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I've had my NSR Corvette a couple of months now (my first NSR) but as yet have not actually raced it, only a small amount of practice. Generally I'm very pleased with it but have/had a few issue's with it, have done most of the usual items of set-up, have just fitted a suspension kit only to find it goes much better with the pod screwed tight, replacing all the screws with the longer shanked metric ones has made a big difference, up to now if you loosened anything they started to fall out, however I wasn't best pleased with the alignment of the screw hole for the drop arm, nowadays that's not on with a quality product.

I had set-up the front axle and widened the track as various people suggested but thought that the axle holes were overly large and after adjusting the grub screws to set ride height I still thought there was way too much slop for and aft of the axle - almost a steerable front axle - having had some good practice at our track (North Staffs) last night I let one of the quick lads have a go (Rob Lyons) and he soon got it down to a 7.17 lap, anything below 7.20 is very QUICK he said, however he was appalled at the front axle slop.

I stripped the axle assembly down this afternoon to have another look, I've set-up the axle using a NSR 2-0mm axle spacer clamped in place by the grub screws, ideally a brass axle tube might be a better bet, then another smaller spacer followed by a larger washer and another NSR spacer, job done, absolutely no movement. It begs the question why is there so much movement as standard or am I missing something? no one appears to have mentioned this problem before.

Robert.
 

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As this thread had no replies I thought I would bump it to see if any new users had any feedback & assistance and to help me set up mine.

Just got my second NSR after this forum helped me get the Mosler running smoothly & it subsequently became my favourite magless car.
The Corvette has what looks like a similar anglewinder pod (to the Mosler) but this time it's not proud of the chassis although I put guide spacers in anyway to compensate for the bumps in my track joints. I haven't had to glue the tyres (yet) but was surprised to see the front axle floating and the guide on a pivoting wishbone. Out of the box, the pod screws were half a turn undone and the chassis screws tight. The incredibly powerful magnet has flown to the fridge at the speed of light.

Well, I'm a but disappointed with the performance on SSD analog mode but this is mostly due to the fact that the inherent APB power pulsing seem to be much more exaggerated than on other cars which makes subtle control more difficult (almost impossible even with my Truspeed) even dialing max power down to 75%.

So, any tips would be most welcome on chassis setup particularly with the floating guide & front axle, and also for SSD analog power pulsing compensation.

Cheers,
Chris
 

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Tom Brown (Scorpus Flex)
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I dont do digital myself but I have read here on slotforum it is better to swap out the digital powerbase with a normal analogue one when running more powerful analogue cars.

I havent noticed any front axle slop on my mosler, p68 or punto, although the p68 needed a spacer between body and chassis to stop the front tyres rubbing on the arches.
 

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Hi Ironman, It's not slop on the front axle, if you mean left & right movement; unlike the Mosler the Corvette front axle sits in a vertical oblong hole 2 or 3mm long with holes presumably for grub screws to set the height.
On the powerbase, I would like to keep the APB for the cool features which are also available in analog mode - lap timing etc
 

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Ray
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Hi just one little trick that we use regularly is to glue bearings on the inboard side of the front axle holder ensuring that the front ride height is correct. The Porsche 997 also has the axle movement that you are referring to however we have not noticed that this impacts the cars performance.

We have texted several NSR cars with and without front axle stabilisation (timber tracks) and there is very little difference on performance from our experience.

I am putting together the Audi R18 and a Corvette at the moment so will give them a run next week.

Ray
 

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To remedy the up and down movement of the front axle on the older NSR's, like the porsche 917 and the Ford GT MkIV, we use a piece of credit card that we glue to the inside of the front axle assembly and then we drill a hole just big enough to fit the axle at the height that you want it to be. To stop the side to side movement we use spacers or washers to steady the axle.

For the Corvette we used only spacers as the supplied grub screws are OK to steady the axle and set it to the proper height. I did find the standard supplied motor too aggressive for our Fleischmann track. After trying a Slot.it Flat Six R (still too aggressive) and a Ninco NC5 ( not aggressive enough), I settled on a Scaleauto 21000 rpm blackcan motor. When you do replace the motor, ensure that the supplied NSR pinion goes to the new motor, as I have found out! Although a new crown gear does not bankrupt you in one go, it can have a negative effect in your championship aspirations when your car stops running without any drive ...
 

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Nobby Berkshire
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Are you just talking about a desire to have everything tight and neat out of personal choice, or does the axle movement actually diminish performance?

If there is no diminishing performance then surely all you have to do is live with the axle movement.
 

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You could use brass 1/8 tubing, cut to the length of the axel, this method means that you will not need to use plastic washers, or glue, and still allows you to use the grub screws for up and down movement.
 

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Hi. I'm from Brazil and I used Google Translate, so have mercy! I have some NSR C7Rs and they have this problem in the front, where the axle has a set back and front ... in addition to the up and down where we can adjust with the screws that come attached to the car, without problems. I thought about putting a small 1/8 tube but gave up because I would have to use the fixed height and so I could have problems using the car on another track. So I decided to file the plastic part of the headlights and also remove the pin where we can adjust the height of the body, the main place where they get the tires. Maybe I can put a picture later of it. Therefore, I leave here my email: [email protected] or my whatsapp number +55 13 9 99771 1974 for those who want to contact me and get photos and other chats about the C7R. Big hugs to everyone.

Gustavo.
 

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ParrotGod
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I think that I do not have your issue because I true and cone my front tyres.

First I true the tyres to make sure that they are round, then I cone them such that the outside diameter is larger than the inner (reduce friction but still provide stability in the corners).

FInally I cover them with CA glue to further reduce friction.

From your pics it looks like your front tyres are as the come from the box and they might be a bit too tall.
 

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David H
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3,722 Posts
Use NSR spacers to stop the fore-aft movement of the front axle. NSR make them in a variety of sizes. The one I've used in this photo is 4mm length. NSR part #4855

The front axle mounts in NSR chassis are designed so that the spacer won't push all the way through and fall out inside the car.

Some chassis are moulded with axle holes sufficiently small to cause the spacer to bind and hence restrict vertical movement, so very carefully trim away a tiny amount of plastic with a sharp modelling knife. Alternatively, buy a length of 1/8 tube, spin it up in the chuck of a drill and use abrasive paper to reduce its outer diameter by a tiny amount, then cut to your required length.

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ParrotGod
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7,809 Posts
I have never thought of (or even seen) using the brass spacers in the front axle! Nice tip!
 

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David H
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Nor had I until, endlessly puzzled by why some of the best club racers had almost silent cars, I got the opportunity to thoroughly inspect one of their cars. I learned plenty, most of which nobody will ever tell you once you start snapping at their heels on track!
 

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ParrotGod
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yep! I know what you mean...
 

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Kevs Racing Bits
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2,598 Posts
1/8" brass tube makes lots of axle spacers and 8BA washers are perfect axle shims.
 
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