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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My painting skills have reached a stage where I am happy with the process and finish (prepare body, undercoat, multiple top coats, with light sanding in between, decals and future - using halfords paint)

So far I have chosen cars that only have 1 colour + decals. Now I have a car that needs 3 colours - so how do I do it?

It's the porsche 906 detailed in another thread. I have loads of stuff - some tamiya maskiing rubber paint, tape, ordinary masking tape. Which is the best stuff to mask with? should I remove the masking stuff when the paint is wet or dry? If wet, then after each coat? (in this instance the base colour will be white, a bonnet panel will be red, and lower side panes will be silver)

Should I continue with spray paints, or use brush on paints? my goal is to have nicely defined edges to the coloured areas, and to not damage the base colour with whatever i use to mask...

advice appreciated

cheers

Dave
 

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...I have very good experience with Tamyia masking tape - and remove it when the coluor is nearly dry - no experience with masking film and very bad experience with any other masking tape!
 

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Ordinary masking tape is fine for masking but never, ever use the edge it comes with. Put the tape on a cutting board and use a sharp scalpel and metal rule to cut a new one. The reason for this is that the gum on the edges of the tape is exposed to the air while it is on the roll and dries out slightly so will never stick down perfectly allowing paint to bleed under.

I find the vinyl pinstriping intended for 1:10 RC cars is excellent for sharp edge masking - the sort where about 8 stripes of different thickness are on a shiny paper roll. For masking inside blobs I use this for straight edges and bulk out the interior with cheaper masking tape.

Another bit of advice (again from blobs but the principle remains the same) is that the first two coats must just be a very light misting, hardly visible in fact. If you put heavy coats on then wet paint is on the body for longer and this liquid can start to seep under the adhesive on the bottom of the tape. After a few thin coats, the masking edge is generally sealed and you can hit it a bit more violently but in a perfect world you should be spraying so lightly that the paint never appears to be wet in situ. However of course, this does take time.

I have mixed feelings on masking fluid - it's useful for compound shapes that are difficult to mask but against that I dislike the long drying time (although Windsor and Newton Watercolour mask is much quicker drying than Humbrol Maskcote), difficulty of application (a pencil dipped in it is better than a brush) and the fact that you can't really get a straight edge with it.

For large scale masking, I tend to mask the edge with tape and/or vinyl pinstripe and then use masking tape to tape clingfilm to the masking and wrap it around the area to be masked off. Make sure it isn't ripped in the process though!

Coop
 

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Julius Wilkko
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Hi!

Masking:
You can use any low-adhesive masking tape or liquid for masking. Low tack adhesive being really the key-words here. I´m sure that if you have some hobby-tape specially made for this purpose, it should be ok. I use Original Frisket Film that is fine-arts masking film. Low adhesive means that it is easy to remove and does not harm surface under masking film. Frisket Film is also very thin, so its easy to cut it into shape while it sits on the car body. USA: Createx Distribution LLC, UK: Simair Graphic Equipment LTD.

Painting & removal of mask:
If you are painting your colours on white you will have no problems achieving great results. Mask desired pattern on car body and spray very thin layer of paint to cover unmasked areas. If you feel that you need thicker layer of paint, spray next thin layer. Do not overdo it! Many times less paint achieves better result than excess paint. I do not recommend brush on paints when masking. Always spray your paint in thin layers, preferably with an airbrush. Masking can be removed almost immediately after spraying the last thin layer of paint. For next colour pattern wait for paint to dry 24h and mask and paint.

Cheers!

Julius
 

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Gary Skipp
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Hi Astro

Masking fluid is terrible. You can't see where it is amd it doesnt come off easily (respicially since 1/32 requires small areas to be masked).

Oridinayr masking tape isn't too bad, but its still quite bad. If you use it, make sure you seal the area at least 3 times, then mask over the masked bit. Sounds silly, but as much as possible really will get the best results. If you do it well enough, any 'speckles' that do get through (to the other colour) can usually be removed (carefully) with a cocktail stick or other sharp/fine implement.

Tamia stuff is probably what you need, judging form what the guys have been saying.

Good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for all the quality advice guys! Looks like I will be delayed til next week to start the painting project, but now I am looking forwards to it with confidence instead of fear!
 

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Beppe Giannini
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QUOTE (Coopdevil @ 15 Nov 2004, 19:46)Ordinary masking tape is fine for masking but never, ever use the edge it comes with.

NOW he tells me - just as I sprayed the last white stripe on my track !!

Very good pointer, nevertheless


Beppe
 

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I couldn't work out why I could never mask straight lines without bleeding and then I bought a book on painting lexan for RC and it said it in there. One of those 'oohhh......' moments.

Coop
 

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Just one more little tip that has come up before-
If you're nervous about 'bleed' under your masking, give the whole thing a light clear coat before the colour. That will seal the masked edges very well. Then procede as normal. Everything should work out fine!
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
ahh that sounds like a good idea...

just to double check - a clear coat AFTER masking? (seems to make sense in context)

and.. can I use Klear for this coat, or should I get some halfords laquer or whatever?
 

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Nobby Berkshire
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Tamiya tape is the best. No residue and little run. Easy to put on and remove as well. The 'fluid' stuff is OK, but is your hand that steady


Ordinary masking tape is a waste of time and the breaker of hearts when you peel it off to find paint everywhere underneath
 

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Masking materials? I use medium and low tack frisket, high tack clear vinyl from the local hardware store, water based masking fluid and the regular alkaline based masking fluids such as Windsor Newton with enamel and lacquers.

I usually splosh the masking fluid onto the surface, carefully cut the edge with a sharp X-acto #11 blade after it has dried and peel away the excess. If I have no choice and have to brush it over a particular area, I make sure I wet the brush and run it over a bar of soap before dipping it into the glop. That way I can flick of the dried bits and start with a sharp point on the brush and a fresh load of liquid mask.

Bob S
 
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