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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
i dont see many people refering to or using some of the newer moters like the drop in fc130 motors. like the hawk6&7 or the slightly dearer pro slot eurospots. it cant be cost because a hawk is half the price of a slot it or nsr. any ideas. john
 

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The Falcon 7 is the standard motor for quite a few entry level metal chassis classes in the UK and are extensively raced at clubs level up to and including National level.
The Hawk 7 is quite similar, but is little used in this sort of racing because the rules at most places require the Falcon.

Slot.it and NSR motors are designed for plastic chassis racing. A Falcon or Hawk 7 would physically fit quite a lot of plastic chassis but generally would be overpowered for that sort of use.

The Hawk 6 and ProSlot Euromotor have the big advantage they are serviceable, rather than the sealed Falcon7 / Hawk7 which have to replaced when something goes wrong with them. The ProSlot Euromotor comes in several different specs, the quickest in a metal chassis seems to have slightly less top end power than a Falcon 7, but is little used in this sort of racing because the rules at most places require the Falcon.

I haven't seen a Hawk 6 in use.
 

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Hi John,
These motors are great for BSCRA racing (metal chassis, vac form Lexan bodies and sponge tyres).
The Falcon 7 is the standard motor for most BSCRA clubs and for 1/24th Scale D3 retro racing but the top of the range ProSlot Euro motors and Hawk 6 are very much their equal. There have been moves to allow these motors to be used alongside the Falcon 7 in the UK (they are already in use in the USA) but the fact that they are easily rebuildable, and can therefore be modified, is currently delaying such a move. The Hawk 7 is an FK130 like the Falcon 7 and TSR D3.
One of the Wellingborough members has a Hawk 6 fitted to a 1/24th JK production chassis and it appears to have a very slight performance advantage over a Falcon 7.

They have way too much power for any plastic RTR car running on 'rubber' tyres.

Some people have run them in ' classic/retro' style events (metal chassis, hard bodies and 'rubber' tyres) on a few of the larger tracks that we race on and, although just about drivable, the biggest issue has been keeping the tyres on the rims at such high rpm.
If you race magnet cars it is certainly possible to add enough traction magnets to make these motors useable but you end up with a car that is so 'stuck to the track' that it takes all the fun and skill out of racing. We used to do this at the Luton club but it got to the silly stage where the entire track was flat out except for a quick lift into the two hairpins and motors were failing through over heating in a 3 minute race.

As for cost, my first choice for plastic RTR cars and 'classic/retro' cars is always the Scaleauto range. Big range of motors and best horse power for money on the market. I wouldn' use a Slot.It or NSR motor unless the rules insisted.
As I don't do magnet racing anymore 'magnetic leakage' from a motor doesn't matter to me.

I know ProSlot do some lower rpm motors but I have been disappointed by their performance.
They are heavy and seem to be lacking in torque.
The endbells are very useful though. I have fitted these to quite a number of Scaleauto motors for 'classic/retro' racing.

Cheers.
****.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
the scaleauto motors are good and cheap to boot. ive got a king 46 in a plastic chassis vanquish and boy is it quick and fun to drive. sanded and painted ninco home track and no magnets ive got several of the rebuildable 6&7 hawk motors, some are going in plastic chassis cars[ suitably strengthend] and some are going in wire and brass scratchbuilt chassis. why dont clubs have a RWYB night for some of the radical cars to race, it could be quite entertaining. john
 

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QUOTE ive got a king 46 in a plastic chassis vanquish and boy is it quick and fun to drive.
OK John but!
The King motors are intended to have high magnetic leakage so you have a significant magnetic effect even if you've removed the traction magnets.
And, the Vanquish cars are about 1/28th scale so are way bigger than any true 1/32 scale car.

I still think you are going to struggle with the power of a Hawk in any 1/32 scale car especially as they have no significant magnet leakage.
Just enough power not to over power your rear tyre grip is usually the fastest way round any track.
Too much power is often slower in the same car than too little.

Let us know how you get on.

QUOTE why dont clubs have a RWYB night for some of the radical cars to race, it could be quite entertaining.
We have tried this kind of thing at Wellingborough but the response is usually not good.
Most club members fall into two groups. Those who scratchbuild (the minority) and those who race RTR cars (the vast majority).
The RTR racers usually vote with thier feet by not turning up if scratch built cars are allowed to race.
I don't really know why as, especially at Wellingborough, a well prepared and set up RTR car is often faster than a scratch build.

Cheers.
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QUOTE (stoner @ 6 Apr 2012, 18:48) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>why dont clubs have a RWYB night for some of the radical cars to race, it could be quite entertaining. john
There are quite a few classes around where wire and brass scratchbuilt chassis are eligible. Most of the Falcon - Pro series classes and D3 being examples. In the open chassis classes, wire and brass scratchbuilt chassis are eligible but not necessarily competitive with laser cut steel chassis.

Clubs race what their members want to race. Different clubs race different classes so it's difficult to generalise. No point in trying to organise a race if only one or two people have the cars.
 
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