SlotForum banner

1 - 20 of 33 Posts

·
DT
Joined
·
5,195 Posts
Hi guys,

Guess what! I'm finally building… my track.

After a about 14 months of playing around with circuit designs, I've come up with one that I can live with and now I'd like to build it into a table and add a few trees and stuff.

For some of you who have done this, it may be only of slight interest, but to some who haven't, you may find pleasure of sharing my pain and pleasure.

I'll take photos along the way so you can see what I'm up to and I even have a WiFi camera that I'll hook up next week to allow you to see life on the track!

My garage has a room above that I use for my gym and as a server room for my Internet servers that make too much noise in the house. Seeing as I don't get around to doing much gym for lack of motivation, I built a Scalextric Sport track on the floor.

I bought the Scaley box kit last year as it had the RMS system. This set is what brought me back into the hobby after a 25-year break. If you can plug something into a computer, then I like it.

I found a really cool model shop in Wellingborough, UK that had the best price and was willing to ship to France. A week or two later I ordered enough track to make up a decent sized 4-lane layout. And bought quite a few cars along the way. I've been plotting and planning ever since and now, with the advent of the forum, I'm motivated enough to build the layout.

Anyway, today I tackled the baseboard.

Check it out. Here is the final track plan on the carpet. It has been said before and I'll say it again: Be happy with your track plan and play with it for a long time on the carpet before you build it into a layout. I might still add a S-chicane somewhere to add some spice, but I can do that without changing the basic layout.





I added about 10cm to the front and 5cm to the back, with a little space of the ends for the table. I have used 10mm plywood as the base.

I dismantled the track in sections and put it to one side.


Here it is the baseboard laid out and measured to size.




I've cut it with a circular saw and stopped for the day. I need a little wine and food. I have to think about sticking it all together. Do I make it a fixture of the house or do I do it in sections that fit through the door in case I move one day and want to take it with me.


I'll do some more tomorrow and keep you posted.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,493 Posts
permenant, then there's no worries.. use screw though!

and dont pin the track down! use some special things to pin it down with.. they are like
_
_| and the slots at the side of the track will take these clip things.. if you want I will send some over!

Inte
 

·
Allan Wakefield
Joined
·
5,857 Posts
Looking great!

How long till I can get an invite to drive over and race you for pink slips ?


Permenant - BUT make it sectional so you can get it out if you ever need to.

OR

make the scenrey sectioanl so it can be lifted, along with the track (Inte's idea of the purpose made Scaley track clips is a great one)

OR

Get me over for the weekend and I will tell you what to do and what not to do as I drink your coffee and fiddle with your cars
 

·
DT
Joined
·
5,195 Posts
After some wine and some consideration, I'll screw the table together instead of using my polyurethane never-come-un-done glue, and build my scenery on top. If I move, which I plan to when I get rich, I'll cut the scenery with my Japanese wood saw over the table-top joints and move it in pieces although I'll probably want a new track by then anyway so I'll hack it to bits. I've ordered the WOODLAND SCENICS - Rock Molds as recommended by David from Colorado. I have quite a bit of green stuff and a few trees already.

Swiss, you can come over anytime and fiddle with my cars.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
329 Posts
Hey there!

Fantastic stuff Nuro. Can't wait to see the next update and how you get along. Good luck and have fun along the way fella.

Cheers,

slik.
 

·
DT
Joined
·
5,195 Posts
2nd instalment!

Boy am I bushed! I'm stiff and sore all over from lifting wood and getting into contorted positions attaching the baseboard to structural struts that make up a sort of frame.

Here the frame is seen screwed down to the baseboards.


The tools that I used. It's handy to have a drill to make the primer hole and a rechargeable electric screwdriver. Notice the Japanese draw-saw that makes light work of cutting the frame pieces to length in the mitre box.


The table is up and on trestles.


A view from underneath. I'm going to need two more trestles to stop the middle of the table sagging a little. For the moment I'm using an adjustable height stool to keep the middle flat.


Here I've laid out the track again.


I'm being obsessive and making sure the straights are really straight. These clips for the Sport track keep the 4-lanes together in the middle.


Looking up the main home straight.


Close-up. You can see the surface of the Sport track.


Another type of clip on the side of the track keeps everything together. These ones go in every now and then - no need for too many.


Well it's coming along fine. I've had fun doing this and I can just image the fun to be had when it's done.

More to come...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,883 Posts
What a neat and tidy worker - not a sign of sawdust anywhere!
It's looking good.
Speaking of clips to tie twin tracks together, one of our guys uses black electrical insulating tape on the suface of Sport track, running along the longitudinal joint, to disguise any small gaps. It works very well, being almost invisible.
 

·
DT
Joined
·
5,195 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
QUOTE (Tropi @ 29 Sep 2003, 12:28 AM)What a neat and tidy worker - not a sign of sawdust anywhere!...
Thanks. There was sawdust, but I wanted it to look good for the photographs.


I have a question
What height should the overpasses be? Thinking that one day I might invite Slik with his two trucks over for some beer, a chat and a race, I would hate for them to bet blocked under the bridge. What clearance?
 

·
DT
Joined
·
5,195 Posts
3rd instalment!

I'm working on the elevated sections. I'm still supporting all track on plywood so even the elevated sections rest of solid wood for stability.

I brought the electrical extentions under the table to reduce the wires going out to the wall. Here I tape the two that do to prevent people tripping up.


Under the table, I secure the plug point.


Here the edge of the ramp up and down is sanded to prevent any bump


I measured plywood to fit under the elevated sections leaving enough space for borders and fencing.




The bridge sections are secured to the table before I lay and screw down the plywood on top.


This is allot of fun!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,149 Posts
Nuro,

Looking good! Hurry up, I want to see some scenery on that thing!

David
 

·
DT
Joined
·
5,195 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
QUOTE (Dennis David @ 5 Oct 2003, 07:08 PM)Nuro,

No problem with table sag? Only 14 months of fiddling with the layout design ... there's hope for me yet!
I have something in the middle now to keep it perfectly flat and I've ordered two more trestles. I use the trestles as the whole thing is going to up to the roof on pulleys when I'm using the gym for the purpose that it was intended.
 

·
DT
Joined
·
5,195 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
What David Reinecke didn't go into detail on was how the rocks were made. I found this quite fun and got Thomas, my 5 year-old son, to help out. He did some from start to finish.

Here are the moulds from Woodland Scenics (bought from Wholesale Trains). I think it's just latex rubber so actually you could make your own if you find a suitable form.




I mixed up the plaster and filled the moulds. I added a little foam to add bulk and to lighten the rock. I can imagine that when I'm done, my table is going to be heavy enough.


The moulds are full and the plaster is drying held flat in a box of foam peanuts.


Finished results.




I'm going to have fun painting these. I'll use David's recommendations when I get to that stage.
 

·
DT
Joined
·
5,195 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
QUOTE (Tropi @ 11 Oct 2003, 07:04 PM)Nuro, going back a little to the first section, what is a 'Japanese draw saw?'
It has fine teeth and thin kerf making it good for dovetails and fine work.
Cuts on the pull stroke, giving easier control.

Check out something similar at Axminster (UK). I get mine at Lee Valley Tools (US and Canada). It makes cutting just as fun as with the powertools.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
66 Posts
QUOTE (Nuro @ 11 Oct 2003, 10:33 AM)Cuts on the pull stroke, giving easier control. I get mine at Lee Valley Tools (US and Canada). It makes cutting just as fun as with the powertools.
Hmm....yes...those are sexy saws. My dad has a couple of those.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,883 Posts
I'm glad I asked - that's a new one on me and probably to a lot of people.
Thanks very much for the info and links.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Hey Nuro:

How wide is your table?

I am planning a 5 foot by 16 foot table. I was pretty much set on a 2 lane track, but after seeing yours, I might be able to squeeze in 4 lanes.

Stuart
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
89 Posts
<Cuts on the pull stroke, giving easier control.>

You can just reverse the blade on a coping saw and get the same result. FYI

Nice job on the boards, layout, and pictoral "how to".
 
1 - 20 of 33 Posts
Top