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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a copy-writing question. Don't worry, it's on topic.

I'm planning to offer some resin cast figures, wheel inserts and assorted scenic items in the near future and I'm currently working on a website as well as working on a line of castings. I'm working with a web site developer (my website in trade for artwork and design work) and I think I'm going to have to either write the copy beforehand, or be a bit stricter. One line of copy she seems intent on is: "Cast resin accessories for the miniaturist" This strikes me as overly cutesy, and unlikely to resonate with potential customers. If you were looking for bits for your scratchbuild, would "miniaturist" be a turn-off for you, or could it spur you on to look further?

I'm hoping to appeal to other modellers too besides slot cars, but this is where my main interest lies.

So, if I may ask, what would you look for when googling for driver and trackside figures, and other little cast resin bits?

Moderators, f I am violating any terms of which I am not aware here, please feel free to delete this I'll understand.
 

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One petunia in a field of onions
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The use of the term 'miniaturist' may open things up beyond where you're aiming, which wouldn't be a bad thing. I know what you mean about the word though, it irks a little, although I haven't quite managed to work out why.

Actually, I think the aversion to 'miniaturist' is because it feels fussy, dainty, like something one would find on Antiques Roadshow.

But 'miniaturist' does cover a broader expanse than just 'modeller'. It encompasses the gaming world, collectors, diorama modelling and even those folks doing dolls houses (now there's a mob I don't understand).

It could also be that she sees it as having more of a feminine appeal than 'modeller.' Don't know, that might be a bit left field even for me.

I'd be asking her what the term means to her if she's insisting on its use.

Embs
 

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One petunia in a field of onions
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I know where you're coming from, guys, but I wouldn't be discounting the "doll house" folks, even though I'm the one that brought them up. They seem to have sh'loads more money to spend than the rest of us.

You definitely want to use terms that will sit happily with all who are likely to relate to them.

And, having recently been looking for things like 1:32 scale farm yard cats and other such things, the most detailed items are listed as 'miniatures.' Miniature tends to implies high detail on a small scale.

However, the term 'miniaturist' just doesn't have the same effect. I guess that's one of the oddities of the English language.

Did that make the water nice and muddy?


Embs
 

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Gerald Lambourn
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Our 1/24th scale dolls' houses rapidly turned into architectural models, and was something where Claire and myself could work together, some of those skills rubbed off on the station for Graham Lane. use of the word "miniaturist" will give your web-site more hits so use several of the terms discussed, that way you get more hits via Google. And I am interested in the products too. GeraldL
 

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David J
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QUOTE (Porsche Racer @ 10 May 2011, 04:50) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>"for the Miniature Enthusiast"

Makes me think of enthusiastic small people, I know it's wrong on so many levels but the first thing that came to my mind was a dodgy porn film......!! Snow White and the seven....... what was it again.......?..


I think the term "model maker" sums it up much better and with less fuss.
 

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Datto, hi.

"Cast resin accessories for the miniaturist"?

If I was looking for scale figures or buildings I would not have used any word in the above sentence in my search criteria. In addition, I would argue that there is a syntax error in the construction of the sentence - you can't tag an accessory to a 'miniaturist'. It does not make sense.

Your keywords that will be buried in your website for the search engine trawlers to collect need to be in plain text - they do not collect graphic info. What you present on your site in terms of content will not necessarily work for you when it comes to climbing the Google ladder. Search Engine Optimization is a skill set that does not always go hand in hand with a pretty website. Increasingly, SEO is looked at as a separate functioning discipline.

I'm with DJ - a Miniature Enthusiast brings to mind an unusually minded person that prefers to witness vertically challenged persons performing reproductive acts for specialist entertainment reasons. A cast resin accessory for this sort of recreation is somewhat eye-watering.

Stick with 'Scale figures', 'Scale buildings', 'Trackside accessories' etc with the appropriate scale - 1:24, 1:32 as a qualifier. That will do the job.

Jules
 

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I suppose the key thing is how Google will work here. What keywords will Google pick up on when people search for their modelling supplies online.

'Miniaturist' isn't a term I would have thought of entering when searching for scale figures etc. Indeed, if you enter this phrase into Google the top search results seem to link to sites devoted to miniature portrait painting or doll houses. Then again, I am looking at this from a very Slot Car biased perspective.

That said, this is online advertising, and you're not limited by space/cost as you would be with print advertising. As GeraldL suggests below - use a number of phrases to ensure maximum exposure.
 

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I agree with endbell - 'miniaturist' makes you think of Nicholas Hilliard and Elizabethan dandies. A verb would be helpful such as 'cast resin accessories "designed" for the miniaturist'. And 'miniaturist' might be replaced by 'miniatures collector' which presumably is what this target person is.
 

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Marc, when i am looking for figures, as I sometimes do, I have found it not only necessary to be very specific ie '1/43 figures', but also to try variations such as '1/43 people' and 'o' scale figures, and even then I dont always find all the figures available. I always try to be broad thinking when I search so as to find even fairly obscure listings, but I have never considered the word 'miniaturist' as a search word, maybe I should try!

It obviously depends on which scale the item/s you are offering are aimed at, but I would think that starting your title with '1/32' or '1/43' etc would channel your goods to the people that would be likely to buy them.

Good luck with the new business and website, which I look forward to seeing.

Regards, Lloyd
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Thanks for all the valuable feedback. The talk of search terms is extremely valuable, and is reminding me of when I got back into this a couple years ago, I was having a devil of a time sometimes using the search features on the boards because of a jargon gap. Making up words would certainly muddy the waters.

Between Endbells and Jules' comments I can almost imagine inadvertently targeting miniature portrait painters who, for some reason are looking for resin belts and handbags. Not a broad clientele


In addition to being found, once there I don't want to irk anyone by being too 'twee' (is that the word?)
 

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Like EM, i have recently been looking around (and finding) lots of 1/32 scale modeling items and scenic materials.

Not sure about google, but on Ebay i simply type 1/32 and see what comes up.

Jules is right about optamising any web site - really important and a bit of a black art, but basically as long as you have enough key words in your opening statement you should get the hits you need.

Best of luck
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Thanks too on reinforcing the idea of making scales prevalent in both metadata and graphic design. !/24, 1/32,and 1/43 will up front in big type.
 

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From the freedictionary.com

miniaturist
1. Obsolete, an artist whose task it was to draw in red certain words or letters in manuscripts.
2. a painter of miniature pictures or portraits, as on china or ivory, characterized by fineness of detail.
 
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