SlotForum banner

1 - 20 of 56 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
90 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
so i've got aload of cars from about 20years ago, and having recently purchased my first sport track, i've noticed most of my old cars cant seem to get an grip at all on the track. ive tried 2x le mans, 3x F1, some old escorts, and none are able to grip the sport track like the gripped the vintage track.

anyone got any idea's or types of tyres that suit F1, le mans, xr3i's etc to help them grip, or is there a different method?

thanks in advanced

Darren
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,227 Posts
Have you put new tyres on your cars?
After 20 years the old ones will be past it.
Classic track does offer much better grip that the new Sport Track, but that shouldn`t stop you enjoying your old cars on modern track.
Cheers.
Try RSSlotracing for replacement tyres.
Kev
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
90 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
i basically ordered the same tyres that where already on the cars. ive noticed that the newer cars' magnet, really puls them down, where as the older cars, either dont have a magnet or the magnet is no where near as powerful as the newer ones
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,615 Posts
Just replace the tyres with new ones and enjoy some tail sliding action with your older cars! I have loads of older cars and run them all on scalextric sport track. New tyres make a big difference and if you clean them often, they will keep their grip for longer.


Matthew
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
10,109 Posts
Sorry Darren but you have the advantage of appreciating the decent levels of grip that you could get on the old classic track. New track is pants in comparison.
If you can get some rubber from the new range of cars - the Start type cars are good - that will fit your wheels then that will help, and then treat the tyres with some special oil from pendleslotracing and you will be back where you were in levels of grip.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
90 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
thanks for that riko. Its been frustrating, but its given me the chance to design a track which i've decided, will have one track of sport, and one track or classic, mostly so i dont need to mess about with my old cars to get them on digital, but the classic section, will sit ontop of the sport section. fun times ahead.

as for the grip, i couldnt believe the difference with the sport track being so smooth and older cars just cant go round one bend at a slow pace where they would be flyin round on the classic stuff.

as for the tyres, im guessing its just a like for like replacement with the start types eg. classic f1 the same as start f1?

thanks again

Darren
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
90 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
matthew, had already replaced the tyres, and as much as i enjoy sliding the back end out on the new 2 vipers i got, the old cars are just not enjoyable, there's no grip at all
 

·
Greg Gaub
Joined
·
14,656 Posts
Huh. I actually LIKE the grip level of sport track. Many tires hook up quite nicely on Sport, and if you WANT drifting action, you can still get it, unlike Ninco where you could run bare plastic wheels and get good grip.

but seriously, the softer the tire, the better the grip. The oil tip is a good one. WD-40 is a quick version of that. Or some Slot.it F22 or P6, or NSR tires. There are also many urethane brands to try, Yellow Dog being the most readily available to most people, and of course silicone. I have only one set of tires I wasn't able to improve with oil that I thought would, and that was a set of tires on an AutoArt car. They don't respond to anything.
Remember, if those replacement tires were made years ago, they might also be a bit hard, relatively speaking. The oil/WD-40 trick should do wonders for them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
90 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
lol Flip, i would maybe have to video record how bad the grip is...basically, as soon as i accelarate, the cars back end goes left and rite, and thats not even throttle half in. the tyres ive replaced on all the cars, about 6 weeks ago. hadent heard of any wd-40 tip, so will have a look for that now n try that. ive got a few autoart cars but theyre shelf cars, like alot of the newer ones ive got boxed.

thanks again

Darren
 

·
WRP World Champ 2015/2016
Joined
·
4,279 Posts
any old oil you've got knocking about will do Darren - just to improve matters. Obviously each oil behaves a bit differently.

I've got fantastic results just using some 3-in-1. Put a dollop on a tire and rotate as you rub it in with a finger. Leve it dry for an hour and have a blast to see the difference.

Trueing the tyres also makes a heck of a difference. Get a piece of rough sandpaper (about 80 grade or so) tape it to your track. Hold the car over it, rear wheels in the air, nail the trottle and gently lower the tyre on to it. Give it a bit of a wiggle side to side and look at the tyre again. the dark bits havent touched the sandpaper, the light bits have. Keep going till it's all uniform colour and then do the other wheel.

Roll the tyres across some sticky tape - I use packing tape, others use gaffer tape, and be astounded at the amount of muck that comes off.

If all else fails, start searching for new tyres again.

If you look on e-bay, there are loads of offers for neodynium (sorry for spelling!) magnets, if you really want to go the mag route.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
826 Posts
When I had Sport track, I found urethane tires provided the best grip. They need to be glued and trued 'though. I really don't like oiling my tires, I figure you just end up with all sorts of garbage on the track. Besides, unless you happen to be using some sort of traction compound on a drag strip, full-size cars do not run with oiled tires.

If you really want to try some magnets, let me know. I took them all out years ago, I can send you a few to try.

Randy
 

·
Greg Gaub
Joined
·
14,656 Posts
Well, the oil is meant to soak into the rubber, not provide grip itself, but I'm sure you know that.
The point is to make the rubber softer, just like racing tires are MUCH softer than regular road tires. The more grip you want in your car, the softer the rubber tends to be, and the faster they wear out, and the more expensive they are. Not surprisingly, that's a lot like how slot car tires are. ;-)
NSR Super/ultragrips are CRAZY good tires with grip to spare. They are also very soft, and perform best when cleaned with lighter fluid before a race, and treated with oil after the race. The same tricks don't work on all rubbers, but most rubbers (not urethane or silicone) respond to some kind of oil. WD-40 is a thin but fast penetrating oil. Fast results, but also short life. Other oils can take longer to penetrate, but also last longer. Some oils will cause some rubber to expand too much or even completely break down. I know people have used oil of wintergreen, and people have used suntan/screen lotion (SPF50+ apparently). I bet there are some that use baby oil. LOL. Heck, I've even seen people spray the track with WD-40 in one spot so that as cars pass through, the tires take on a little oil, and gain grip as they run. Crazy, I know, but true.
Anyway, don't be afraid to experiment. Worst case is the tires wear out too fast or it doesn't work at all, and you replace them with something else.
 

·
WRP World Champ 2015/2016
Joined
·
4,279 Posts
Trying not to hijack, so bare with me.

I know silicones are banned at most clubs and comps, I think because they muck up the track a lot, but urethanes? Not having experienced them I would think the following could be an issue:
1) Pick up dust and debris very quickly,
2) Hard to true without "blueing" them - i.e. quite a tough material to sand, and you'd have to sand them for so long they risk over heating and going hard at the surface,
3) Promote axle bounce (due to high elasticity)

Back on topic: Darren, have you also played a little with a blob of blu tack placed inside the body, usually just in front of the motor, to help with balance and traction? Experiment with weights and positions, I've got a few cars that are undriveable without but really good when I've worked out how much to put and where.

Enjoy fiddling and getting it all driveable,
Martyn
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
826 Posts
First, WD-40 is not oil, it is a moisture displacement fluid. Second, since we're not talking about sponge tires, I'm assuming it doesn't really soak into the tire, but disolves some part of the tire, and eventually leaches out.

"The point is to make the rubber softer, just like racing tires are MUCH softer than regular road tires. The more grip you want in your car, the softer the rubber tends to be, and the faster they wear out, and the more expensive they are. Not surprisingly, that's a lot like how slot car tires are. ;-)" The point is, rather than fooling with lighter fluid and risking getting all sorts of junk on your track, why not just do the same thing the real racers do and use better tires?

I'm not sure if these three comments where related to silicone or urethane but, just in case it was the latter...

1) Pick up dust and debris very quickly - not from what any of the guys I know have found. Even when they are dusty, they still work.

2) Hard to true without "blueing" them - i.e. quite a tough material to sand, and you'd have to sand them for so long they risk over heating and going hard at the surface - other way 'round, they are easy to true, at least the shore-40 most of the guys I know are using.

3) Promote axle bounce (due to high elasticity) - nope again. I don't think this is an issue with silicone either.

I clean my tires now-and-again with the same stuff used by photocopier repair people to clean the rubber rollers. Between races, I've seen some of the guys just clean them with spit. Not very sanitary but for the most part, it's not flammable.

Randy
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,183 Posts
If you start replacing the tyres on your old car you will have to replace the tyres on ALL cars that you use even new ones. The problem with sport track is it has no grip to start with, a cure is to paint it this will stop the need to change all tyres and allow you to run with no magnets or additional weght.

Zen
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
10,109 Posts
Oil does get absorbed by rubber, if you leave them in oil they will expand like mad.

I run very occasionally at Adrian Normans club Viking where they use silicones, and believe me you have to meticulously clean your tyres inbetween races or your grip levels are way off being competitive....

Spit seems to work on Ortmann tyres, oil on rubber and cleaning with sticky tape on silicones.
 

·
WRP World Champ 2015/2016
Joined
·
4,279 Posts
I meant urethanes Randy, as most clubs tend to ban the use of silicones. (EDIT** - I should have written "that I know or have read about" in there. Sorry).

Ref the "wd40 isn't oil" issue, I just looked this up on the online dictionary (which doesn't necessarily make it right! It just happens to agree with me and Greg). Lol.

oil (oil)
n.
1. Any of numerous mineral, vegetable, and synthetic substances and animal and vegetable fats that are generally slippery, combustible, viscous, liquid or liquefiable at room temperatures, soluble in various organic solvents such as ether but not in water, and used in a great variety of products, especially lubricants and fuels.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
826 Posts
WD-40 Seems it's both. I don't use it to lubricate, I use this instead: Nano.

I'm splitting hairs, I know. When I had Sport track, which I hated, I decided to get rid of the magnets and try tuning cars instead. Unfortunately, Sport track is kinda slippery and the Scaley power supply was always full voltage. I figured if I was really going to get into this hobby and be able to compete a bit with some of the guys I raced with for a short period, all of whom had wood tracks, I would need to make some changes.

I bought an adjustable power supply, real throttles (Professor Motor was the only option that was reasonably priced at the time) and learned how to make urethane tires. I made a drivers' station to replace the Scaley power track, removed the magnets and starting trying to learn the art of getting a slot car to run without mags. Lowering the power and changing tires were huge improvements. Was it expensive, you betcha! But, suddenly all of my cars became fun to drive, so I figured it was worth it.

I have all sorts of urethane tires at home, and they are easily available on eBay. If you want to try a pair or two, send me a PM with a list of cars you have. If I have tires that fit, I'll send them to you for the cost of postage and you can try them out. You'll need some CA glue and some sandpaper.

Many of the tracks around here use silicones and only silicones. The problem seems to be that as long as silicone is all you run on your track, eventually the track gets "rubbered in" and the tires work great. As soon as you run some other kind of tire, the silicone gets removed and the track needs to start over again.

I'll warn you that you should take what I say with a grain (or shaker) of salt because I think I may have a different approach than some others. If I need to add stuff to tires to make them work, I get new tires instead. If I need to make all sorts of mods to my track to make it work, I get new track (I'm into wood now). There are some things I don't mind tinkering with, but when it comes to the two most basic parts of the slot car equation not working, I figured it was better to just cut my losses and move on.

Randy
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
10,109 Posts
Randy your link says WD-40 is oil! "The long-term active ingredient is a non-volatile, viscous oil which remains on the surface"
 
1 - 20 of 56 Posts
Top