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Those black rods look like they could be carbon fiber. You can buy such from McMaster-Carr (mcmaster.com). And not that expensive. The rods make the chassis widely adjustable. Great design.

I like the way the printed chassis components have all those rectangular holes, making them both light and stiff. Also inspired design.

The one thing I think could be improved is the location of the guide. I'd truncate the extended guide flag, make the whole guide shorter and move it as far forward as possible. A long guide lead helps handling.

Ed Bianchi
York Pennsylvania USA
 

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Definitely use piano/music wire. It is hard-drawn and typically has a tensile strength in excess of 400,000 pounds per square inch.

That translates to -- ready for this? -- about 2,800 MegaPascals. Yeah, 2.8 BILLION Pascals! That's a lot buddy, in any system of measurement.

Another impressive building material is miniature hard-drawn stainless steel tubing. That's the stuff they make hypodermic needles out of, You can get it with a wall thickness as thin as 0.004 inches -- about 0.1mm. McMaster-Carr (mcmaster.com) carries it. Very stiff, very strong and super light, since it is hollow. Solders beautifully and strong with Sta-Brite solder and Stay Clean flux. Lookee here -- most of the chassis is tubing.

Ed Bianchi

Circuit component Automotive lighting Nickel Auto part Automotive super charger part
 

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I experimented with filament-printed guides for quite a while, and finally gave it up. They all failed too easily under shock loads. Commercial injection-molded guides are much stronger, and shock-resistant, and can have small, useful features that are too difficult to print.

Printing parts gives you great design freedom, but they still have distinct shortcomings and weaknesses. For now guides are best purchased.

Ed Bianchi
 
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