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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Sorry if this is a really elemental question, but, can someone explain the difference between 'Resin' & 'Plastic' for me? - Not the chemistry just as labels when referring to slot cars.

I'm just starting to discover slot cars as a hobby rather than just knowing of Scalextric as a toy - have joined a club and bought the cars for the various classes raced, but I also am interested in cars that mean something to me.

All the cars driven by my childhood rally heroes appear to be 'Resin' and pretty pricey. Is this just because 'Resin' adds more detail....?

Many thanks.
 

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Brian Ferguson
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"Plastic" bodies, as used on most modern RTR cars are injection molded and produced in runs of thousands. Detail has improved radically over the years but the demands of mass production usually mean that the molds lack super fine detail - though it may take a sharp eye to be critical of some newer stuff.

"Resin" bodies are typically produced in smaller quantities, often a few dozen or a few hundred. The molds and bodies are usually handcrafted. Detail can range from mediocre to unbelievable depending on the maker.

Plastic will always be cheaper because of the economies inherent in large production runs.

Resin is often the only way to get bodies that the major manufacturers won't do because they don't see a large enough potential market to justify the tooling.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Cheers Fergy.

Are there any considerations as far as resilience to 'offs' are concerned? - If I find a car that I want is only available as Resin, am I likely to find that it's more fragile than plastic?

I'm not one for buying cars just to stick on the shelf. Anything I buy is going to get used, so should I wait until until I learn my craft and keep a car in its slot before buying resin - or just get what what I like and can afford ignoring the Resin/Plastic label?
 

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Brian Ferguson
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Resin shells are generally more brittle than plastic and thus are more prone to accident damage. Thicker resin shells exhibit this less than thin ones.

As for whether you should or shouldn't, only you can make that decision. Why not buy one, build it up, and see how you make out? Perhaps a little fear of damaging your new creation will make you a better driver.
 

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Hi

In the 60s, fiberglas bodies were common. Simply, the resins of the time were unable to actually survive ANYTHING, they would shatter like glass. So, builders would put a layer of glas mat in the mold to help with strength.

I have fibreglas bodies that have been in use as slot cars since 63 that still Do the job.

One of my earliest cars(I don't remember precisely WHEN I did it), originally was a motor scavaged from a wrecked locomotive and put in a Merit Plastic 1/24 shelf body. That body shattered(old plastic also does that) sometime in the mid 60s. The car languished for a long time. Until a friend gave me a copy of a Merit Maseriti in fibreglas.

Modern resin bodies are a LOT tougher than the old ones. I have found them to be at least as survivable as converting a normal shelf model to a slot car. And a LOT MORE durable than any vac body I have used.

You do yourself a favor if you reinforce potential trouble areas. I simply use epoxy and cloth tape. Along seams, and with any part that might be vulnerable.

HOWEVER.... REMEMBER.....

"THEY ARE ALL DOOMED".

What do you want, a car you used and used up, or a car some archeologist digs up in a dump in 5000 years?

Fate
 

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Brian Ferguson
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QUOTE Glad you asked this question. I have been woundering about this myself, but I was just to shy to ask.

As my father used to say... the only dumb question is the one you don't ask.
One of the best things about this forum is that someone always has an answer and will share it.
 

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...comparison between resin and plastic is not easy - it always depends on the kind of material you use! The resin in use for the Volvo S60 I'm producing is very rigid, survives even heavy crashes - falling full speed from the tables of Suzuka down to the concrete floor does not harm them! Just details are falling off! If a body is intended to be used as a slotcar, there has to be no fear to use one out of resine.
FYI - the actual fully detailled and painted body of the Volvo including 3/4-interior, roll-cage a.s.o. is 22g - with a couple of layers of clear coat!
One of the advantages of resine against plastic kits is, that you might get a one-piece-body which is always the best solution for slotcars!
 
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