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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have recently repainted a Monogram Mustang GT350R but the paint, when dried, is not as shiny as I'd like (or expected). I got some spray clear coat and applied it to a test piece of plastic with the same paint as the car but immediately the paint 'crinkled' up in spots. I'm certainly don't want to try this on the car. Any suggestions ?
 

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It sounds to me like an incompatibility between the coloured paint and the clear coat.

Some more information about the paints involved would probably be beneficial and help the painting experts diagnose the cause of your problem.
 

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the cold can cause the paint to bloom [go off almost matt in places] if you,ve got a nice orange peel free finish a very fine rubbing compound and a bit of ebowgrease will give it a shine you wont believe. sounds like youve used enamel or acryllic for the colour coat and used an automotive clear[cellulose]paint. you want an acryllic clear coat as it wont affect any paint thats underneath. john.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks guys. I'm not sure what type of paint and clear coat were used but I'll check when I get home later.
 
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I always warm the subject with a hairdryer and also the paint can in hot water. This prevents the "bloom" and helps the paint to flow better.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Saw this tip somewhere else: Clear floor polish (believe it or not !!). I tried it and ....it worked like a dream.
 

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QUOTE (fw14b @ 26 Jan 2012, 20:55) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>I always warm the subject with a hairdryer and also the paint can in hot water. This prevents the "bloom" and helps the paint to flow better.

I've warmed the paint in the past but not the body with a hairdryer . . . H'mm sounds good! . . . I'm going to try this on my next build!
 

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Hi Steve

The problem you have is almost certainly due to using 'Cellulose Paint' with another type.

Cellulose paint is normaly fine for most plastics, on it's own ( sometimes not that glossy, as you say ).
The finish with most Cellulose paints is intentionaly 'Satin'.

I'm guessing the clear-coat you sprayed over was almost certainly 'Acrylic'.

Although Cellulose is normaly fine for most plastics, on it's own...
...I never buy the stuff, as I may want to coat further paint or a matt/gloss varnish afterwards.

All the 'Enamels' & 'Acrylics' I've ever used, are compatible with one another, provided coats are VERY DRY between compounds.

Both 'Enamel' & 'Acrylics' usually give a higher 'gloss finish' than 'Cellulose' as well.
'Cellulose' is normaly intended to have several coats of 'Cellulose Laquer' applied over it before polishing.
The finish is deliberately NOT high-gloss, as the surface when dry has to provide some kind of 'Key' for the following laquer, which for weather exposed apllications, gloss doesn't do very well ( ie. 1:1 cars ).
Cellulose laquer is almost always 'Satin' also ( to give a 'Key' for following coats ), dries VERY HARD, and requires polishing/cutting, to a gloss finish.

Stick to Enamels & Acrylics for models.
I have used loads of brands & never had a compatibility problem, even between brands & types.

Hope that helps.

Cheers

Si.

Cellulose does give a much 'harder finish'.
So is always recomended for 1:1 cars, exposed to road-chippings, hedges & other agressive abrasives.
Enamel & acrylics are plenty hard enough for most model building though.
Boats & RC cars etc. are a possible exeption.

Also.

Cellulose CAN be useful in 'special-effects' painting.
Such as military-modelling and such like, where you might WANT a peeling-paint, rust showing through effect, or anything else which might exploit the incompatibility between paints to good use & effect.
 

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Hi steveaca

No probs. dude.

The simple answer for me is...
...I just use Humbrol enamels, 'cos thats what I started with as a kid !

Some people like the Humbrol acrylics as well.

Don't like Humbrol mini-sprays too much, never had much luck with them myself...
...so if I need a spray-can ( normaly primer ), I go for commonly available Acrylic sprays.

Cheers

Si.
 

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If it helps - this is my method - explained to me years ago by Swissracer!

Turn your oven on to 50 degrees - pop your body into the oven.

Warm the spray paint in hot water for two mins - then shake.

Spray the body and return to the oven to dry.

I use mixed rattle cans from Halfords and a matching laquer top coat (several).

Works for me and using the oven reduces drying times so you can get primer, three coats of paint and laquer all on in one day.

Some people have had issues with the laquer reacting with the decals, but i have had no problems (carfty paper waterslide decals printed on a lazer).


Two coats of laquer (two more will go on tonight, before a polish).

Just to point out this car was sprayed outside in the cold - the laquer went on with snow on the ground.
 

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I've just returned to airbrushing after a long time away from it.

Always used humbrol enamels as I was comfortable with and knew how to use them!
Have now converted to Vallejo Acrylics - the best thing? It takes about 45 seconds to change colours. I really am rubbish at painting, so it looks just as dreadful whichever medium I use, it's just that I get lots of satisfaction from working to my ability level.


I can't underestimate how much hassle that quick cahnge saves, plus it doesn't stick to everything you touch (I'm a bit of a messy beggar when I work!).

Not a bad finish at all there Jexy, considering the conditions. That roof decal was a very adventurous move and it's paid off handsomely.
 

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I do a very similar method to Jexy, not sure about the temp as some newer cars have thinner plastic for light weight ...
I have just bought an oven thermometer (a fiver delivered of the evilbay) for the very purpose of knowing exactly what the temp is and what is safe

Usually less than 5 mins in the oven prime, another 5 mins in oven then out and left to dry overnight. repeat for top colours, decal then laquer.

It helps a lot of ways I find, paint goes on and dries quicker while spraying, making less chance of runs, and the oven bake hardens the outside quicker meaning less chance of something settling in the wet paint.

I use an old cd spindle case base with the body blu-tacked onto the upright pole, and an old Carrera perspex box lid to cover over as soon as I finish spraying, the whole lot goes in the oven.

I usually only paint unpainted kits, so not sure about stripping old paint off, but I always wash the body in hot soapy water after rubbing all over with 1200 grit wet and dry, rinse in hot water and pat dry (not rub).

I use Halfords auto plastic primer, auto paint and clear gloss laquer.
 
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