Slot Cars Forum banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,509 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·


The Porsche 911GT3 is a Corgi 1:43 diecast mounted on an Artin chassis. As usual I lost the interior so the motor is visible. I haven't yet plucked up the courage to try Tamiya Polycarbonate Smoke spray to 'smoke' the glass as a couple of test runs on scrap clear plastic either ended up looking blotchy or just too heavy with the result that the glass may as well have been hand-painted gloss black. Still the innards aren't very visible when the car is on the track.

I kept the slot car rear wheels because they work well which lets the overall appearance down a little bit but is worth it for the fact that it produces a wonderful handling little slotcar. Wheel arches were opened out a little with the rotary tool to clear the bigger rears and fronts extended to accomodate for the wheelbase of the diecast being a tiny bit out with the wheelbase options allowable on the Artin chassis. Being a pin guide arrangement I didn't have to worry about a guide flag protruding in front of the car.

I love the livery of this car, it ran in the 2000 Le Mans 24h and is covered in those little white icons. I'm surprised Hornby didn't offer this one on their GT3 since the body is identical and it is a striking end result.





The yellow peril is a Shelby Series 1. Lovely looking car this, reminds me of a Calloway 'vette converted to a drophead. I first saw this car in Playboy, but trust me I only read it for the pictures. (Err... hang on, is that right?). And the German articles about Carerra of course.



Die-cast is a Maxi-Car reduced to £1.99 in the post-Christmas sales. Quite an easy conversion this one as the wheelbase matched one of the wheelbases of the Artin chassis perfectly and the rear arches clear the slot car wheels with no problem at all. Since the interior had to go I adopted a black card approach with a driver head mounted to it. I've seen some cars on Pattos gallery that just have a head on card which is not an ideal solution but it does look nicely 'retro' to my eyes so I quite like it.



The driver head was a strange one. Originally I test-fitted a plastic bare head from a Games Workshop 28mm figure (28mm means about 28mm tall for an six footer) which should have been quite close to scale but it was actually dwarfed by the car. The helmeted head I used is from an Artin 1:43 Formula 1 car but bizarrely it is identical in size to the 1:32 Scalextric heads in my bits box that come from Metros and TR7s. Now I think that this "too big" head looks right so, under the old modellers law that "if it looks right it is right" I suppose it is right. Even if I know it is actually wrong.

Since I did this I have sat down with my new copy of Gilham's Scalextric 6th edition and the photos in that show a massive disparity in the size of driver heads and oddly, yet mostly they look right. Odd.

I've got a load of other 1:43 diecast on my workbench at the moment, such as a Ferrari 288 GTO, Chrysler Panel Cruiser, Lambo V8-powered MCA Cententaire, F40 etc. Anybody interested in a step by step post on converting one?

Coop
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
183 Posts
yeah plz do a step by step how to

my son got a 1:43 Artin track and the cars are simply awfull i think
would be cool to have some better lookin' cars for him

greetz
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
220 Posts
Coop,

Nice work! I like the graphics as well. Show us your technique. Also, how does the car run with the heavy body and no magnet? Is it low enough to slide and not roll?

Why do we torture (I mean challenge) ourselves with these small cars when perfectly good 1/32 cars are available?

I did a 1/43 Burgo conversion last year. This Schlesser buggy kit cost $3! I added an artin 1/43 motor/tires/axle in the rear (with epoxy and a brass axle tube) after recutting the inline gear to a sidewinder gear!
(with a Dremel cut-off disk! Early signs of future modelling insanity to come...) I drilled out the Artin fronts and pushed them on the Burgo stub axles. They usually stay on
, but this adds to the "raid atmosphere" when the car finishes a lap on three wheels! The tall tires and high body position are pretty similar to the real Schlesser. The Artin Merc 300 tires and wheels would be even better.

I added extra decals and paint to the prepainted body and made the mudflaps out of flexibe magnet material.

I was even able to use the kit interior and faux suspension. Couldn't find a driver close by so I'm still waiting.











I love these Schlesser buggies and story behind them.

JT
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,509 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
QUOTE Also, how does the car run with the heavy body and no magnet? Is it low enough to slide and not roll?

They run very nicely. They don't show any tendency to roll over (but some of the diecast in the bits box like a Chrysler Panel Cruiser might be different). Slides very well. Stopping distance is a bit suspect though....

I run the standard Artin 6V on small tracks so the speed, acceleration and slidyness seems to suit the track size and power perfectly. Last tuesday I ran them on an MDF 1/24 track with loads of power and, no doubt due to the short pin, they generally went straight on out of the slot rather than tip.

QUOTE Why do we torture (I mean challenge) ourselves with these small cars when perfectly good 1/32 cars are available?

For me it's the cheapness and the vast ranges that are available. I pushed the boat out with the 911 it cost me a mighty £3.50(!) or less than half the cost of the Hornby kit of the same prototype in 1:32 plastic. I've been picking up Burago and Corgi from eBay for about 99p each. Plus there are so many cars available that just don't turn up in 1:32 and the finish of many of them is so much better than I could do.

QUOTE I did a 1/43 Burgo conversion last year -snip

Lovely! I haven't done anything this complex yet, all mine have been gluing the Artin chassis inside a body. The Burago kits are pretty good I've got a Beetle RSI and a Viper but the latter comes with decals for a Le Mans car but is the open top version!

You know, this could be perhaps the only sidewinder 1:43 in existence...


Coop
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
78 Posts
There are quite a few lightweight bodies available as well. There's a guy who makes dirt late models, and some GTP bodies. Resin is starting to crop up, and Boss Bodies is doing some clear PVC bodies as well. 1/43 is a rapidly expanding segment because of it's low cost, and low space requirements. The space thing is huge.

SS
SSS
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,509 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
QUOTE (smithspeedway @ 11 Feb 2005, 00:13)There are quite a few lightweight bodies available as well.
SSS

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Not quite as light as vac-form but this is a Fast Lane 1/43 RC body adapted to slot





Coop
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
361 Posts


I just bought this at a swap meet. Unknown metal body, surprisinly light, and Super Sledge mechanics. Nicely made by some Swedish builder who has since passed away, the seller even told his name which I of course forgot. "AM" could well be his initials.

I have no idea of the body manufacturer, or even the name of the car it represents! Anyway I am very happy to own a little piece of Swedish slot car culture.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,509 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Crikey! There's something dragged up from my disreputable past! Are you my ex-wife? (*)

The Scandawegian die-cast conversion is an Aston-Martin Ulster without it's cycle wings, probably why it has AM on the bonnet.

Coop

(*) Not really.
 

·
Slot-A-Holic
Joined
·
5,504 Posts
Thanks for sharing your works guys.

Some very nice conversions.

I have a Mercedes 190 EVO 2 DTM 93 K. Ludwig Minichamps 1:43 conversion laying around that use to look very good but now looks very abused.

It was my first venture in modifying and a simple job used a Artin motor and rear axle and the braids,
glued the motor in melted a few holes for the braids and the axle fitted on the chassis with no mods other then making a slot for the crown gear.

Here is a picture of a fresh one...


When i find it again i will post a picture of it here.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
336 Posts
Well, "cheapness"....

1/43rd is quite cheap as long as you stay on the toyish level of Artin, Carrera Go! or similar ones which don´t either place value on scale appearance, accuracy and real scale model nor on any kind of ambitious or developing technique.

And as long as you find cheap diecasts and mount them on fitting, cheap chassis you will have cheap cars ( which mostly look much better than the above mentioned ones ! ).

But as soon as you go in for finely detailed real scale models - similar to the tendency in 32nd and 24th scale - you will end up with prices as high as for a 32nd scale car very quickly, and even much higher.
The range of resin models in 43rd scale is almost endless. Their price range as well, unfortunately...

It is as usual in the eye of the beholder. If you never intend to take part in any 43rd scale races but do your hobby at home, the diecasts will by all means be good. They are one way in a developing part of our hobby. And a new and interesting way as well. In France diecasts have already been fully introduced and accepted as their own class in 43rd scale sotracing.
The Porsche, the Shelby , the Aston Martin and the Mercedes above look really scale - like in my opinion. That is what should count.

Nevertheless I myself prefer plastics - simply because I come from 32nd scale with its wide range of styrene kits and bodies and resin casts. And I think it is easier to reshape a plastic body rather than a metal one. And besides that it´s the life - long practice of putting emphasis on the total weight and c.o.g...

Cheap or not - there's more than one way to skin a cat.

Roland
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top