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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all,

Both the NC-1 motor in my McLaren F1 and the NC-11 motor in my Megan Cup car have a very irritating habit when racing in our club classes for these cars. On the main straight you hit full throttle and they take off but then slow down. They won't run at full throttle for more than an instant.

If I release the throttle and mash it again, the cars take off like scalded cats... and then slow down again.

This problem doesn't affect anyone else's NC-1 or NC-11 motors.

We run on Ninco at 14v. I use a Truspeed controller. I'm about 0.9s off the pace on an 11-second lap, having to constantly pump the trigger to get any forward progress!

Would removing the green 'choke' from the wire 'twixt motor and guide make a difference?

Any thoughts would be welcome. I'm baffled.
 

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Have you tried altering the curve position on the controller?

It may be you have it set in such a way that the peak power is reached before the full trigger travel has been reached, hence, the power starts to drop off beyond for instance the half travel point

It seems strange that differing motors are behaving the same, or you could try a basic controller 'Parma' or a simple club controller to see if the motors do the same, at least then it would determine whether it is car or controller.

Regards

Phil
 

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Try Phil's tips first

If it turns out not to be a controller issue it could be motor problems. On occasion I've seen similar faults with that sort of motor, but as Phil says, two developing the same fault at the same time would be surprising. (Whatever the brand of slot car those sorts of motors are made for they originate from the same few factories in China and have a lot of common parts so can exhibit similar faults.)
 

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I had a similar problem with the NC-11 in my Lancia 037. I ended-up buying a replacement motor from Pendle's. Haven't had any repeat................ Yet.
 

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Yes have had this. A few times. Buy a shot glass and some lighter fluid ( or equiv.) dunk the motor in and run it for a minute of so. Let it dry and re lubricate.

No it will not explode nor set your house on fire ( have to add this as there are a lot of safety agony aunts on here)

Last resort dismantle the motor and clean between the comm segments with a tooth pick.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for the answers everyone. I'll work from the top downwards and see how they come along. Certainly all the running gear is as tight as a drum, it's definitely an output issue rather than the oily bits!

Does removing the green 'choke' have any effect or is that just an old husband's tale?!?
 

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What you are still using the green choke. I thought everyone had switched to the orange one!
 
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Rich Dumas
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Possibly dust from the motor brushes has gotten caught in the slots in the commutator causing a short. That is not an unusual problem and it can sometimes clear up on its own if you get lucky, if you are not lucky the motor might burn up if the track has a big power supply. You can try running the motor in a liquid for a short time as has already been suggested. You could also give the motor a shot with some electrical contact cleaner while it is running. You should use a cleaner that is plastic safe if the motor will be in the car. You will need to get the spray directly on the commutator, there should be small holes in the motor case or in the endbell. Sometimes the dust is too difficult to dislodge, in that case you would have to take the motor apart and scrape out the slots with thin, stiff plastic.
 
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