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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Not an Ebay plug....We were talking about controllers of the past at the retro meeting at North London on Sunday, and the Martyn Gale controller was mentioned. Lo and behold, here's one on the bay...Vintage Slot Car Controller
 

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That's some serious heat sink
probably needed considering the electric heaters that people used as motor back in the good old day's!
Have a couple and must say they were well thought out and made, if your after a bit of slot history then don't let this one get away.
[oneofwos]
 

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Rob & John: Couldn't make the NLSME MRRC meeting last Sunday cos of canal boat duties, but that's an interesting controller I've not seen before although I know the name of Martyn Gale. Wasn't he a purveyor of rather nice chassis in the early '70s?

Are you saying that motor winds back then created more heat than those we use in BSCRA now? I find a ProSlot Group 12 - not the wildest thing around - heats up my transistor box pretty well, albeit it has no fan fitted. Still, it survived long stints at the recent National Team Race. John, I used your old 202 saloon with a sports body fitted to thrash around for practice. Next Monday it'll have a saloon body back on it for Luton club night. Rob, the Falcon F1 I used on the Saturday of the Team Race is ex-FLBT! An old 13UO conversion bought on e-bay from Mike Perkins after the fire.

Now I'm no longer working I'll have to fettle one or more F32s and motor down the A41 to North London next time, it's nearly as close for me in Aylesbury as Luton.

Cheers,

Richard.
 

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Back then they certainly used some much thicker winds than the 29AWG of a group 12 and thicker winds usually mean more controller heating.
24, 24 and 26 gauge arms were not uncommon back then

The resistors in those controllers are a close relative of an electric fire bar. An electric fire bar can run a lot hotter than a transistor, so a transistor needs a larger heat sink to get rid of the same amount of heat.
 

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Tony
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I can remember rewinding 26D's with 24 and 26 awg in the early seventies. Many a controller endbell and armature went west from the heat
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Good to hear that ex-FLBT cars are still being raced!

Hmmm - it's an interesting conundrum as so much has changed. Cars are much lighter now, and much faster. Controller tech has completely moved away from power resistors to different sorts of electronic circuits. We have gone from the full-size C can to ever shorter and lighter armatures and motors. Open-class winds now sometimes feature 24g and 25g motors even in 1/32 but 26g is still a good working guage. Like for like I think the 'power consumption' of modern full-race motors is comparable to those of old.

For me one of the big determinants is grip - when we used to goop the track during every event, the power needed to pull through the grip was huge and this put a load on the motors and controllers - I would think that the current draw on acceleration was higher and therefore the heating effect on a resister controller would be higher. And that's allowing for the fact that a lot of the time (most of the time?) the controller is either on the brake band or on full power!

Still the most effective way of burning out a resistor (or heating up any sort of controller) is to drive everywhere on part throttle, thereby using the power resistor or the electronic 'resistor' circuitry rather than the top and bottom bands.
 

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Tony Condon
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Hi Guys
The hairiest wind i remember was the mura "icebox" which you could buy as a 23 gauge if you wanted
I think paul turner installed one in a inline F1 and seem to remember that it turned over under the torque off the start line!!!
didn,t see it run after that

cheers tony
 

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QUOTE (roblees @ 5 Oct 2012, 12:57) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Still the most effective way of burning out a resistor (or heating up any sort of controller) is to drive everywhere on part throttle, thereby using the power resistor or the electronic 'resistor' circuitry rather than the top and bottom bands.

That's the way I drive and I have not burnt one out yet!!!??
Regards Allan
 

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There's no doubt that to drive everywhere on part throttle puts more heat into the controller than driving the same car using the top and bottom bands.
That's still true with low powered motors, but of course they put much less heat into the controller than high current motors.
Burning out resistors is much more of a problem with higher current motors like the ones most posters on this thread are talking about.
With low powered motors you can sometimes get away with driving everywhere on part throttle.
 

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Yes you're right 300SLR, and those of us who know Allan and his driving style have long suspected that he does routinely suspend the normal laws of physics, sometimes for an entire 3 minute heat.
 

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Stranger Things 2
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That's looks to be a serious bit of kit, never seen one before


With those finger segments on the back of the handle it looks like it may be set up as a thumb controller... yes or no ?
 

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Yes, it was designed as a thumb but could also used as a trigger controller.
Very sturdy and simple design, kept the heat away from your hand/fingers which was a problem back then.
Will try and post pictures of my two, one I converted for electronic use and the other kept as standard with a Champion 12ohm resistor.
[oneofwos]
 
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