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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Astro's post re: Ninco Subaru got me thinking. I know, it doesn't happen very often! Quite a few motors come with stickers wrapped around them. The one's which concern me are the mabuchi ones such as those supplied in Pink Kar, and also the proslot evo range. The cans, as most of you know have 2 cooling slots (I presume that's what they are) on one side, running parallel to the armature. I usually cut the stickers away from these slots. Am I wasting my time or would it do some good say, in an endurance race?
I know the slots make it easy to spray lighter fluid in to clean the comm (hopefully)



Mark.
 

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I imagine it would make it cooler over a long period of time. Unfortunatly, I don't think it would make any performance difference as the motors don't really slow down when they are hot. So the only reason would be so you don't burn your hand when you pick it up, lol.

Lotus
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Health & Safety are always a primary concern.
What ?! lighter fluid...next to an arcing commutator?


Cheers, Lotus

Mark.
 

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Have you never cleaned a motor before?!?!

Surely no-one still thinks that it will all ignite in your face... If this has ever happened, I will personally replace your eyebrows (I have enough for two people). For the last time, the flammable liquid conducts the electricity so that it doesn't spark. Therefore no explosions, see?

Lotus
 

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noticed something in more old stuff thread, but my comment seems more appropriate here...

Sidewinder and someone else before (which i didnt find) was talking about motor freezing (ideally with an electronic safe freezer spray, not dangerous butane).

I haven't tried this - seems like a good idea particularly after tyre trueing which heats my engines up no end, but they were talking about before a race too, starting with it very cold.

So - is it a good idea? does the sudden temperature change have adverse affects? does it do any good?

Cheers

dave

... also on the 'cleaning motors' topic, no - I have never cleaned a motor before, and they probably are all full of bits of tyre from truing... so can you go through the procedure with notes of anything to be cautious about? Do you just fill the thing up with lighter fluid and let rip?????
 

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QUOTE (lotus03 @ 23 Mar 2004, 02:51)Have you never cleaned a motor before?!?!

Surely no-one still thinks that it will all ignite in your face... If this has ever happened, I will personally replace your eyebrows (I have enough for two people). For the last time, the flammable liquid conducts the electricity so that it doesn't spark. Therefore no explosions, see?

Lotus
Yes Lotus I've "cleaned" them before and as you say - no ignition
. Is lighter fluid a good substitute if you haven't got any switch cleaner? Just curious what's out there...

Maybe someone should personally replace my brain cell


Mark.
 

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I think those slots you're refering to are there to hold the magnets in place at the bottom of the can (there's a spring clip at the top) If you want cooling then you would need to cut more holes similar to Slotit and some of the Sun motor configurations. The best thing you can do to keep motors cool is reduce friction. This can cost anywhere from nothing(align everything properly) to a few Euros (adding ball bearings and balancing the armature).
Also you're better off using isopropyl alcohol to clean comms in the motor. Chance of fire is greatly reduced.

Jimmy
 

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Right here's how to properly flush out an old or dirty motor:

1. Remove from chassis.

2. Get a glass jaer and fill it up with either lighter fluid, white spirit, or a similar kind of cleaner.

3. Very Important! Emerse motor fully in liquid. FULLY. make sure everything except the wire are under the liquid.

4. Hook up to 9 volt battery. Not power supply.

5. Shield anything important; eyes, mouth, carpet.

Reasons: Fully emerse the motor because, as someone said earlier, the arcing can sometimes ignite the liquid. Not so, when it is fully emersed.
Don't use a power supply, because sometimes the liquid conducts and sghorts the power supply. At the very least, you will need a new power supply, at most an electrition to rewire your house...
Shield everything. Sometimes the liquid will splash a bit. As it's a powerful cleaner with loads of motor carp in it, itr could blind you or worse, wreck you mum's or your spouses carpet. Either place the jam jar lid back on or just do it on a tray.

This is how I do it, but I am in no way responsible how any injury resulting from ignition, blindness or a clout round the ear. After doing this, give it a bit of a clean with some water, then run it till it drys out.

When you just want to"juice" motor, while it's still in the chassis, get chosen liquid in a syringe or squity bottle. Spray on to Com and or brushes, and lightly on the bearings at each end of the shaft.
Useable liquids for squirting are: lighter fluid, switch cleaner, wd40, duck oil, white spirit, RC Com drops or other cleaning fluids.

After squirting, run the motor with a 9v battery for a couple of seconds.

Motor speed can increase by up to 50%. Just try it. Make sure that it's all dry before you put it on the track, 'cos otherwise you'll be disqualified, or screw up the track.

Hope this all helps, anything else?

Lotus
 

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Al Schwartz
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My favorite for this type of cleaning was the now generally banned carbon tetrachloride - a very powerful cleaner, non-flammable and prone to cause liver damage (although, despite the fact that I once used rags soaked with it to clean the rails of my HO gauge model trains, I still take my before dinner tipple and a bit of wine with sans any apparent distress). I find that a bit of braid cleaner squirted in to the motor in the general direction of the commutator keeps things running a bit smoother and faster. I also use braid cleaner soaked pipe cleaners to clean my braids before running- and, when allowed, between heats. It is truly amazing to see the amount of dirt that comes off with each application! Use commercial electrical contact cleaner with caution. Some of them are not kind to styrene. They won't dmage the motor but could cause an unfortunate redecoration of any neighboring body bits.

EM
 

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Brian Ferguson
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One of the simplest ways to clean a motor is to immerse it in water. That's right, water. Run it under water at low voltage for a few minutes and check the condition of the water. Filthy, ain't it? You don't need solvents because it is not the solvent that is cleaning the brushes and comm. It is cavitation. The same thing that eventually chews up boat propellers. Cavitation is what happens when a spinning surface revolves in a liquid, especially if there are fixed barriers (the brushes) riding against the spinning object, or irregularities in the object's surface (the comm segment gaps). In essence, a negative pressure is formed directly adjacent to the spinning object (comm) and especially behind any barrier (the brushes). This literally creates microscopic vaccuum bubbles which subsequently implode. Multiple implosions happen at high frequency, creating zillions of tiny shockwaves that assault the surface of the comm. THAT is what cleans it.

Also, running a new motor under water for a few minutes is one of the easiest ways to break in a fresh setup.

You can dry it with heat or just let it run in free air, but you do need to dry it out. Then be sure to oil appropriately.

Don't believe it works? Take an old junk motor and try it.
 

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Talk about science wizz...


Well done Fergy, yet again you have explained the theory behind an everyday slot racing occurance.
But how on earth do you know about cavitation? What's you're engineering background?

Lotus
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Ah, cavitation! The scourge of every submariner
I thought it was just a noise issue. I had no idea that it eventually knackers propellers.

Run silent, run deep my friends! I still dip (get it..dip? oh well) into 688i Hunter Killer now and again.

Fergy, when you mention low voltage, do you mean AA size 1.5 volt, or maybe as high as a PP3 9volt battery?

Mark.
 

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Brian Ferguson
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QUOTE What's you're engineering background?

Whenever the engineers are in the background, I listen!
It was explained to me many years ago by an engineer and confirmed by more engineer-types, so I assume it to be true. And after trying the method, I couldn't deny that it worked. No science wizz here, just a good listener!


QUOTE when you mention low voltage, do you mean AA size 1.5 volt, or maybe as high as a PP3 9volt battery?

3 volts should be quite adequate, so a couple of D cells would be perfect. And it doesn't need to be run for very long, usually just a few minutes. Too much time in a liquid and you are actually etching away the comm surface.
 

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Nice on Fergy. But never mind the PP3s should it be sparkling or still water? Or even tap water from Peckham?
 

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Brian Ferguson
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QUOTE should it be sparkling or still water?

Yes, the motor will be sparkling, and it should still be water...
 

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After reading this thread I had to test this cleaning method on a couple of my motors, and the water did get filthy. Haven't tried running them on the track yet, but it will be interesting to see if there is any difference.

I am unsure about Scalextric "Sport" motors, should the wrapper around the motor be removed before cleaning?
 

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I think it should be stated at this point that the motors do get VERY hot when running, and in the past I have known certian bodyshells to warp when racing due to the extreme temperature. I guess the message is be careful when tinkering with a freshly used motor.

Aaron
 
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