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DT
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Who is going to be the first to make a slotcar of one of these?

Nissan DeltaWing experimental racecar to be powered by Nissan 1.6-litre DIG-T engine technology in this generation's most revolutionary and exciting motorsport project
  • Nissan leads efficiency charge as founding partner of project
  • Innovative new racing car to run at Le Mans with Nissan technology
  • Nissan DeltaWing will act as test bed for new road car technologies
  • Drive for efficiency will see car use half the fuel of its conventional counterparts, bringing Nissan "PureDrive" principles to the track
  • Initial backers include racing legends Dan Gurney and Don Panoz, concept designer Ben Bowlby and Michelin
  • Special invitation from ACO to occupy 'Garage 56'
  • Car to wear number '0' and run outside race classification




LONDON, United Kingdom (13 March 2012) - Nissan is aiming to change the face of endurance racing forever by becoming a founding partner in the most radical motorsport project of its time - Nissan DeltaWing.

A highly-advanced and hugely-efficient Nissan engine will power the remarkable DeltaWing car as it races in anger for the first time at the legendary Le Mans 24 Hours (16-17 June).

While Nissan DeltaWing will not be classified in the 2012 Le Mans 24 Hours, the Company is looking to showcase the pioneering technology that will show one potential direction for the future of motorsport and will feed into the research and development of future technologies, that filter down to Nissan's road car product range.

A race-prepared 1.6-litre four-cylinder engine, featuring direct petrol injection and a turbocharger, will power Nissan DeltaWing, which is half the weight and has half the aerodynamic drag of a conventional racer.

With innovation at its core, Nissan was a natural partner to be invited into the DeltaWing family by the existing group of core partners - US-domiciled British designer Ben Bowlby, American motorsport entrepreneur Don Panoz, the All-American Racers organisation of former US Formula 1 driver Dan Gurney, Duncan Dayton's two-time championship-winning Highcroft Racing team and Michelin Tyres North America.

The engine, badged DIG-T (Direct Injection Gasoline - Turbocharged), is expected to produce around 300hp, sufficient to give Nissan DeltaWing lap times between LMP1 and LMP2 machines at Le Mans, despite having only half the power of those conventional prototypes. It features the same technology found in Nissan road cars, such as the range-topping Nissan Juke DIG-T.

"As motor racing rulebooks have become tighter over time, racing cars look more and more similar and the technology used has had less and less relevance to road car development. Nissan DeltaWing aims to change that and we were an obvious choice to become part of the project," said Andy Palmer, Executive Vice President, Nissan Motor Co., Ltd.

"But this is just the start of our involvement. Nissan DeltaWing embodies a vast number of highly-innovative ideas that we can learn from. At the same time, our engineering resources and commitment to fuel efficiency leadership via our PureDrive strategy will help develop DeltaWing into a testbed of innovation for Nissan."

"This announcement gives Nissan the opportunity to become part of a ground-breaking motorsport project and one which could shape the future of the sport," he added.

Nissan DeltaWing concept originator and designer, Briton Ben Bowlby, said: "Nissan has provided us with our first choice engine. It's a spectacular piece. We've got the engine of our dreams: it's the right weight, has the right power and it's phenomenally efficient."

Nissan DeltaWing is unlike any other racing car currently on track. The driver sits well back in the car, almost over the rear axle and looks ahead down a long, narrow fuselage to narrow twin front tyres, specially created for the car by tyre partner Michelin. With a rear-mounted engine, the car has a strong rearward weight bias, which makes it highly manoeuvrable, while its light weight and slippery shape make it far more efficient.

Its innovative design and forward-looking technology have encouraged the Automobile Club de l'Ouest (ACO), the organisers of the famous Le Mans 24 Hours, to invite the car to run in this year's race from 'Garage 56', the spot in the pitlane reserved for experimental cars. As it doesn't conform to any existing championship regulations, Nissan DeltaWing will not be eligible to challenge for silverware and will carry the race number '0'.

Nissan's expertise has been applied to the development of the engine, in order to make it light and efficient enough to prove the philosophy behind the concept can work in 'real-world' motor racing. The Company, always among the first to embrace such radical ideas and surprising new performance innovations, has promised to apply key learnings from the experience to inform strategies for its PureDrive aerodynamics and efficiency package for road cars, as well as its overall research & development programmes.

Dan Gurney's legendary All American Racers organisation has built the DeltaWing. The new car continues the California organisation's incredible legacy as a race car constructor which has included 157 different cars built - earning major victories in Formula 1, sportscars and the Indianapolis 500.

Paul Willcox, Senior Vice President, Nissan in Europe, said: "Nissan is a very innovative, forward-thinking company prepared to take a risk or two. And exactly the same applies to Nissan DeltaWing. Our involvement in the project shows the boldness of Nissan from an engineering and innovation mindset."

The first two Nissan DeltaWing drivers to be confirmed are British Sportscar racer Marino Franchitti and Nissan's reigning FIA GT1 World Champion Michael Krumm. The car will make its first public demo laps at Sebring, Florida, at 12.30pm local time on Thursday, March 15.
 

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QUOTE The engine, badged DIG-T (Direct Injection Gasoline - Turbocharged), is expected to produce around 300hp.

I wonder why only 300hp? it's 1.6 turbo charged should be good for a lot more than that.

I wonder why Andy Palmer said this

QUOTE racing cars look more and more similar and the technology used has had less and less relevance to road car development.

Maybe because Nissan doesn't use any racing car technology in road cars like say DSG by VW, etc.. it leaves it's sister or or is it brother Renault to do that.

If you look at the technical partners you can see in what market this is aimed at fostering interest in Nissan cars.
 

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Since a lot of racers set their cars up to "tripod" it may work very well. (Isn't "Tripod" what it is called when the front don't touch the track?)
 

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The challenge in the recent years of racing has been that even the smallest opportunities for development have lead to unsustainable increases in cost. Technology has risen to the point where a race car can be constructed that has performance capabilities well beyond those sustainable by the human body. Compared to the automotive advances during the post-war period to 1970, or even the aerodynamic advances from 1970 to the end of the group C era, the last 20 years has been almost stagnant in regards to race car development, primarily due to the aforementioned reasons.

Like it or not Motorsport needs change to survive. Even NASCAR has entered the 70's with the introduction of EFI. The charge towards efficiency might not be as sexy as earth-shattering horsepower or aerodynamic appendages, but it is the only direction in which is sustainable and relevant.

I can't help but see the Delta-Wing car the same way the old-guard looked at Jack Brabham's ride when he showed up at Indy. In the end Jack was right.
 

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Ray
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Great great innovation for auto sports pitty F1 was not leading the way but then Le Mans is faster, longer better!!!

Haven't we been racing thinggies for some timew now?

Ray
 

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QUOTE (Abarth Mike @ 17 Apr 2012, 12:24) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>I wonder why only 300hp? it's 1.6 turbo charged should be good for a lot more than that.

Just thought I would add that in 1957 MG were getting 290 bhp @ 7000 rpm out of a 1489cc Supercharged MGA Twin cam engine. That would give us 311 hp for 1600cc. So much for 55 years of progress.
 

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Horlicks Hero
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Yes, but what was the fuel efficiency of the MG ? From what I've seen of this machine, it's an attempt to maximize many factors. Sure, you could get lots more ponies out of the motor, but how many more refuelling stops would you need to make ? This is an insanely impractical project for short sprint races, but as an endurance racer, it's just crazy enough to work.
 

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It's possible to get a LOT more power from that powerplant. However it's not an official entry and is an experimental programme that's been granted Garage 56 out of 55 official starters.

I'm sure that Nissan will run it with full 'juice' at some point, but the fact that it's likely to be running at the same pace as the top LMP2s and slower LMP1s with only 300 horses is something to crow about.
 

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QUOTE (stoooo @ 6 May 2012, 18:06) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Yes, but what was the fuel efficiency of the MG ?

Well it ran on an alcohol cocktail so probably gt rubbish fuel economy. Like any vehicle that uses ethanol or ethanol diluted gasoline the Nissan will get poor gas mileage as well unless Le Mans mandates "real' petrol.

300hp takes 300hp worth of gas, if it is has a really low Cd value then there will be a little saving on the straight.

Of course if Nissan is a diesel then like Audi then it might get great fuel economy.
 

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wow! i love the shape. thats one radical ride. i,d love to carve a master for this, but sadly beyond my skills. i wonder if a resin maker, will bother to make a body for this. i,d certainly buy one. even a manufacture might bring one out, but that would take a couple of years to reach the market.just decided i might have a go at this using wood lots of putty and parts blagged fom other cars. any body got the wheel base and front rear- track dimensions of the real car. it will then be scaled using a rule[old skool way] i,ll see how i get on, in my first foray into the black art of carving. john
 

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So 2 hours in to competetive running it has hit the 3:42 target time set by the ACO, like the guy further up the thread said about rear engined cars, all 'normal' racing cars are looking conceptually old fashioned from today.

Reminds me of when Radicals started setting outright lap records around the UK nearly 20 years ago mixed with what it must have been like to see the Lotus 78 in era.

Given they have been given a "please don't go faster than x on the Mulsanne" instruction wonder how faster it could go?

On another note fair play to Toyota, the petrol/diesel rules were fair after all.
 

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It was interesting to hear on the TV today that the idea was actually proposed by the ACO. I assume Automobile Club de l"Ouest and Nissan where the only ones so far to take up the idea or the challenge.

So which part of the idea or concept is ACO and which part is actually Nissan (or Renault?) is unclear.
 

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Hi AbarthMike, the answer to your question is none and very little.

The concept is a product of Chip Ginassi Racings R&D department, the design being done by Ben Bowlby, it is based on a spare AMR1 (aston martin) tub built by prodrive, the car was built by Dan Gurneys AAR in the US and run by experienced former Honda sportscar team Highcroft and Michelin made it possible by agreeing to make the unique front tyres.

Nissan came on board very late by providing engines (from a Juke of all things) for Ray Mallock Ltd to turn into race engines and one assumes some funding. The ACO did provide a platform for it to be run in that they invited it to Le Mans so credit to them and Nissan for making it happen but the price of those engines does indeed appear to be, pretending it's a Nissan.
 

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Mark R-E
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ACO have had garage 56 for a couple of year now for new concepts. This year was the first time it was taken up and there were three applicants.

The spurned IndyCar concept got the nod over Yves Courage battery concept and another I don't remember.

All comparisons are a little pointless as no doubt Audi, and others, can make a much lighter LMP1 but it has to meet the minimum weight for its class.
 
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QUOTE (Mr Croker @ 14 Jun 2012, 10:48) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>ACO have had garage 56 for a couple of year now for new concepts. This year was the first time it was taken up and there were three applicants.

The spurned IndyCar concept got the nod over Yves Courage battery concept and another I don't remember.

All comparisons are a little pointless as no doubt Audi, and others, can make a much lighter LMP1 but it has to meet the minimum weight for its class.

what he says..
 
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