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Premium Member
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606 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The March is finished........not without a few "issues" along the way.

This is a "clear" 1/32 March 717 from Truescale bodies, and as I could not get the decals for the actual livery I wanted, being impatient, I went with a version that runs in the "historic Can am series.

I stole the injectors from a Mono/Rev McLaren (repainted to look anodised blue), mirrors from Carrera 917/30, driver Cartrix, and rollbar a modified Fly.

Wing, pipes etc. were scratch, as was chassis.

Cheers
Chris Walker







 

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Premium Member
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401 Posts
Really lovely work, both the body and that superb chassis!

Whenever I hear March Can-am, I always think of the original, unique 707 'Pontoon' nose, later also fitted to the 717 as it balanced the downforce better.

That version looked like this;



When I first saw one 'in the flesh', I was amazed how big it was, even alongside other Can Am cars.

Does anybody do this body version?

Stan Kirk.
 

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Premium Member
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606 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
QUOTE (stanleykirk @ 15 Feb 2012, 15:54) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Really lovely work, both the body and that superb chassis!

Whenever I hear March Can-am, I always think of the original, unique 707 'Pontoon' nose, later also fitted to the 717 as it balanced the downforce better.

When I first saw one 'in the flesh', I was amazed how big it was, even alongside other Can Am cars.

Does anybody do this body version?

Stan Kirk.

Stan Kirk, Truescale also does the March 707.......excellent bodies if you have not tried them......I prefer the 717 only because the 707 does have the nose fins molded in to the body, and I never quite know how to make them look acceptable with the clear lexan/Petg in between

Cheers
Chris Walker
 

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Registered
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227 Posts
Nice Job mate, Can Am cars rock.
And that looks the biz.

Hey Aquakiwi, only an (older) Aussie or a kiwi would remember Frank Matich.
A very clever bloke not that well known away, from just either side of the Tasman
 

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Eddie Grice
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2,323 Posts
Fantastic slotcar Chris.
Pins have always been the "accepted" way of mounting vacforms, looks like Chris has used large head type on this one.
For any budding scratch builders who may be looking: -
Notice he has done the sensible thing & raised the chassis pin tubes up, by mounting them on square tube spacers.
This moves the pins away from chassis bottom edge & prevents them ripping through the bottom edge of the shell.
He's also resiliently mounted the motor pod on rubber offcuts, (slices of sponge tyre centres Chris?) which should make a smooth quiet running model.
Eddie
 

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Premium Member
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606 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
QUOTE (gasowder @ 16 Feb 2012, 06:29) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Fantastic slotcar Chris.
Pins have always been the "accepted" way of mounting vacforms, looks like Chris has used large head type on this one.
For any budding scratch builders who may be looking: -
Notice he has done the sensible thing & raised the chassis pin tubes up, by mounting them on square tube spacers.
This moves the pins away from chassis bottom edge & prevents them ripping through the bottom edge of the shell.
He's also resiliently mounted the motor pod on rubber offcuts, (slices of sponge tyre centres Chris?) which should make a smooth quiet running model.
Eddie

Eddie, The pin tubes are soldered to some "U" shaped (actually a square "U" ) brass channel that I found a while ago at a local model train shop. As luck would have it, the width of the channel allows the bottom portion of the pin tubes to rest on the vertical legs of the "U" without falling to the bottom. This makes aligning the tubes a snap, and, has saved many a blistered finger over the years.

One of the guys in our club makes urethane tires/tyres, and he has poured me a few thin flat sheets of urethane....these I punched into circles (doughnuts), and are used for the pod mount grommets. I have used these for a few reasons.....1/ I have found it difficult to cut sponge tire centres with identical thickness and consistently flat sides, 2/ When compressed, and over time, sponge will develop a memory, and will lose its resiliency, unlike urethane. 3/Urethane has better dampening properties than foam.

Cheers
Chris Walker
 

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Russell Sheldon
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2,855 Posts
Simply outstanding, Chris. Like all your work, a very nice clean build.

Milan Tomasek at MTR32 makes a very nice vac-formed March 707:-





Martin, note the pins....

With kind regards,

Russell
 

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Dennis Samson
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807 Posts
QUOTE (ClubSpecial @ 16 Feb 2012, 20:25) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Alas, yes, Russell<G>
Martin

So, Martin - do you have a suggestion for a better way to mount a vacformed body?

Remembering that:

1. The body is painted from the inside
2. These cars are for racing, not for looking at, so the bodies need to be easily and quickly removable
3. The mounting system should not interfere with the smooth movement of the side pans of the frame.
 
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