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I've just finished laying down the grass for my track and now want to add some trees. However, I can't think of a way to make them!! Please help.

Thanks very much
Joe
 

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You will need green hairy string and gardening wire, both available form B&Q

Cut hairy string into pieces (about 60 per tree) long enough to be two branches of a coniferous tree

Take a piece of gardening wire more than twice as long as you want the tree to be high

Fold piece of wire in half

Put pieces of string in fold of wire, with the wire half way along the string

Now twist wire until the result looks like a tree

Or try searching google like I did for a better explanation
 

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Hi Joe, Google "d.i.y. model railway trees". You will find so many ideas it's crazy. Railroaders do some amazing amounts of landscaping. I guess watching trains gets boring compared to slot racing... zoom zoom zoom!
 

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QUOTE (PGG @ 12 Aug 2011, 16:39) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Hi Joe, Google "d.i.y. model railway trees". You will find so many ideas it's crazy. Railroaders do some amazing amounts of landscaping. I guess watching trains gets boring compared to slot racing... zoom zoom zoom!

I couldn't disagree more


http://www.google.co.uk/#sclient=psy&h...920&bih=955

About a trillion results ^^^
 

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Tore
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When ready made trees cost up to 20-30£ each for the large ones, I've decided to make my own trees. So I've been searching for a method of making lots of large pine trees quickly and at a low cost, and I'm currently leaning towards the "furnace filter" method.

This is my first mock-up just to see how the "branches" would look on a 30 cm high tree (12 inches). Since this is a quick mock-up that took 5 minutes to make the trunk is not painted and the greenery ("needles") have not yet been applied. I like the size of the 30 cm tree, but I will try to make some larger ones too




The trunk is simply a 30 cm flower pin, and the lower part has been loosely wrapped with masking tape to add thickness and shape. Later I will paint the trunk dark brown with a plaster/tile grout/tempera mix to add texture (white glue, saw dust and acrylic artist paint is another method).

The "branches" are not really from a furnace filter but from a brown colored and torn apart "tile cleaning pad". The pads cost about 1.50£ each and will make 3-4 trees in this size. You simply tear the pad into thinner layers and smaller pieces, and then simply stick them onto the flower pin using random sizes and shapes, then glue them in place with spray glue or super glue to the trunk. The branches will be sprinkled with static grass later to make it a green pine.

In the middle of this picture below you can see a sample of a 50 cm (20 inch) tree trunk that's made from taping together 4 overlapping flower pins with masking tape and painted with the brown plaster mix. You can see the bare flower pin to the left of the trunk. The 50 cm trunk gives a huge impression compared to the 30 cm that blends in better with the landscape, but having a few really large trees gives the track a better sense of being "large scale". Sorry for all the mess on the track, but scenery work is messy, and fun




This warhammer guy explains the "furnace filter" method pretty well (if you can bare with him):


Next part: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-Gwgae6oJk8...;feature=relmfu

Have fun
Tore
 

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Tested some flocking


From left to right: one of the largest "cheap china" trees from eBay (20 cm), homemade "furnace filter" 50 cm old pine, and 30 cm young pine.



The trunks on the homemade trees still need painting since the plaster mix virtually crumbled off the tape, so I'm looking into other methods for the "bark effect". But these are the first pine trees I've made using this method so they are far from perfect. With some practice I think they will look good and compared to drilling single branches into a wood dowel these are much easier "batch produce" in large lots.
 

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One petunia in a field of onions
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How you go about making a tree depends greatly on the type of tree you are trying to make. Pines of various sorts are quite well covered and simple. But if you're after something that's non-coniferous it gets a little more complicated.


I used wire to build the armature for the eucalypts on my track and then added foliage following the suggestions of Brad Korando in his deciduous tree tutorial. The leaves are Noch Leaves for a change in texture to the usual.

Embs
 

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Hi Embs, love that somebody else is landscaping with an Oz bush theme. Very clever idea using the wire to make the trunk/limbs etc. A couple weeks ago we had some pretty strong wind around our place, & as you can imagine had the odd gum lose some branches, & in one case had a tree split in half.

Anyway, long story short....as I was cutting up trunks & branches for removal, thought I could pull a few select branches out & put them aside to make trunks. Was stuck on how to create some realistic looking branches, but think you may have just given me the light bulb moment I needed.

May I ask what you used to cover the wire?
 

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One petunia in a field of onions
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Happy to help RR. I've not found anything yet in the garden, wood shed or rubbish pile that makes a suitable 'old tree' trunk for a gum for me. There's something really special and full of personality when it comes to river redgums. It's no wonder the local Koori population think they house the souls of the dead.

I thickened my wire armatures up with hot melt glue (cos it's cheap) and then coated them in plasters joint compound tinted silvery grey. Since those ones I've made a few more armatures with various attempts at getting some aged trunk thickness. One was done with a bit of plastic tubing in the hopes of making a hollow trunk (I haven't finished it yet to know if it works well).

 

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Aah, very clever. Haven't got the time to play around with any of my "sticks" this week. Plan to have a go at something on Saturday. Guess I went for the real thing due to the colours of the bark....wanted as much realism as possible. After looking at your trees, I may borrow from your wire & hot glue method (with your permission of course) for the branches, with my sticks as the trunk.

Very majestic the old redgum, makes a fine piece of furniture too (my other hobby). Have you thought of maybe finding a suitable dried branch section & carefully running a drill bit through its length to give you a hollowed out trunk look? Might see what I can dig up around the place & try it out for you. Another look that I will have a shot at will be the burnt & regenerated tree, seeing how I visited a mate in Kinglake recently, alot of the tree's have really come back strong since the bushfires of a couple years ago. Will post pics on Saturday with the outcome.
 

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One petunia in a field of onions
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I have a couple of hollowed 'stumps' dremmelled out for use in other projects. My garage/backyard diorama will probably score one. I'll be trying a variety of things on other projects. Limited space for trees and such on this track and keep accessability.

Love the shaggy look of regenerating eucalypts. Fascinating to watch the flush of regrowth through the Grampians. I always intended to have a burnt out section in the track landscape. Might save it for the hill climb that's in planning though.

Looking forward to seeing your results RR.

Embs
 

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Well....what made me think that I'd have time for myself on a weekend when I have 4 teenage children?

However despite the taxi runs, I did get a chance to have a play around with making a tree.

Wanting the most realistic look I went for a clipping of the real thing to start the project, an average sized silver gum. A V8 supercar was used to compare the scale I was after.


Added a couple of wire branches to help fill it out a bit, & glued/painted to see how it'd come out. Not overly happy with the result just yet. Need to work more on getting the paint coulour right, & coating the hot glue with jointing compound.




Not to be put off, thought I'd have a practice on the canopy, used some scatter material from a railroad supplies that I picked up years ago.

Unfortunately it looks like they dont sell it any more
Sprinkled it on some teased out poly fibre. Contrary to Brad Korando's tree making post, I used green as it was all I could get at the local hobby store. Pretty happy with the look I got though.



Considering I hadn't shaped the poly fibre, & was probably a little heavy handed with the scatter it still looks pretty good for a first try (IMHO). Am thinking of having a shot at shaping some canopy on the armature I've made, & going a little easy on the scatter this time. If it exceeds expectation I can use it on the layout, if not.....it's all good practice.
 

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Went ahead & finished the tree I was playing around with, & doesn't look half bad. Will probably be a bit more discerning with realism on the ones I make to go on the track, but will use this one somewhere as it's the first one. I'm such a sentimentalist.
Let me know what you think of it's look.


Nothing like taking the T bird out for a spin on a sunny Sunday in the country side. May require a little imagination for the rest of the scenery.
Also hope he pulls the car up before the end of the rise in the background, it's a big drop to the floor.
 

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One petunia in a field of onions
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Looks like a fair way to start RR. Perhaps could be improved with some more clusters of foliage lower on the branches. But a fine start, none the less.
 
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