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redstar
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,here is an extremely rare set. Its a Horse Race Game by PMC of Hong Kong. The Jockeys actually go up and down at the same speed as the horses. They have a metal shaft that sticks up their but and moves them up and down as they run around the oval track.
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The set includes 5 awful plastic trees as well. Now let me say this the set was also made by Cragstan but the track,fence and controllers were different. You can see in my last photo the difference in the wheels. The spoked wheels are the Cragstan and the other is PMC. I have the Cragstan Jockey but no set. I know of 1 other Cragstan set that exists. You can find the friction version of the jockeys easily, usually mistakenly labeled OK Kader but the electric slot version -nowhere to be found.
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Administrator
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Thanks Bernard.

That's a pretty amazing set. Wonder what the relationship is between Cragstan and PMC?

Are those blue things on the controllers what you use to control the speed?

Don
 

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redstar
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Yes the blue knobs are turned to control the speed. The box cover,track,controllers,wheels of the horses,and fence are all totally different from the PMC . It is a real mystery about the Hong Kong companies. I wish we had a collector there that could research this question. We don't even know who made the 1st Hong Kong slot cars and what year they were made. OK Kader made the best quality slot cars but we don't even know everything they may have made.
 

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Premium Member
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Well, since I am well familiar with Cragstan because of my collecting tendencies with Japanese tinplate toy cars, let me interject here:

Now let me say this the set was also made by Cragstan
Cragstan (Craig Stanton & Associates) was not a toy maker and never made or manufactured anything. They were a toy distributor located in the Chrysler Building in NYC. Many Japanese and Chinese toys bear their trademark as well as often, the trademark of the actual toy makers.
Cragstan was purchasing toys wholesale at trade fairs such as the Chicago and New York toy fairs, where Japanese and Chinese toy makers came to display their wares and take orders. Most of the toys on display at these fairs were hand built prototypes, and were produced only if the orders were sufficient to warranty a return on investment. These toys, just like today's slot cars, were only produced once, as the tooling was recycled for the next project, and that included injection molds as well as stamping tools.
The Japanese were best at recycling especially in the postwar years.
Cragstan is known for applying their trademark onto toys made by Yonezawa, Alps, Marusan in Japan, and Lincoln in Hong Kong.

Toy prototypes are rare and often unique. In Japan, they were made of wood, then vacuum formed plastic with metal mechanical parts, their outer bodies finely hand painted. There are a few in my own accumulation, one being that of the "queen" of Japanese tinplate toy cars, the ATC Asahi 1961 Chrysler Imperial. It is made of wood with lost-wax cast bronze detailing. I also have a wood and metal prototype of a 1955 large motorcycle by the Japanese company "I.Y.". I put some picture of these toys below:

Tire Wheel Land vehicle Vehicle Car

Wheel Tire Land vehicle Vehicle Motorcycle

Another and directly relating to Cragstan is in ABS plastic and wooden arms, that of the 1965 "Mr. Atomic" robot by Yonezawa and bearing the Cragstan trasemark, with fabulous electro-mechanical action. That was found in the basement lock-up of the Cragstan company after it was dissolved in the 1980s, and that needed to be emptied. Two fellow collectors paid $20.00 to a doorman there to open the place for them, and there was a treasure trove of prototype toys, most by Yonezawa. Apparently, there was a dispute between the two about who would get what, and one of these folks took a gun and killed the other. A bit intense indeed! That guy ended in prison and apparently died there. Years after in the early 1990s, the toys surfaced in the then famous Glendale Antique Toy Show in California, and I purchased the robot there. It was not even expensive, and I always wanted a "real" Mr. Atomic, effectively the only "friendly" toy robot. Later, I was able to purchase a production model, that is still is in pieces in a shoe box, awaiting restoration. Some day... There were several replicas, "limited editions" made by two Japanese companies in the 2000s, one by MTH model trains, the other by the Osaka Toy Institute, still showing up on eBay time to time.

Headgear Font Helmet Poster Art

The production toy (left) and the prototype as found:

Toy Font Fashion accessory Window Carmine

Meanwhile I sympathetically restored the prototype and put a video of its action on Youtube.


The inner works were very rusty but I was able to save them with liquid rust remover and got the whole mess working again. The broken "feet" were made of cacuum formed styrene, and the Lancer bodies master, Lloyd Asbury, made a wooden pattern and formed a pair of new sneakers for me.


Now you know everything about Cragstan...
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I meant, "vacuum", not "cacuum"... Dell keyboard and old age.
 

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Gordon Steadman
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I suppose calling it Mr Atomic got round the problem of copyright over Robbie the Robot from Forbidden Planet!
 

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Gus,
no. There were/are plenty of Japanese robots inspired by the movie, produced shortly after the movie became such a hit. "Mr. Atomic" is from a decade later and made at a time when nuclear power was even considered in powering automobiles. Mr. Atomic is actually the only "non threatening" toy robot ever produced, likely explaining its popularity today. This one sold for $2250.00 in 2015:

https://www.liveauctioneers.com/item/42693408_scarce-japanese-tin-litho-battery-op-mr-atomic

A whole series of lithographed tinplate toy cars called "Atom" were released at the same time by Yonezawa/Cragstan, in 5 different sizes, the largest being 26" long.
 
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