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ParrotGod
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Ok, it is seems it is time to start a thread where we post O2 chipped vehicles.
Hope that this topic gets pinned similarly to the one in the SSD subforum.

To kick this off, I will start with something a bit extravagant: a Fly MAN Truck!


I got this one and Sisu from Branco. They have been tune with NSR baby king motors, slot.it gear and NSR rear hubs and tyres. The trucks have been with me since end of June but I didn't have too much time to play with them as I was full on preparing my entries for the DiSCA Euro series. Then I went overseas for a month.

This weekend between preparing my BA F458 white kit for painting, I got a bit of spare time to play with the MAN.
I love the MAN but it is the most difficult to chip because of the chassis is very narrow and there is limited space between the chassis the the rest of the body. To be honest this is not the first one that I have chipped. I have already done a MAN and a SISU with SSD F1 chips. This time I wanted to try with an oXigen chip. Two main challenges: how to fit the chip so that the antenna is still upright (or for that matter still attached to the chip given the really limited space) and how to install the hall sensor such that it is able to detect the magnets for the S/F line and pitlane.

Here is how I managed the installation



As you can see there is not much space. The chassis is not even wide enough to contain the widest part of the chip. So I had to trimmer down part of the side edges. You can see better in the pic below.



The Hall sensor is positioned in the front part of the truck where the chassis s wide enough to allow me to put the sensor in correspondence where the magnets on the track are installed. Lap counting has been reliable so far.
I might open up a hole in the chassis to improve detection in case I will notice missed laps.

You are wondering why I have put the chip so far from the front axle. Well the answer is below:



In the body, there is an empty box that represents the engine block of the real truck. It has enough room for the antenna, the capacitor and the two sockets for the lights and hall sensor. I had just to remove two beams connecting the two sides of the body where the block is glued on. You might be able to see better from this other pic



I had to also remove a bit of material on both sides of the body walls to let the chip fit properly.
Then I added a hole at the bottom of the chassis for the IR LED.
Here you can see better



I have measured the distance between the IR LED and the guide and is 37mm. I have already tested it on my SSD track and so far I have not missed a single lane change.

Next, LIGHTS! As I have said, I have done other chipping of these beats. For the MAN I discovered that the light boards of the scaley R8 fit perfectly with the front and rear lights of this truck. So I have taken the light boards from one of my R8 and wired them for braking lights in oXigen. Because the scaley light boards have resistors and diodes there is no need to add the light kit. They can be connected straight into the chip.

Here is a view of the wiring of the front lights



And here you can see the read board (on the far left hand) and the light connector coming through the body near where the chip is gong to be.

This is how it looks when all closed - it can be tighter but so far I cannot complain.



Lights on!
Front:


And back:



I think these trucks look really good. The MAN is for sure the most difficult one to chip. The SISU and Merc should be easier. The new Buggyra also should not be a big challenge. I am not so sure about the old Buggyra.
Anyway, this could be a nice class to race digitally. DiSCA should really look into putting together a spec for them. ;-)
 

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ParrotGod
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NSR R8

Here a fresh one: a NSR R8 out of the box.



Basically install procedure for nsr car.
To make the chip sits tight, I have removed with my dremel the magnet holder in the pod.
You can also see the Hall sensor here. To run on a "pure" SSD track you do not need it.


The chip is positioned in such a way that the IR LED shines through the hole in the pod for securing the car to the base in the box.
To protect the exposed parts on the chip from object on the track that might short it, you can put some transparent tape where the IR LED is.
An alternative would be to use an IR LED on wires that you can easily solder to the pads on the chip



For the lighting system, I have used the slot.it one. It was a bit difficult for the front lights to be placed in such a way that they would not touch the front wheels.
Also I had to open the plastic cover to let the LEDs shine through.
the rear ones were much easier to install. Also note that I am using the lexan interior and not the stock one.



I am not an expert in installing lights...this is my first attempt fitting them on a body that was not supposed to have them...Overall I think it worked out quite ok.
 

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ParrotGod
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Slot.it Alfa 155 DTM #7 - O2

This is an oXigen installation on the new Alfa 155 DTM by Slot.it.


The installation of the chip is pretty straightforward and there is plenty of room for the antenna and the Hall sensor.



To secure the Hall sensor to the chassis, I have followed Tamar's method of using a piece of heathshring glued to the chassis. To better route the stiff Hall sensor wires, I have added another piece in tandem.



Be sure to cover your motor with insulating tape to avoid that the Ferriteman's legs touch the motor can otherwise you will fry the chip.
Here also a pic from below the chassis to show how IR LED is positioned. The white stuff that you see behind the IR LED is a piece double side tape to keep the chip in position.

 

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ParrotGod
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Scalextric Bentley Continental with 3D printed chassis and AW config

This is for preparing a Scaley Conti using the shapeway chassis.



The image below gives you an overview of the chip instal. You can also notice that I am using the light boards provided by scalextric.
Using some fine wires, I have connected the red + and - black to the headlight pin on the oXigen chip.



Later I have done a small mods to have also brake lights on when the brake is pressed (or the throttle is released).
I have added a 400ohm resistor between the positive rear light and the positive head light coming from the chip.
However, since the oXigen chip has also a pin that output power when the brake is released (the one connected in the yellow wire in the pic) I have
soldered the yellow wire after the resitor: so when the car goes around the rear lights get power (as for the front lights) but the voltage is lowered by the resistor;
when the brakes are applied, the full power is supplied by the yellow wire bypassing the resistor.



The shapeway chassis has a variant that accept the SSD DPR chip. In my case, I had to put a hole through the DPR hatch to let the IR LED on the chip shine through.


Because of the anglewinder configuration, I could not use the original scaley interior. So I got one done by Munter (actually he sent me 10:) and detailed with some of the bits from the scaley interior

 
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Nice initiative Gio and an interesting subject to start the O2 chipping D-base. I will copy paste some of my cars into this topic as well.
As for the Man truck...installation looks good, I might have my concerns on the height of the hall sensor above the track, so far you've reported no missed laps.
I.m.o. I would mount the hall sensor lower, cut a hole in the chassis and mount the hall sensor with some shrinkwrap to the underside of the chassis.

with kind regards
Tamar
 

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O2 chip installation on chassis with a NSR pod
The installation follows more or less the same lines as what I posted for the Black Arrow F458 chassis. Here too, the most suitable position for the O201b1 chip, is just behind the front suspension mount.
If you don't want to use a seperate Lanechance IR led on leads, just enlarge the hole at the front of the pod for the chip mounted led to shine trough.
Its just outside the Slot.it advised margin...but it will work. Not only for the TA71S chassis but also for the Olifer3D chassis for the BA F458, and off course for all regular NSR AW pods.

To get the chip that far forward on the pod you do have to remove some material from the front suspension mount.
I have cut an extra slot in the retaining tabs so that I could rotate the suspension cup and mount it longitudally.

Here's a tip to make a quick change mount for your Hall sensor. Take a piece of heat shrink tube big enough to fit over the Hall sensor.
Shrink it, but not completely 100% tight, just tight enough so you need to apply a little bit of force to pull the heat shrink off again.
Use a drop of cyanoacrilate to glue the heat shrink on your chassis...and slide the hall sensor back in.


In order to place the chip low on the chassis you'll also need to trim the walls of the pod triangle and the pod magnet holder.
As with the Black Arrow pod, yopu have the choice to mount the chip on the chassis or on the pod.
With the triangular design of the NSR pod you'll have less surface to mount the chip on the chassis andyou can only support it at the front.
Here you can use the guide wires to apply a bit of tension to the front of the chip to keep the back clear of the pod.
As with all chassis, make sure that all the wires that go to the chip are flexible and placed in such a way that they don't interfere with pod/chassis movement.

with kind regards
Tamar

 

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O2 chip installation on a BA F458 GT3 chassis
A light and well detailed body with a fully tweakable chassis, by its performance the BA 458 GT3 has carved itself a good reputation in the analoge competitions where ever it ran.
However the architecture of the fully sprung motorpod is a bit of a hindrance when it comes to fitting an O201b1 chip.
There's a central beam running from the motor to the front suspension point..which is exactly in the area where you would want to place your chip.

Installation with an IR lane change led on lead wires
Matt was the first to tackle this problem and chose to mount the chip on top of the central pod beam just behind the front suspension mount.
To get the Lane change IR LED within the 35mm distance of the guide (as advised by Slot.it) he mounted a second IR LED via lead wires.
Drilling a hole between the front bodymount and the front suspension post.
As you can see on the image below left Matt has made it into a neat and compact package with a minimum of wire lenght.
At the motor side of the chip Matt placed a connector in the motor wires to facilitate and easy change of chip/ motor and or between analoge and digital running.
note for a more detailed description of such a connector; check this post

Richard has followed suit (see image below right) but still has some wire trimming to do.
Looks like he kept quite a bit of the IR LED legs, nicely insulated with heat shrink I must admit, as the LED sits right under the (metal) front axle.
But the legs & wires are a bit long which may hinder the pod movement with the chip installed.

note: Slot.it has a set with an IR led and wires (SP32), Surechange guides also sells IR LED's.



Image left courtesey mtucker66, image right courtesey southwestscorer

Height of IR LED above the track
If you use one of the 3mm IR LED's best practice is to glue a 1mm thick round piece of plastic with a 4mm ø on top of the chassis.
Drill the 3mmø hole through the plastic and chassis. This will give you more material to mount your IR LED in.
Chamfer the bottom of the hole to 4mmø and mount the LED flush with or just above the chassis bottom.
I asked Maurizio once what the ideal height above the track would be and he could not give me an exact answer.
The IR led has a conical beam, the lower you go the narrower the beam,meaning the shorter the time the led will shine on the LC sensor.(less time for data transfer)
The higher you go the wider the beam (longer time for data transfer), but with the increase of distance the power of the beam will become weaker.
Trail and error shows that its best to keep your IR led higher than the Chassis floor cause scratches on the led surface will definately disturb the IR beam.

Installation with the stock IR lane change led (needs to be tested)
Having the LC led on leads placed well within the 35mm range is the option that will guarantee the best lane changes, but its not the only option.
You could make do with the stock IR LED on the chip with just minor modifications to the F458 chassis.
Pictured below I've mounted the O2 chip in exactly the same position as Matt (just behind the front suspension mount) and drilled a hole in the chassis for the LED to shine trough.

The distance between the LED and the guide is 37mm, just 2mm outside the advised range.
I you shave 2mm of the suspension cup retainer tab you could move the chip even further forward and be be spot on.

To mount your chip as low as possible you can enlarge the slot in the pod beam so the IR led will fit within.
You can also reduce the thickness of the pod beam to ount the chip even lower, if you do this its best to use some epoxy to glue the two halves of the beam together.
Mount the chip on top with some double sided foam tape and you'll regain the rigidity of the beam.

Last but not least, if you add a second IR LED the one on the chip still functions, so there's a 3rd option...use option 1 and 2



To be or not to be (Chip mounted on the pod or on the chassis)
That is the question, and this is not a digital one, but a pure down to earth anologe chassis set-up question.
The O201b1 chip weights ≠ 3,5 gr (depending on the wires you use) so the question is do you want that weight on the pod or on the chassis.

If you were to choose for weight on the chassis here's what you could do. Mount two pieces of foam/ rubber/ plastic on either side of the pod beam to support the chip
Mount the chip on top with some double sided foam tape. Make sure that there's enough room for the pod to move freely under the chip.
With your chip now fixed to the chassis make sure that your motor wires are flexible enough so they dont limit the pod movement.


note: All the mods decribed above are covered by DiSCA GT3 rule 2.2: Chassis modifications to aid fitment of digital chip and/or light kit are allowed


Hope this is some help in preparing your Black Arrow F458 GT3.

with kind regards
Tamar
 

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ParrotGod
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Hi Tamar
Actually, moving the sensor underneath the chassis is a cool idea.
Are you able to pin this thread in this subforum?
 

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ParrotGod
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Fly Truck SISU - Type B1 chip

Here it is one of the easiest install that you can have: a Fly SISU truck. There is so much room in it that the chip looks so lonely in there!


Below you can see that the aerial, capacitor and lights/hall sensors connectors will not be an issue with the rest of the body work.


The hall sensor is also very easy to fit at the right off-set distance. In this case I used a piece of heat shrink glued the chassis.


I put a hole into the chassis to let the IR LED shine through.


Given the amount of room available I used the Slot.it lights kit on this one. First I shaped the red LEDs to fit in the rear body work of the truck


Then I installed them on the back side of the truck and passed the wires through the body work.


Below you can see the installation of the light board inside the cabin and the front LEDs.


And here is how it looks like with the light connector having enough lead to allow you to remove the body without taking the chip as well!


Job Done!

 

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ParrotGod
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Fly Truck SISU - oXigen Type A chip

Recently, I got the opportunity of acquiring 5 Type A oXigen chips.
After reading Gary's post on chipping an Alpine LMP with one of these chips I thought that they could be a good fit for the large trucks.
So I went back to my Fedex SISU and changed the chip.
As you can see in pic below, the install is pretty easy. There is so much space in these SISU trucks that really is a no brainer to install these larger chips.
They have a larger and taller capacitor compared to the Type B1. But still this is not an issue here.
Note the hall sensor install at 45 degree. The chip here was installed in a forward position. This is due to the IR LED being at the rear of the chip (nearer to the motor).


I took advantage of the hole for fixing the truck to base of the box to let the IR LED shine through. I just remove the extra material around it.


One note here on this Type A chip. My chips were produced in 2012 and they had ver 1.2 as firmware. What this means is that they operate on a different frequency and you cannot pair them to a controller with a version 2.xx firmware. Also, if you are running a Dongle with version 2.xx the BootLoader (BL) is not able to connect to the chips with version 1.xx
What you have to do is to change the Dongle firmware to 9.1.2 which is designed to upgrade a firmware version 1.xx to 2.xx. Once you have changed your Dongle to 9.1.2 version, you can use the BL to upgrade the firmware to the latest version 2.13 for type A. They are not as easy as the type B1 to connect to the BL. So you might need to try several times. For instance, in my case I had to try 4 times before this chip was able to connect to the BL.
With these chips it is important that the pickup wires and connection to the braids is solid otherwise it might drop the link with the controller. In mine here, I had to change the wires with thicker ones to allow a better fit on the picks up. Once I did that, the connection between the chip and controller has been very reliable.
 

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ParrotGod
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Fly Truck Buggyra - oXigen Type B1 chip

And here is my favourite of all the fly trucks: The Buggyra!
I got this one from the Kiwi version of eBay for $50. The truck needed some TLC to be race-able again.
But for the price I got it was a good bargain.
First thing that I like to do to all my racing trucks is to fix the motor to the chassis. Now, I do not like glue and tape because they are messy and not adjustable.
What I have done here is to make two dents in the motor holder and them put to 6mm M2 grub screws to fix the motor to it.


The Buggyra, similarly to the MAN, have a very narrow chassis and a lot of details in the upper deck. Installing the Type B1 chip here is not too difficult. But I have seen some German guys install a Carrera digital chip in one of these. This means that with a bit of hacking I could even fit a Type A chip.
Anyway, since I want to have this done quickly I decided to go for a Type B1. The idea is that the aerial, capacitor and connectors should all end up under the engine block of the upper deck.
Here is a dry fit pic of the type one sitting in its almost final position.


The idea is that the engine block is hollow and should have enough room for accommodating the tall parts of chip.
In the picture below you can see how the chip will fit under the upper deck.


I started by hacking away some of the ribs on the chassis. But instead of making completely flat, I just remove some 2mm of material in the area where chip will sit.


Next, I fixed the chip with bluetack on the chassis and put on the hall sensor and light connectors to have a better idea how much material to remove from the upper deck.
I started by removing some of the structure where the engine block sits.


In the end, I removed almost all the base where the model engine is attached.


In the pic above, you should be able to see that I have remove a bit of material from the side wall of the upper deck: this to facilitate the wires of the hall sensor to come out.
With the pic below you should see better what I mean. Basically, I decided to put the hall sensor below the chassis inserting it in a piece of heat shrink.
You can also see where I have placed the hole for the IR LED.


Here is a pic of the chassis with the chip fully connected.


And finally some pics with the body work on.
Left side:


Right side:


Front:


Although I have removed quite a bit of material to accommodate for the chip, nothing is visible from the outside. In the pic above you should be able to spot the aerial pocking behind the radiator between the collectors.
Here is another pic with the cabin on. Not much left to be seen:


Next I will install the lights and update this post (maybe with the help of the mods).
I am already working on Merc truck where I am installing a Type A chip. More to come!
 

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Slot.it Lola/Aston Martin LMP1 Chipping & Lights
With the upcoming Mega Monza event in mind, I thought it might be good timing to post this Chip & lights installation report for the Slot.it Lola Aston Martin LMP1.

I've borrowed the images and some of the text from Tom van Leekwyck's excellent post on SFI

This Lola was the first time that he chipped a car, most of the information on how to do so he found on SFI and the tutorials on the DiSCA website.

Its a good example of a simple and clean instalation, which he then applied to the whole car.

And with good result, digital debutants Tom and his team may have been, but that did not stop them from winning the first digital event they entered: The Suzuka 6hrs Endurance held on Jan 28 in Best (NL)

IMG_2338_zps2xxhq985.jpg


As you can see in the poicture above Tom managed to keep all the wires going to and from the chip as short as possible with as much seperation as possible to keep EM interferrence minimal. He used the stock Chip wires but added a PCB board connector in the motor cables for a fast motor change. Its a cool feature that I have used many times, but is not really neccesary for Digital running.
The connector does have an advantage if you need to test the car on a analoge track. With the connector you can leave to motor in the chassis and just remove the chip, or bypass the chip with a second set of wires with a connector that feed the motor directly from the guide.

(but do remove the connection from the chip to the guide)

Advisable, but not very visible on this image is to mount the chip on the chassis with some flexible double sided foam tape.

(if you look closely you can see a small white part of it just underneath the O2 chip) Sturdy as the O2 chip may be, there's a lot of vibration in a slotcar chassis running at speed..on a Ninco track. Anything to dampen those vibrations will be helpfull in keeping your chip safe and sound even in a hard crash.

What you can see is how Tom used shrinkwrap to insulate all the connections and connectors to prevent a possible short circuit.

Shrink wrap can also be used to mount the Hall sensor on the chassis. Just don't forget to mount the hall Sensor bevelled side down.

IMG_0013_zps6ek8u8rp.jpg


There's one thing that Tom had not done as he took these picture and that is to add a bit of support to the base of the Chip antenna.

As the antenna is soldered to the underside of the chip (Fig 1), the sleeve of the antenna can creep up as it bends (Fig 2)

So I always add a drop of 2K glue or hot glue around the base of the antenna to give it some support (Fig 3)

An even better way is to add an extra piece of shrinkwarp around the base before adding the glue. A dab of light colored paint on the tip of the antenna will help you guide it trhough the hole in the body or interior should you make one to keep the antenna as straight as possible.(Fig. 4)

Chip-antenna-bracing.png


Lights
Tom installed a light kit from Zmachine because he wanted both brake lights and exhaust flames. He used the #161BQ Z-machine set and attached to the motor wires to make it work.

If you use the Slot.it Sp16 or Sp 16c light kit you will have brake lights, just no flaming exhausts, but you can use the connector and mount that directly on centre socket of the O201b1 chip.

Regardless of what light set you use, for the wiring in the body its the same rule as for the chassis, keep them short and place them in the body so they don't interfer with any part of the chassis. As you can see Tom did that very well.

IMG_0014_zpsrb03qz5z.jpg


As for the body, Tom needed to adjust the interior, as his shop had no lexan interiour available for this car.
He had to make room voor the front motorpod suspension and the Oxigen Chip.
So he started cutting material fromunder the dashboard, just enough that the driver still has a torso and 2 arms, and replaced it with some lexan.
To give it a personal touch, he gave the driver a drinking tube and telecoms.

IMG_2357_zpsvobvavbz.jpg


So when you follow this guide your AMR Lola can looks as clean as this, nicely set up, no binding between body and chassis, ready to rock and roll.

IMG_0012_zpsafs9ctje.jpg


With kind regards

Tamar

p.s: Some of the modifications that Tom did on his chassis (removing material from the chassis/ motorpod to lower the weight and mounting the suspension to the front of the pod) are not complient with the Slot.it LMP class tech rules for the Mega Monza event.

images © Tom van Leekwyck
 

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Scalextric Audi R8 - O2 Chip

Here is a nice and simple chipping ........... feel free to click on an image to see it in a larger format ........
lmfao.gif


View media item 123362A standard R8 ....

View media item 123354The only modification was the LED on fly-leads ....

View media item 123346The chip was re-orientated by 90° so that it would fit in the space usually occupied by a DPR chip .........

View media item 123338
This shows the robust standard type of LED that does not need sellotape to protect it.

I have also chipped another 6x Audis and a further 7x Aston Martin DBR9s with this method; I guess a

further 14 sets of identical photos would not serve much much purpose ....
wink.png
 

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sml_gallery_11296_4178_13394.jpg


The chip was re-orientated by 90° so that it would fit in the space usually occupied by a DPR chip .........

Nice job there Greg, but would mounting the Hall sensor on the right bedpan not have been better here?. That would have kept the Hall sensor wires totally clear of the Motor wires.

with kind regards

Tamar
 

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These cars are for a BLST track and the magnets are fitted on the left so the HES has to go where it has to go .......... ;)

sml_gallery_11296_4178_13394.jpg


The chip was re-orientated by 90° so that it would fit in the space usually occupied by a DPR chip .........

Nice job there Greg, but would mounting the Hall sensor on the right bedpan not have been better here?. That would have kept the Hall sensor wires totally clear of the Motor wires.

with kind regards

Tamar
 

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Just the standard ones that work with Scalextric cars ............ :)

Hi Greg,

What LED's are you using for the offboard sensor?

Thanks

-s
 
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