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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I got home from work yesterday evening and my 5 year old son decided he wanted to do some slot car racing, I couldn't be bothered to set up a complicated track that would need a lot of marshalling, so I quicky set up a short 2 lane AFX banked oval on the dining table, we had great fun, I gave my son a stock Marchon Porsche 935 with silicone tyres to use, I used a completely stock Tyco Dodge Charger, he could go round flat out on the inside lane, I had to drive quite hard to keep up with him on the outside lane, having more speed but not enough grip to take the corners flat out. The track consisted of 12" banked corner at the western end 24" straights and 9" banked corners linked by a 6" straight at the eastern end. Great fun, hopefully he'll want to do the same again tonight.
 

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Andy Player
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I think oval racing is great


We're having both our WHO Racing Nascar races running on big ovals this year and there's a bit of a buzz around doing some different racing. It's all new - what car to use, the set up for just left turns, a different rhythm of driving - who knows what's going to happen? And there are two trophies to be won for the drivers that get it right.

On a smaller scale, I'm building a 4-lane Tyco short-track flat oval to race anything from T-jets and X-tractions to Tyco wide-pans, LL M-cars etc. Again, there's all the tension and fun of close racing and the importance of car choice and set-up.

I know some people look down their noses at the Americans who race on ovals at home, but by reading their race reports you know they are having a lot of fun
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I was surprised how much fun the small oval was, we raced a big Tri-Oval at SCHORC, it was fun, but I think we used cars that were too fast as we all ended up feeling a bit dizzy, maybe we should have had shorter heats.

I'm thinking of a classic NASCAR meeting as a follow up to the Pancake Cup, pancakes on an biggish oval, with mildly banked bends.

If you need any Tyco 12" bends let me know I 've got loads.
 

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That video is kool

As some of you know I'm in the process of a track build and I'm thinking about putting a lid on the table once its done and having an oval on the underside so i can flip it over and race on it my problem is it can't really be banked as the track on the main table is going to have elevations and landscaping so is it worth having a flat oval.

cheers Wayne
 

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Andy Player
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A flat oval is perfect. It means you have to get off the gas in the corners, especially with the lower mag cars. This gives a similar driving feel to a 1:1 local short-track oval - even if those ovals are banked a little.

It's like I've said elsewhere, if you built an HO scale replica of a slow short-track oval like Martinsville, you would be flat-out all the way round - so it wouldn't feel like Martinsville at all.

One of my favorite US ovals is flat:


With Tomy track you be quite creative with the flat curves. With Tyco track that's available in the UK, you have a choice of 9 and 12" radius bends. But after a lot of running and racing, a six foot board with 3 x 15" straights on each side and 9s inside 12s at each end gives a great 4-lane racing track.
 

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I'm very interested in adding a regular oval-based round to the EAHORC calendar within the next couple of years. I intend to try and take this beyond the point of just talking about it and trying to make it actually happen. It sounds as if my timing is about right.

I am mindful that it is strangely all to easy to get these 'simplest' of tracks wrong in HO. I hated the ones I raced on in the early days, wobbly affairs with, wait for it, crossovers. Even when I won I never felt particularly pleased because it was all down to a policy of being a hooligan through them if another car was nearby. In front, behind, it did not matter, they lifted you didn't and they went straight to the scene of the accident.

Eventually I came to the conclusion they were just another device beloved of people who want to make the racing 'fair', in much the same way as crash and burn and giving the pole man a 50% chance of getting a rubbish lane because it was chosen for him randomly. Such thinking became anathema to me so ovals, being associated thereby, never got a decent crack with me. So, rule #1, no gimmicks. Just four lanes, no squeezes or other 'devices'.

I am not a fan of what I call flatvals either. They could be done right, but the ones I see are 8 and even 10 lanes and just look weird to me. A 4 or six lane one with long straights? It could work....

Of course the real deal would probably have some kind of banking. From the odd comment that comes my way from social networks I get the impression some people find the Rockingham oval up 'north' to be too easy. When you go that large and wide there is a danger the cars are flat chat. I am not as knowledgeable as some on here when it comes to Nascar, but it occurs to me that something like Loudon might be the model. To scale the straights would only need to be, what, 21 sections long? Laid flat they would not look far wrong either, very thin wedges would replicate the 1 degree banking.

With 7 degree banked turns it should be possible with lots of artistic license to make a track that has to be driven, with tweaking of the straights and power getting it closer to the ideal. 7 degrees is around 18mm on a four lane.

Pitfalls? Well, one could do all that and end up with a boring track (rider: a boring track with one car might be better with 4/6). Storing the banked bends, which would have to be sturdy and permanent. would create problems too.
 

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Andy Player
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We've already done a tri-oval at last May's WHO event.

This was the track:



18" curves on the top.

We did 2 minute heats and finals, with the 'A' final 3 minutes - that worked just right.

The Baldock's were racing that night and Tony's performance in his final was incredible - but even he needed to learn the track and how to squeeze every last 100th out of every braking and acceleration point. He did this better than anyone else. John F's huge experience of racing 1/5 scale RCs on ovals meant he was close.

There are some race format ideas we've had on and off our WHO Nascar thread. But ultimately it has to be about who can set up a car and drive it at the limit - no more, no less - and find the perfect rhythm, then that's what oval racing is about.

To get the equivalent with a real oval it would be necessary to look at how much the top Indy and Nascar drivers are lifting on the bends at circuits like Pocono, Loudon, Indianapolis etc. If it is quite a lot (which I think it is), then the radius of the bends and degree of banking need to correspond. Even 18" might be too much. 50" radius banked bends might look 'right', but if they are taken completely flat out, they are not that good for racing.
 

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Rich Dumas
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Oval tracks are boring when you run by your self, but they get a lot more interesting when you race. Some types of cars just belong on an oval track and I convert my road course to an oval for special events, like this one that was run under the lights.
http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v12/SLOT...ent=sizzler.mp4

I do tend to get dizzy running fast cars on a short oval, but the shorter the track is the more action there will be.
 

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Andy - I watched the video again for that round, and it pretty much confirmed for me that four lane ovals look better than the ones with more lanes. 4 lanes (and track calls) means we can also avoid the dreaded C&B


The D shape, Charlotte-esque, also looks the part. Now imagine that track with 18-20mm banking, and the track set into boards the same way as Andy W does with his demo track. Bingo!
 
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