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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've found a group that does some racing in the area. Looks like most of their racing is on wooden, routed tracks with copper slots.

I'm going to go and observe tonight and take a couple of cars along to play around with. All the cars I have include magnets. I haven't raced a slot car in a long time and, then, magnets weren't used.

Are cars with magnets balanced well enough to be competitive on a non-ferrous track? Or, do they often require additional weight or weight somewhere else in order to perform well? That is, is the magnet placed where one might place a weight.

I know that where the weight or the magent is placed is dependent on the car and the track... but my question is in general terms.

The specific cars I plan on taking are a Scalextric Audi TT and a Scalextric Porsche 911. They are both stock, exactly as they were right out of the box. Maybe I should take some tape and a few flat washers along... just in case.

Thanks.



Mike
 

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Hi Mike,

I recommend taking your ninco Porsche along too...

The basic chassis is well setup for wood tracks. I'll admit the NC1 motor isn't going to win any speed records, but just get used to the car, then, upgrade the motor. Get advice from the locals on what setup tips work best on their track, but most importantly, HAVE FUN!!


-Rob
 

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A few generalised comments

Magnets so magnificently cover up almost any and all flaws in a car, that it is impossible to forecast the detail of what might happen when the effect is removed.

One of the most obvious series of factors that are likely to emerge are non-roundness of wheels and tyres or slightly bent axles. Weight is unlikely to do anything to alleviate these problems.

Another is a tendency to deslot easily. This could be due to quite a few factors that magnetic grip can cover up, ranging from sloppy guide posts to unsuitable (too springy) pick-up braids.

Very generalised is a lilkelihood that around 5 grammes weight towards the nose will help keep the front end planted, with the likelihood of another 5 grammes mounted anywhere from the centre backwards where it will help to smooth out the rear end.

If you are lucky enough to find you have a car with none of the common basic faults mentioned, or any others, you MIGHT just find that the car runs well anyway! Of course you can do all the well-know prep work to the car to ENSURE that it has none of those faults and, ideally, you should do that anyway. But I would strongly advise being prepared, with a pocket full of lead and suitable adhesive, to be on the safe side.

This is incredibly generalised and will likely attract a lot of disagreement, but I can handle that just fine!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks Tropi. Generalised or not, sounds like sound advice to me.
Metal washers seem like an easy way to add weight. I'll have to see which ones might weigh around 5 grams.


Mike
 

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Hi Mike

I have a routed track and race some RTRs on them... What Tropi said is mostly correct..... The magnets tend to hide many of the faults in the RTR's cars...

More than likely you will need to add some weight...... how much depends a lot on the car you are setting up and how you dirve.... I would start by putting some just behind the guide under the front axle if you have the room....

the other thing you might need is a deeper guide.... Slot-it makes a very nice routed track guide that is a drop in replacement for most of the RTR's.... The deeper guide along will be a big help.....

try to make sure your wheels and tires both front and rear are as round as possible..... if they allow them I would go with a set of Slot-it wheels or BWA wheels on the rear.....

The best thing to do is ask questions, and see what set ups the guys are using and then work form there... Check and see what kind of tires they are running too...

On my track I use only sponge tires..... but that is for my track... I have had fairly good luck with the PPR tires or the Ortman tires....

I have a article on what I do to my RTR cars for my routed track that may or may not help..... http://jbriggsk9.tripod.com/chrisbriggsslotcarpage/id7.html

Chris
 

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Gary Skipp
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Scalex cars without magnets aren't generally a good ideea as they are too tail happy and have no brakes.

Your ninco porsche owuld be your best bet.

Weight distribution:

If it sides too much, weight in the center or to the rear.

If it de-slots too much, weight at the front.

Good luck
 

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Mike, I would guess that both of your Scalextrics are sidewinders and therefore could use about 1/4oz of weight just behind the guide. The Nincos seem to be pretty well balanced out of the box, although the NC-1 cars may still need a little nose weight. I find that 55-70% of the weight on the rear axle is a pretty good set up for non mag running. I like using the stick on tire weights and many tire shops will give you a strip or 2 for free. Have fun!
 

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My Carrera Plymouth Superbird is a fun drive on a copper routed track. The car has its magnets fitted, but no extra weight. Tyres trued but thats about it
yes it slides but thats part of the fun
So try a mag car with the bits trued & glued and see.


Mark.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I took the Ninco Porsche and quickly added some weight in the form of metal washers where the magnet is and to the rear of the car. It was all experimental and I didn't want anything permanent or hard to remove, so I just used Elmer's glue to hold down the washers in the rear.

I only ran in the warm-up session, as it was my first visit to the club and I wanted to observe, help out, and socialize a bit.

The Ninco was fun to drive. The rear end slid out like crazy, which was fun. To get some better handling I'll need more weight in the rear. And the de-slotting question was answered. It never de-slotted arbitrarily. So, the problem on the commercial track was with the slot depth on the Scalextric classic track... nothing inherent in the basic car.

The lack of top end speed with the NC-1 motor wasn't so much of a drawback on the shorter club track. (About a 12 foot straight and the rest kinks and curves.)

The Scalextric Audi TT also looked promising. I tested it out in strictly stock condition. Good zip on the straights. Fast acceleration and good top end. Very little sliding. Tended to tip out of the slot when trying to ratchet up the speed -- or misjudging -- on the sharper curves. I think a little weight in the front and mid-section will make this a nicely competitive car and fun for my tastes. Must check though. The gears sounded harsh, where they have not before.

The Scalextric Porsche 911 didn't do badly. A lot of the backend kicking out. Fun to run around the track.

Mike
 
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