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Premium Member
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166 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've been silently working in my RMS program for the last couple of years, but Im now taking a few months off, and see how much I can bring it forward. Ive now come to the Oxigen parts, tried a few things using the 3.11 firmware version for the dongle, and have a few questions about the Oxigen dongle protocol documentation.

The latest documentation is from 01/07/2016, and is for version 3.0. Are there any parts that are missing/changed for 3.11 (or that will be changed for 3.15)?

I havent actually seen anything that might be missing/changes, but Ive found some minor errors in the documentation:
  • In the TX (PC -> dongle) part and byte 0, the documentation for bit 5 and 6 (lap counting in pitlane, and pitlane lap trigger) are swapped. The documentation for bit 5 actually applies for bit 6, and vice versa.
  • In the RX (dongle -> PC) part, byte 5 is the total lap number low byte, and byte 6 is the total lap number high byte. The example is correct, but the description is swapped for byte 5 and 6.
  • Im not sure if its a documentation error or simply me doing something wrong, but for the TX (PC -> dongle) part, Ive never got byte 7-9, the race timer, to be sent by the PC and then accepted by the dongle. However, I can reset the dongle race timer by sending a race stopped state, so this isnt really an issue.
In the base 02 manual, theres any interesting section about the SCP-3 high power module:

Further, when the high power module is fitted, the original transmitter becomes a Bluetooth device, which can be paired to smart phones to save racing data and other information.
Is there additional data, not being a part of the dongle protocol, that can be extracted from the SCP-3 using this direct Bluetooth communication? If so, is it documented?

Now, I shouldnt get too off-topic myself, but it can be good to understand in which context Im trying use the Oxigen protocol. Its not at all about trying to do a realistic Formula 1 simulation with damage, weather or tires functionality. This is more about doing a gamification of this old hobby, with a lot of entertaining presentation capabilities. Its much more inspired by Formula E than Formula 1, and will use the nowadays more politically correct term charge level instead of fuel level. Slot cars have always been politically correct though, the motors have always been electric

Technically, its also very different from other RMSs. It builds upon whats outlined in this 6-year-old SlotForum post. Theres no PC required and no Windows program available. You instead bring-your-own Raspberry Pi, load it with some auto-updated software, connect your track sensors and/or your Oxigen dongle to it, and then all data is streamed to a server on the Internet. Data is then crunched on the Internet server, and then streamed back for presentation to any number of Raspberry Pis or any number of web browsers on any type of device and anywhere. Race management and configuration are done with a browser, or through a kiosk application on a Pi. This also allows for connecting other type of hardware, Philips Hue bulbs can be used as starting lights or individual driver status.

You can also use any number of extra Raspberry Pis and connect RGB LED matrices to them. Heres an example of a leader board using a 128x64 display:

razmanager_teaser_rgb_slotit.jpg


Heres your 20 drivers leader board, using 3 64x32 displays:

razmanager_teaser_rgb_20.jpg


Alright, Ill be back with a more detailed presentation in August, so lets stay on-topic, I.e. the Oxigen dongle protocol documentation.
 

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Premium Member
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166 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
These are RGB LED matrices, typically used for sport events, shopping centres, TV shows, concerts, etc, both for outdoor and indoor activities. You don't really see it from a distance, but these large video walls are made up of smaller segments. You can buy also buy one or a few of these segments, and use them for hobby purposes.

They are available in a wide variety of number of pixels (typically between 32x16 and 128x128 pixels), and in a large variety of pixel sizes (typically between 1.8mm and 10mm). You can chain them together, and there are also flexible versions available.

For professional use, you'll use a dedicated video processor to control the display. But for hobby purposes, you can use a Raspberry Pi to drive the display. There's a limit to how large display you can use with this setup, but for smaller slot car leader boards, it's OK.

I've bought the display used for the logo, status, and 6 race driver layout from AliExpress: Indoor LED Display Module P2.5 128*64 Pixel RBG 320x160mm

The status and 20 driver layout is made up of 3 chained displays, also from AliExpress: P3 indoor 64x32 RGB led module video wall 192x64mm

You'll need a Raspberry Pi 4 (a Raspberry Pi 3 will be sufficient for smaller displays and with less colors), and you'll need to get a RGB LED driver board, e.g. this one from AdaFruit (which also sells RGB LED matrices): Adafruit RGB Matrix Bonnet for Raspberry Pi

I'll explain all the details when my RMS is released, which I don't know when that will be, but hopefully before the Policar digital track pieces are available (anyone up for that challenge? 😊).
 

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ParrotGod
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9,270 Posts
WOW, that 20 car tower display is really nice.

Is it possible to have it running as an add on to other RMS like RCSO2?

In other words, RCS will be managing the race but the tower can be used to display the positions.
 

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Premium Member
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166 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The tower itself is standard hardware that anyone can buy and assemble themselves. In order for RCS02, or any other RMS, to get a similar display presenting the RMS data, an intermediate display controller needs to be programmed and connected to the RMS, a PC is not sufficient (and not used at all in my case) The display controller can be a Raspberry Pi, an Ardunio, a FPGA, or anything that someone can program and that has fast GPIO output pins (something that can control the 5V input lines of the display).

I dont think that any RMS today outputs the data needed by a third-party to do this without involving the RMS developer, but maybe its possible using the Scalextric ARC PRO Blutetooth protocol (that would then make a modern RichG tower possible, remember those?).

But certainly, RCS02 or any other RMS developer could make this happen! If anyone needs some help or hints, I'll be happy to share some ideas and insights, that's the purpose of this forum. Here are some starting points:

How the matrix works
Controlling RGB LED display with Raspberry Pi GPIO
Arduino UNO based HUB75 LED display driver
Driving a 64*64 RGB LED panel with a FPGA
Everything You Didn't Want to Know About RGB Matrix Panels
 

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Vendor
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2,974 Posts
Thank you for pointing out the errors in the protocol, I'll pass it on to Cristian, who is doing the development work on it.

About the SCP-3 main module working as BT, that's not been implemented yet, but it's something we're aiming at.

Very, very nice work.
 
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