SlotForum banner
1 - 20 of 29 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
522 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I wrote a new article with pictures that describe how I believe digital races should be conducted. The rules are simple and are designed to empower fast drivers, keep slower cars safe, and minimize collisions.

First draft.
 

·
Martin Kay
Joined
·
728 Posts
QUOTE (darainbow @ 4 Jan 2005, 08:45)I wrote a new article with pictures that describe how I believe digital races should be conducted. The rules are simple and are designed to empower fast drivers, keep slower cars safe, and minimize collisions.

First draft.
<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Looks good although I'm not sure about "legally ramming", anything that suggests that someone could deliberately try and shove someone else off the track, in the confines of a 2-lane 6-car environment is just asking for more blocked lanes and further pile-ups. In our experience overtaking moves and side-swipe situations all happen so quickly that without the benefit of a slow-motion replay it's often really hard to tell who was at fault. Asking people to try not to run in to other cars might be the best we can hope for...!

Cheers
Martin
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,634 Posts
nice to see rules being formulated!

with regards to the rear-ending/shunting, the comment about this always leading to a deslot is specific to Carrera muscle cars/nascar. With the scalextric audi and porsches, they can shunt eachh other quite a lot and at fairly high speeds, only occaissionally resulting in a deslot.

Maybe it is down to the shapes of the cars involved, or to scalextrics higher magnetism? don't know.

just thought I would point this out though
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
QUOTE (martinkay @ 4 Jan 2005, 13:35)I'm not sure about "legally ramming", anything that suggests that someone could deliberately try and shove someone else off the track, in the confines of a 2-lane 6-car environment is just asking for more blocked lanes and further pile-ups. In our experience overtaking moves and side-swipe situations all happen so quickly that without the benefit of a slow-motion replay it's often really hard to tell who was at fault. Asking people to try not to run in to other cars might be the best we can hope for...!

Cheers
Martin
<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

I also think that allowing "legal" contact would be wrong, as well as being just unworkable. There will be howls of protest from those people who are practicing their takeout moves, but I believe the only workable rule would be that any contact that results in another car being deslotted should result in a penalty. If running to "crash and burn" rules, this would have to be disqualification. This would include knocking off a ghost car.

Steve
 

·
Matt Tucker
Joined
·
3,550 Posts
Nerfing in digital and non-digital racing is a skill that if applied skillfully can gain you considerable advantage. However if done persistently and obviously then no-one will want to play with you. Therfore I thinbk this type of rule is unnecessary as those who persistently violate this moral code won't be invited to play again.

Matt
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
522 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I dont think people who have replied really understand the intent of the ruleset, that must be a failure of my communication.

Noone can be legally rammed UNLESS they use a LC.

If drivers are courteous, they will not create a situation where they can be rammed. The only time a car can be rammed is if a slower car shifts in front of a faster car. If anyone complains about being rammed it is his own damn fault.

The whole rulesset is designed to do two things:

*Keep traffic flowing. Reduce conditions of being locked behind slower cars.
*Eliminate the cat-and-mouse game of trying to predict when/where your opposition are changing lanes.

Perhaps some people enjoy the prospects of being locked behind slower traffic. Also, unless there is an enforcable code-of-conduct, no serious racing can be done. Telling someone to "move over, im going to pass" is more likely to create hard feelings, especially when the driver does not feel like moving over.

Keep in mind that when used by drivers who know the course and the rules, there wont be ANY ramming, unless someone makes a mistake or takes a risk at another driver's expense.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,634 Posts
I believe in UK road law, if you rear-end someone, then it is your fault. However, people have been abusing this - kids started braking suddenly so that the person behind crashed into them, and then put in an insurance claim! the rear-ender was technically at fault (should have been leaving a safe distance between them and the car in front) - although the car in front undoubtedly CAUSED the accident ('on purpose' was a sticky matter for the courts!)

If rear ending was always the fault of the car behind, then by doing emergency braking manouvres all the time, you could work through the field disqualifying everyone else! (though as matt says - no one would want to race with you!)

I think having automatic rules on rear ending may be tricky - you will need a judge/referee to determine who CAUSED the shunt.
 

·
Martin Kay
Joined
·
728 Posts
Thinking about what would happen in the real world is sensible. I think we are talking here not so much about rear-ending but swerving in front of someone using a lane-change. If someone did that to you on a motorway you would always try and brake - even if the other guy is a complete nutter and even if you are sure you would come off best in either an accident (if you allowed it to happen), or in any subsequent court case. To win a slot car race you have to stay on track, any contact with another car creates a risk that you might not.
Cheers
Martin
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
522 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Yes but if someone swerves in front of you, they know they can be thrown of track so it serves as a deterrent -- if they want to win they wont swerve in front of you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,634 Posts
I agree with darainbow, but as indictacted above, I would say any sudden slowing in front of a car should be considered the fault of the car in front, except coming up to a corner where that car needs to slow anyway (gosh its complicated!)
 

·
Alan Paterson
Joined
·
835 Posts
I think there are both sides to this discussion,

I understand totally why Darainbow is enforcing the allowable shunt, the words I believe ar " to keep the racing flowing", but I also understand that, as in real racing, slow traffic is totally part of the bigger issue, and, some drivers can find an advantage by being more efficient through slow traffic than others.. (A really fast dewd in a red car comes to mind...)

But, purposeful blocking should be allowed for a timed period, similar to the Blue Flag in racing. If the leaders are coming up to lap you, and you pass three waved blue flags, you get a stop and go penalty..

Depending on the track length, perhaps enforce a rule that the blocking car may only block for the length of 1 complete lap, after which it has to allow the overtaking, or, then, it is allowed t\o be nerfed out the way..

Regards

Big Al
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
522 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Al,
Your rules sound good too, they are just a differnt flavor from mine. Thats why I gave my ruleset a name -- so they can be identified for what they are.

I encourage people to come up with their own rule sets and they should be named so people can tell them apart.

Everyone is going to have different ideas of what will work and what is best. I am open to trying other rules but i dont think they can be amalgamated into one holy-grail ruleset.

Chris
 

·
Soren Winkler Rasmussen
Joined
·
355 Posts
QUOTE (martinkay @ 4 Jan 2005, 12:35)Looks good although I'm not sure about "legally ramming"You can always modify the body work of your car, so that the nose of any car rear ending you, will be lifted out of the slot.

That should solve the problem in a natural way.
 

·
Brian Ferguson
Joined
·
3,652 Posts
Perhaps I'm just very naive, but slot racing has always embraced the concept of "sportsmanlike" behaviour. Drivers who intentionally take other cars out, or frequently nerf, are subject to penalties by the organizers or are simply asked not to return. I'm not sure why this won't quickly fall into place in the digital arena. Are you not trying to legislate something that will duely happen anyway?
Yes, I realize there are more opportunities for bad behaviour under digital, but surely the sensibilities of the majority will prevail and an accepted digital etiquette will become commonplace without complex written rules being necessary! Or should I bring my lawyer along to digital races?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
522 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
QUOTE (Fergy @ 4 Jan 2005, 20:09)Perhaps I'm just very naive, but slot racing has always embraced the concept of "sportsmanlike" behaviour. Drivers who intentionally take other cars out, or frequently nerf, are subject to penalties by the organizers or are simply asked not to return. I'm not sure why this won't quickly fall into place in the digital arena. Are you not trying to legislate something that will duely happen anyway?
Yes, I realize there are more opportunities for bad behaviour under digital, but surely the sensibilities of the majority will prevail and an accepted digital etiquette will become commonplace without complex written rules being necessary! Or should I bring my lawyer along to digital races?

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Youre pretty much wrong on this.

Some people believe that digital affords them an opportunity to block other cars. My rules make it clear that is not acceptable. Big Als rules, OTH, suggest blocking is acceptable, for a time.

Even with the most sportsmanlike behavior, nerves will become frayed. "Did he take the LC to pass or was he trying to block me!!?" "Did he intend to run me off?" Also, there will be frustration at being locked behind a slower car and losing ground on faster cars. "You idiot, why do you keep taking the LCs Im trying to use!?!?"

If you want to do digital rugracing and tell everyone to drive nice, thats great, but it wont cut it at a club level. An unwritten code of conduct will develop and there will be lots of grey areas. That may be fine for you.

My system only has TWO rules and makes it clear what is acceptable driving. No grey areas.

Take it or leave it. Propose your own rules, but I guarantee a year from now your group will have their own code of conduct with more than two rules even if they're not written down.
 

·
Martin Kay
Joined
·
728 Posts
Our track is marked with a blue lane which is the one *lapped* traffic is supposed to move to, we have said within the space of 3 LC opportunities (in our case this equals 1 lap) - this mimics the blue flag a tail-ender would get in a real Grand Prix, and also when they are black flagged for passing more than 3 blue flags. But if cars are racing for position, then blocking other cars, or driving defensively and making your car as difficult to pass as possible, happens all the time in real racing. Thierry Boutsen did it to Ayrton Senna and others for pretty much the whole of the 1990 Hungarian Grand Prix and won it. Although you're not allowed to weave on the straight, so those with straight LCs would need to consider making a rule to dissuade someone from blocking a chasing car by switching lane to be directly in front of them. The other thought that occurred is that in practice it's unlikely that anyone would be able to block someone else for very long, as you will inevitably catch a backmarker or get held up by someone else's accident which will offer the quick thinking driver an opportunity to pass.
Cheers
Martin
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
522 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
QUOTE (martinkay @ 4 Jan 2005, 21:38)Our track is marked with a blue lane which is the one *lapped* traffic is supposed to move to, we have said within the space of 3 LC opportunities (in our case this equals 1 lap) - this mimics the blue flag a tail-ender would get in a real Grand Prix, and also when they are black flagged for passing more than 3 blue flags. But if cars are racing for position, then blocking other cars, or driving defensively and making your car as difficult to pass as possible, happens all the time in real racing. Thierry Boutsen did it to Ayrton Senna and others for pretty much the whole of the 1990 Hungarian Grand Prix and won it. Although you're not allowed to weave on the straight, so those with straight LCs would need to consider making a rule to dissuade someone from blocking a chasing car by switching lane to be directly in front of them. The other thought that occurred is that in practice it's unlikely that anyone would be able to block someone else for very long, as you will inevitably catch a backmarker or get held up by someone else's accident which will offer the quick thinking driver an opportunity to pass.
Cheers
Martin
<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

That will work too. I expect most people to develop and try their own rules, but the point is that you came up with *something* to establish order.

I dont think trying to model slots after real racing is necessarily a good idea, after all in real racing you can just drive around a slower car. In DSR a slow car could plant himself in front of you knowing that you wont be able to pass, even if he slows down. I think at best we can approximate the action.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
916 Posts
I came up with a very simple rule for racing on Digital slot car tracks.

If a car comes up behind you, don't use a LC (maintain your current lane).

This forces the faster car to take a LC and make a pass.

Brian
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
522 Posts
Discussion Starter · #19 ·
QUOTE (bswan72 @ 4 Jan 2005, 23:27)I came up with a very simple rule for racing on Digital slot car tracks.

If a car comes up behind you, don't use a LC (maintain your current lane).

This forces the faster car to take a LC and make a pass.

Brian
<{POST_SNAPBACK}>
How do you define when a car is "behind" another one. 1pc back? 3pcs back?
 

·
Soren Winkler Rasmussen
Joined
·
355 Posts
QUOTE (martinkay @ 4 Jan 2005, 21:38)Our track is marked with a blue lane which is the one *lapped* traffic is supposed to move toAnother crazy idea.


How about redefining the big brake button on the Scalextric Digital controller:
Trigger = throttle with dynamic braking on open throttle.
Small button = normal lane change.
Large button = opposite lane than previous car.

If you're right behind a car that's blocking, you press the big button ... if the car ahead changes lane you stay on the same lane, otherwise you change lane.

All configurable in the menu ofcause.


Is that too far out.
 
1 - 20 of 29 Posts
Top