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Jan Groosmuller
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Next year we (local Dutch club) will run a series of these, so far we found out that on our track the CAN-AM cars by MGV run seriously well without the magnet fitted. As it will be a one-brand only series, we will run them box-stock but magnet removed. So far, we found out that with the magnet removed the cars are a LOT livelier, also it is a lot easier on the diff...

We've been considering options about the diffs, running the cars with a fully functional diff is one option, glueing the diff solid is another... but at a retail price of € 36,00 for just the diff a lot of these beauties will end up on the shelf (with a broken diff) as complete cars (New In Box) are readily available at roughly €50,00

Question #1: How do you fit a single solid straight axle in the rear? the "bearings" (hardly worth that name IMO) are WAY larger dia. than "normal" brass or plastic bearings... Also, if I would like to experiment with Slot.It gears (yes, they mesh OK) the boss on the crown extends so much towards the LH bearing that there will be a conflict of interest so to speak, resulting in no mesh at all...

Question #2: Has anybody got any experience in using different kinds of diff grease for these diffs? Should I just use Tamiya Ball diff grease or MoS2 grease?
(Yes, I know, the grease must have a high viscosity over a broad temperature range to fulfill it's destined task...)

Your opinions will be highly appreciated..

Jan
 

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QUOTE "bearings" (hardly worth that name IMO) are WAY larger dia. than "normal" brass or plastic bearings
see if you can talk to some people with the correct machines to get some custom made bearings turned up on a lathe
 

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Hi Jan,

Having raced the NSCC Vanquish and my own at my local club I have come to adore these cars!, they are fab!.

I believe (someone may correct me) that the 'Slot It' axle fits the rear end, which makes it become solid rather than diff.

However, as you said, with the Mags they tend to last.

Few tips:

Remove Magnet.
Fill up the diff with Grease.
Bond the filled diff together.
Take Rear tyres off and cut the molded 'nobble' off the rim.
Glue Tyres.

Oh, one more!, ENJOY!!!
 

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Hi Jan,
We race at North London on a 96ft 6in. routed recessed braided wooden(M.D.F.) track and have no experience of running these cars on plastic tracks but his is how I have made mine to work, as follows: throw the diff. away its a complete waste of time!, pare off the bearing up to the first locating lug, put a slot it gear onto tyre truer and with a small file remove brass from the boss to 1mm from set screw hole, replace plastic pinion(they fall off) with a metal one(solder it on) super glue motor, bearings etc. fit 3/32nd drill blank, put on a pair of ortman tyres, reassemble and away you go. The driver also looks like he is sitting on top of the car rather than in it so seperate him from the interior so attack his rear end and backs of legs with a dremel until he looks right and superglue him back in. Good Luck Steve
 

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Hi Jan, I run mine stock with out mag, except for the lowered drivers. I have had no problems with the diff besides the fact that they spin the inside tire a bit much, but it does keep them from going to far sideways. One cure for a broken diff that I've never heard or tried, but think it will work, is glueing the spider gears solid. We used to do this with 1:1 cars by welding them. Gets both tires to spin, but causes sqeals around any corner. Good luck.
 

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Hi Jan,
I love the Vanquish cars and they are at the top of my all time favourites to drive but only after performing the following mod:

1. Access the rear diffferential/final drive. Note the position of the axle bushes as you will require to refit them in exactly the same location again. Remove the wheels, brake rotors and axle bushes. There is no need to retain the remainder of the final drive axle and diff)

2. Using a Ninco 53.5mm 27tooth final drive axle try sliding the original VMG axle bushes onto the Ninco replacement axle remembering the position of the bushes from the original configuration as noted in step 1. If the fit is a little tight just lightly sand the new axle to allow a nice fit between the axle shaft and the bushes.

3. Slide on the disc rotors and lightly press on the wheels so that the axle and wheel assembly can be centred as required.

4. Remove the VMG motor and fit a Ninco NC2 or NC5. These are relatively easy and cheap to come by due to the number of people having excess NC2 or NC5's left over following a change out to a NC1 and they are usually willing to part with them for a lot less than new replacement costs and it helps offset the cost of their NC1 purchase.

5. All thats left is to centre the wheels on the axle shaft and once done glue them in place. Lube up the axle bushes and motor and away you go. There is no need to cut anything up, no huge costs for Slot-It parts and making good use of a redundant NC2 motor. All it costs in most cases is a Ninco 53.5mm 27tooth final drive which are very cheap and easy to source.

I run my 8 VMG on my 4 lane 45metre Ninco track with no problems what so ever with the magnet fitted. And on some local non magnet board tracks my VMG Mirage holds the track lap record, who could ask for more than that. Esay, cheap and ultra reliable and now I can even sand my tyres if I need too.

Hope this helps.

Regards,

Perro
 

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Jan Groosmuller
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks all for the fast replies guys, really helpful!

Of course the driver in my own car has been modified, took ca 2 mm off his rear end

Magnet has already been removed (easy to do if you buy the kit
) and of course the tyres and rims have been trued... a splash of lighter fluid really helps grip
on plastic track (Fleischmann, track is prepared with a little Parma Tyre Traction)

By the way, I didn't use any glue in assembling the kit, I just melted the parts together with a fine iron at a reasonably low temperature. Kit was assembled in about 45 minutes... and looks the business


Parma oilites in brass bushes is probably the way to go for a straight axle, have to see if we can allow these mods in our regulations


Jan
 

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Hi.
I have made this kit for my Vanquish, containing 2 adaptors for bearings, 3 ballbearings, and a spacer for lining up the gear.



You have to remove some of the brass, like explained earlier on.



The Vanquish runs like a rocket with this mod, and nothing else.
 

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Just feeling mean and nasty this evening, but I still remember when these cars came out VMG claimed that the diff added 20% extra cornering power. They also said 1/32 on the box. But despite that, our intrepid slot racers have still found a way to make them truly fun.
Hats off to all you tuners and fettlers around the world!
Why can't the manufacturers work out these things for themselves? It must cost thousands to get the tooling set up.
Anyway CanAm ROCKS! Whatever way you choose to do it.
 

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Jan Groosmuller
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks for all the advices, been a bit busy (new home and job....) but back online

Here: http://groups.msn.com/hobbyfoto/slotracepr...oto&PhotoID=616 is my solution, dead simple...
Used 2 flanged ballraces and a bit of brass rod of the appropriate diameter.
Glued the bearings in the chassis (no need to EVER take them out again....) press fit the rod in the bearings, cut to desired length and slid a slot.it axle in
.
No need to cut the axle, a drop of CA on the ends will secure the rims nicely and will allow different gears (at the moment the 28 is the biggest that can be mounted without any body mods)

Goes like stink, and is very very reliable...

 
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