SlotForum banner
1 - 3 of 3 Posts

·
Bill
Joined
·
2,888 Posts
QUOTE (Trg888 @ 11 May 2010, 07:12) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Anybody know of a decent track designer software?? The Scalextric free one is pretty crap.

JimHi Jim, well, let me first say: that's some pretty cool scenery that you've already done!

As for software, I use Railmodeller for the Mac. It's fine. I'm guessing that you're using a PC though.
 

·
Bill
Joined
·
2,888 Posts
QUOTE (Trg888 @ 14 Dec 2010, 14:44) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Well I'm a novice I hadn't thought of braid tracks until I saw tracks on here.
I think it would be difficult as I'm building modular.... I'm building it in UK where I work mostly and transporting to my holiday place in mountains in Austria. Also I will have 16 boards when done, wouldn't braid be a problem to join? or what just run the metal stuff over the joins? I've used mostly 6mm marine ply or 6mm fibre board for the road, could that be converted to braid later or does it have to be mdf? What thickness should the mdf be? That loop after the level crossing might prove to be a problem with plastic after the level crossing.

Jim
Hi Jim,

I totally understand. I did the same thing with my 2nd track because I thought I was a novice. However, judging from the quality of your work, MDF would be no problem for you. It would also give you more flexibility in design. Joining braid in modular tracks is easy (essentially you can pressure fit it). Copper tape would be a little more tricky. Still, I think you'd be happier in the end with MDF. Lots of ways to convert it. You could lay two strips of 1/4" mdf on top of the marine ply and fiberboard with a slot in between, for example. I've also seen the slot cut with a jig saw, though router is better IMHO. You can lay braid on anything. I use 3/8" mdf, but in the UK that would be 9mm (I think). Just my suggestion. Your designs and scenery really are first rate.

Bill
 
1 - 3 of 3 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top