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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We recently saw a mid-1970s open wheel club racer on the forum and, having had a productive time on e-bay recently with cartons full of tarnished brass chassis and crumbling dried sponge tyres, I thought I'd post these few pics of a short-lived phenomenon circa 1970.

I envy the dedication of the builder of this. Getting a 16D can fully in line with the rear axle and finding room for the wheels looks anything but easy. The axle tube is soldered into the can and one magnet. There's just room for the Cox spur gear that was kicking around in the box when it arrived; the spare 3/32" drill blank axle must have been for this set up too.

As you can see this is all very much as it got here with the track debris from 40 years ago still apparent. Now, where's the 'Ajax'...

Apart from it being a FT16D rather than the smaller C, I don't immediately recognise the can. Opinions please gents?

Richard
 

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Yeah,

This was a phase we went through !!.

I even, ( and others, I was not alone by any means ), did this on inline F1's to get the motor weight closer to the back axle.

This was even worse than a sidewinder, in that there was precious little can left to support the bearing once clearance was achieved for the contrate !!.

Interesting, and an indication of what we did to get every last smidgen of performance / handling advantage.

Nice to see the photos, takes me back. Other little details apparent, like the magnet shims, the spring post sleeves, the lead up front, the "plumber", etc etc.

Remember, nostalgia is not what it used to be. Sorry !!.

vbr Chris A.
 

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I was given a gear in the can F1 car sometime ago. I have given it a thrash round N.L. and it still works quite well on modern fish rubber. I will post some pics. of it when I get a chance. cheers steve
 

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Tony Condon
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Hi
These gear in can F1 cars were definately the way to go for a brief period of time ,
at the 1978 national finals I finished second to the great Ian jenson with an ian fisher (who invented this genre with Mike dockery ) lotus 79
I broke the race record and should have won
However by 1979 five out of the 6 cars in the final were gear in can cars
the only one that wasn,t was driven by me ,and finished last in the final .
so there was a sure fire performance advantage on tracks like the ECRA nationals track which favoured high polar momnent of inertia cars

Cheers tony
 

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Great stuff Richard; as you say, hard to imagine somebody going to all this trouble, but it is a very neat setup. Not sure if this was done in the States too, mainly because we didn't have the full-race 32nd cars you did in Britain

For what it's worth, here's a full sidewinder in 1/24, out of Britain too I believe, with a Cukras arm... Perhaps around the same period, and with the same sort of design philosphy, but a bit more space!

Don



 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Good looking car, Don. I have a well worn Cukras pink can motor with the flower power sticker still on it, in what looks like a Champion 1/24 plated steel a/w chassis. Needs some work though.

Tony: I think the one I started this thread with is more akin to that in the pic. on p.26 of your book. May become interesting when I try to source some rears.

Richard
 

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Ah, yes, thanks for the page number Richard - they look very close indeed. But in the book, Tony has this set in the early 70s - so was it that, or late 70s? What makes me think it's the former is that your car still has the lead wire (single) going through the hole on the jet flag (or predecessor), not soldered on a clip - when did the soldered guide clips come in anyway?

Don
 

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Pinion in can sidewinders were early 70s
These had died out before the pinion in can F1s came along in the late 70s
F1s had the can motor in-line, so were quite different to the sidewinders.
 

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Tony Condon
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Hi
The picture on page 26 is definately a Gear in can car and the fact that it has a mura B can denotes that it came from the early 70s
However they wern,t all that popular at that point in time as by then angle winders were well in vogue and gave the additional advantage that you could use smaller wheels and the angle of the motor kept the endbell out of the way of the offside rear wheel which meant you didn,t need to use a shortened motor or gear in can to make it all fit
The gear in can car as used in F! is on page 183 of my book
It is the ian fisher car that i described earlier in this thread and shows ,as chris suggested ,the amount of metal that needed to be removed to get the contrated into the can

cheers tony
 

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Gents,
Difficult to tell without clear measurements, but the can is not a Mura on that first car shown in the beginning of the thread, and certainly not a "B" can that never had this hole pattern in its many iterations. I believe that the can is a Tradeship and is of regular 16D-size. Below is a picture of such an animal in its original baggie.

Handwriting Font Material property Rectangle Transparency

As far as I can find in any and all documentation, the pioneer in placing the pinion inside the can was gene Wallingford, the imaginative club racer from Rockford, Illinois, as early as 1966 even before the angle-winder design devised by Roy Moody took over the slot car world by storm.
Below is a link to one of the 1967 Wallingford cars built with a home-made fiberglass body with built-in clear-resin windows, using a Champion motor with the pinion inside the can, that of course allowed for true 1/32 scale and wide-enough tires to get some grip.
And horror, as all the serious Midwest 1/32 scale period racing cars, it has a pin guide...




The full sidewinder shown by Don is typical of the pro-racing British chassis of 1971, after Ed Lewis had presented his version of such a chassis in American publications and had made a fool of himself racing one of the things in the UK. Why did the top Brits followed, for a while, this wrong way of building their cars when it was quite obvious that both Lewis and his cars were total losers is still a mystery today...


Regards,

Philippe
 

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Senior Slot Car Mechanic
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QUOTE Why did the top Brits followed, for a while, this wrong way of building their cars when it was quite obvious that both Lewis and his cars were total losers is still a mystery today...
I guess for the self same reason that the Swing/Drop arm hung around for so long and had such wide spread use and popularity, when it should have been stillborn at birth, and, never ever used on any slot car EVER.
 

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Tony Condon
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So Pillippe
Not a big fan of Ed lewis then !

Cheers tony
 

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Hi Tony,
No, not exactly. Actually not the only one, ask anyone who has worked at Champion under his tenure.
We have a French word for people like him, it is "fumiste".
I am sure that you can easily find the meaning of the word...


Ed Lewis had at one time, built another "revolutionary" slot car, that used the main chassis rails to have a moving weight working on acceleration, putting more weight on the rear wheels for traction, and more on the front of the car under deceleration. This car was hysterical to watch: as Ed braked at the end of a straight, the weight went BLAMM into the front and caused the car to violently de-slot, and the same happened under acceleration, the weight slamming into the rear of the car and causing the guide to lift off the slot.
Car Model (I believe) published a pic of the car in one of their report, failing to describe how the car worked, since they were a lot more diplomatic than I can ever be...
 
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