this regularly and never had broken a guide.

Second: The slot sometimes narrows at the junction points.
This is due to the u-shaped conductor. Sometimes the open ends of the "U" widen and narrow the slot.
In that case I take a screwdriver to bend the ends back to form a right-angled "U" again.
For old track this also increases conductivity at junction points. So extra bonus.


Hope this helps,

Regards,
Diegu

...Edit: Just saw your original question. Sorry I missed that one.
 

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thanks diagu, no it was,nt about ninco slots, scrapped car engines ,the price of new racing 1-1 engines, cleaning the rails, expansion of joints or lubricating the rail tops with inox. the guy wanted advice on treating the inside of his slots and lube for his guide flags john.
 

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To piggyback onto Ember's suggestion:
3M Silicone Dry Lubricant

Also, I wonder if this little trick I tried with my routed track might help. Because of my shaky routing abilities, there were some kinks in the slot, usually points where curves transition to straight. Once taped, I noticed some cars would bind, and some would catch on the kinks. I got a scrap of ABS sheet 2 inches by about 7 inches, and just over 1mm thick (I'm sure plasticard would work) and put some self-adhesive 180 grit sandpaper on it. The sandpaper was applied folded over one long edge, and cut flush with the other long edge, so that I have a single sided and a double sided slot-truer. I run this plastic strip through the slot, and where it binds up, I run it back and forth to open the slot up just a hair. I've ironed out the sticking points using this method.

Seems the dry lube would help to as long as you mask off the track surface.
 
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