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Premium Member
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi guys
has anybody ever tried both:
NSR electronic controller with variable brakes and sensitivity reg. compared to similar Professor Motor.
If yes what are your likes and dislikes.
I just ordered a P.M for Carrera with full optionals (PMTR 2063 with Variable brakes, sensitivity reg. and heat sink installed) from Electric Dreams and I am curious about your opinions.
Regards
Edo (Ducati ST4s rider)
 

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Edo, are you running on a home track? If so, the loaded-up P.M.s are a bit overboard. My basic P.M.s (running at home) barely warm up beyond room temp. over several hours of use. As for the braking, I jumped the resistor he installs to soften the brakes and they still don't have too much braking. For club use those features may be helpful, at home it seems a waste of expense. You will like the way they run any car, regardless of motor power, and the smooth, linear control across the running range. They "shame" most stock set controllers (as they should).

Enjoy!
 

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Premium Member
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hi Harry
I will be running on a new home Carrera 18 meters 4 tracks which will be ready in a couple of weeks. I am coming back to slot cars after almost 30 years and thanks to this forum, which I have been reading for the past 2 months like a little kid in front of a toy store window ( I am 52!), I think I was able to make the good choices, for what I want to achieve, in terms of slot products available.
As it is I will have 3 PMTR 2062, the "normal" Carrera type PM controller and 1 Gold PMTR 2063 with those options installed. This last one might be a bit of an exageration, as you rightly point out, but I made the choice based on the fact that one of my racing friends is an electronic engineer and he is building a handmade "secret weapon" controller which he promised will be a killer (possibly increasing voltage as he rides his car?A sort of a turbo? We will see, not that I understand electronics though). So I wanted to be ready

We will be driving tuned up Slot.it, Fly racers, Proslot Toyotas with no magnets and my personal secret weapon is a TSRF Bentley (he has not seen a slot car yet and I get to prepare all the cars myself since in the 60's I was racing Cox Cucarachas with 26D elaborated Mabuchis).
You say:
"As for the braking, I jumped the resistor he installs to soften the brakes and they still don't have too much braking"
but I do not quite understand if the PM controller has too little brakes or too much for your taste that you had to "jump the resistor".
Thanks Harry
Regards
Edo
 

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Cox Cucarachas? Before my time.....
The Professor explained to me that his controllers are too capable at braking. "The cars will stand on their noses" is how he put it. He informed me when I bought mine that I may want more braking and that the easiest way to try it was to jump (bypass) the resistor he puts in to lessen the braking performance. He believes less braking is better. I use the brakes. My style is fast entry and fast exit on the turns.

http://img59.photobucket.com/albums/v179/HarryPorsche/

Take a peek at what my speedway looks like and you'll understand the need for good brakes.....we like to blast down the straights. Alot of drag-racing between the turns. The track record is held by the "St. Alphonso" Renault F-1 by Scaley, at 4.300 sec. FLAT! The track is about 58 feet. Typical race times go around 4.8-5.0 sec. Slower with more beer.
Welcome back to the hobby and enjoy the hades out of it!

Cheers!
 

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Allan Wakefield
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Hey Harry, got a pic of the resistor you jumped and where it sat in the controller before you jumped it?

I wondered why my PM was loose on the brakes!

Edo - I have an NSR in the post so will do a review ASAP.
 

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Hi Swiss,
Being a dinosaur, I still use film cameras and must borrow a digital when I need to post .
. I will get out and take some pix and upload them when I can (soon), but its an easy enough description. On the left side (back) of the board, just above and forward of the trigger, the resistor is mounted horizontally. At the same points on the right side is mounted a circuit breaker. Leave the circuit breaker alone when you jump the resistor on the other side. I used a strand of copper wire and soldered it across the terminals of the resistor, cut off the excess and called it done. The Professor reminded me not to remove the resistor, just to jump it (why I don't know, but he's usually right about these things)(so I don't bother to ask
). Hope this helps, and I'll post pix soon.

Cheers!
 
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