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Hello, I own Scalextric. But wonder about buying NINCO WICO. I drive only without magnets. GT cars and Camaros mostly.

I want NINCO because of better electric connection, quality and a bit wider track. But I will also drive on another track that is Scalextric.

People say it has so much grip, people also say Scalextric are like ice. I like Scalextric after you have trued your tires and some tuning, I like that you actually have to drive your car, brake and have the possibility to do nice powerslides, but if you do not true the tires, yes, it is very slippery. The electrical connection is not the very best though.

Now, HOW grippy is NINCO? I have not found an answer for this, just that the track is like Sandpaper, wears tires out, impossible to drift, and it is so grippy that the cars flip over in the turns. Now this sounds horrible to me, is it really that coarse and grippy surface? Sounds not fun at all.

Big part of the fun comes from tuning the cars for me. With stock tires. I do own Urethan tires and axle kits etc. and that is fun too, but in another fast way.

Another thing is the somewhat uncertain NINCO future, and ARC AIR seems like an maybe smarter way to go, but that NINCO track seems so much better, except if it has TOO much grip. I do have a lot af Scalextric track, more than I have room for. Carrera is too big, and even rarer than NINCO.

So in short, how much grip does it have, is it even possible to spin the tires at all?
 

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The Ninco track has much more grip than Scalextric, but the cars still slide around the corners, and no, they don't flip over in the corner. It's been chosen by many clubs which says a lot I think. I you have / know SCX classic track, it will give you an idea of the grip.
 

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The Ninco track has much more grip than Scalextric, but the cars still slide around the corners, and no, they don't flip over in the corner. It's been chosen by many clubs which says a lot I think. I you have / know SCX classic track, it will give you an idea of the grip.
Thanks, yes, I also have seen that "Pro" races are often raced on Ninco, must be for a reason I would think! I think I am gonna order a Ninco track, it is on christmas sale now, and if Polistil/Policar are coming back next year, maybe there will be more stuff to spend money.. Eh, I mean burn all my Money on... Hehe.. I have Scalextric Sport.
 

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When Ninco released their track system about 1990, their marketing was that it was to be the best possible club track.

Being Spanish, they were competing first against what we call SCX track - same molds as Scalextric classic.

Among the key things they marketed on were:

- wider lane spacing,

- better electrical contacts, (they built a test track 2.2km long in a gymnasium and ran cars on it without any power taps)

- more robust actual construction,

- A bit better resistance to corrosion at the joints and on the surface than Scaley and SCX (Carrera is best esistance, having a lot of chromium in the steel)

- Isolated rails to eliminate short circuits, and

- better grip for non-mag racing (with the tyres which were available in those days) [my subtext]

It met all those criteria for non-mag club racing, and as a result, snared much of the new and replacement tracks market for clubs in Europe other than of course, Germany.

Some people do not like the textured surface, and I think with the modern soft tyres and tuning, it is possible with really well set up, higher or narrow saloon cars people may experience flip overs - but then the same goes for wood. I have barrel rolled GT1 cars on my wood track.

In practice, it is more grippy than SCX/Scaley classic, or Scalextric Sport and Carrera, but nowhere near as grippy as wood can be.

I think that whatever track you use, you set your cars up so they go well on THAT.
As for tearing up tyres. I ran a 24 hour digital enduro in UK earlier this year, and I think we changed rear tyres once, maybe twice tops. That is either 8 or 12 hours running time per set with unglued tyres, doing 16 - 17 second laps on the DISCA Le Mans track which is huge, and cornering speeds high. http://www.officialdisca.com/about-us/

One key thing is dust - the equivalent of "marbles" in 1:1 racing. Dust kills grip. Smooth tracks succumb to dust easily, textured track scrubs it.

Note the new Policar track surface for home sets and club racing will be similar to Ninco, and the same lane spacing. They also intend to offer an adapter between the two systems.

That company - sister of Slot.it, will have put huge time into considering their surface properties.

I think Ninco will be a good track system for you.
 

· ParrotGod
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I regularly race on Scalextric Sport track and wood with copper tape.

I spend a lot of time to prepare tyres for my wood racing but for Scalextric track it is a much simpler process.

I have also raced on several occasions on large Ninco tracks: yes there is more grip but for me its surface is less consistent than scalex. This means that I get random deslots.

My suggestion would be to keep you scalex track and wait a bit longer to see what Policar brings out - unless you can get a very good deal on a lot of ninco track.

Also, if you are in analog forget about the ARC Air or Ninco WICO or whatever out-of-the-box carp is there: just get a proper analog controller and connect the track directly to the power supply (you would need also a way of counting laps).
 

· David H
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4,398 Posts
I use Ninco for my home track and race on Scalextric Sport at my club, all without magnets and only ever on the cars' original tyres. Each track has pros and cons, but if I could choose only one, I'd choose Ninco.

Scalextric Sport:

Positives: smoother and flatter than Ninco; rails flush with track surface; requires marginally less space than Ninco.

Negatives: poor connectivity; narrower lane spacing; maximum of 8 lanes rather than 10; less grip than Ninco with most box-standard tyres; borders have raised curbs which can be a problem if you're drifting cars with minimal ground clearance.

Ninco:

Positives: excellent connectivity; adequate grip with most box-standard tyres; caters for up to 10 lanes, so has a greater range of curves to choose from; borders sit flush with track.

Negatives: The track isn't very flat and you need to be careful when buying new track pieces. All of those I've bought in the last three years were made in China and have been poorly manufactured with dips and bumps. The rails are flat, but the plastic alongside them isn't. This can be a problem in corners and is a big problem on long fast straights where the bumps can and do bounce cars out of the slot. Older "Made in Spain" Ninco track was flatter and I've ended up binning most of my "Made in China" straights and buying second-hand "Made in Spain" stuff instead. I've heard (although not experienced for myself) that the most recently manufactured track is as flat as the old stuff was. The rail sits very slightly proud of the track surface.

Ninco track is more grippy than Scalextric Sport, but the difference isn't night and day. If a car slides on Scalextric Sport, it'll slide on Ninco too, just at a slightly higher speed. Tyres wear more quickly on Ninco, but not unduly so. The only exceptions to that in my experience are the standard tyres fitted to Revell/Monogram and NSR cars. In those cases I've completely destroyed a set of tyres in less than an hour's running on Ninco.

As I said at the outset, my choice would be Ninco, but that's with the caveat that you'll need to check in person what you're buying. The bumpy Chinese made stuff is very unsatisfactory and will cause as many problems as it solves.
 

· re member
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One thing I remember about running on plastic (Ninco) track is the noise.

No one seems to mention it.

Which is quieter...Scalextric or Ninco

Clacketty clack Clacketty clack Clacketty clack Clacketty clack Clacketty clack Clacketty clack etc
 

· ParrotGod
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I would say that they are pretty much the same...it really depends on how deep your guide go.

However I cannot say that is something that we really notice much.
 

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It is probably mentioned somewhere but you can use the Ninco "chicane" to connect to Scaley Classeic/SCX and then in combination with the C8222 adapter to Scalextric Sport.

WICO is no longer produced but ARC AIR might be an option.
 

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Ninco has indeed a piece of track to combine their track system with Scalextric / SCX classic, but the tracks being of different width, it is not that easy. I think that's why Scalextric choosed to keep the same width as classic when they designed their Sport system.

I've read that Slot.It will have the same width as Ninco.
 
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