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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
New poster here, coming back into the hobby after a 30+ year break (last set was a Scalextric 400 with 6 wheel March).

I'm embarking on a 3-board fold-away project to allow me to race Scalextric with son and daughter. Each board is 1600mm x 600mm, with 18mm ply framing.

I've gone ahead and bought the Scalextric Le Mans Ginetta G60 Digital set. Based on the track I have, and the space I have, have come up with the following layout on Ultimate Racer 3.0: The lines show the edges of the 1600mm board.

I've left a bit of space for kerbs and barriers and plan to 3D-print all these to suit.

h0d2aUC.jpg


I plan to cut the long straight pieces to give a pit lane on the outside of the hairpin. The running direction is anti-clockwise.

I've laid the pieces out on the boards and they seem to fit okay.

2CAA8y5l.jpg


I'd really appreciate thoughts and opinions on the following aspects of the layout:

1) How easy are Scalextric Sport track sections to pull apart when attached to a baseboard? Are they best modified to remove the tangs?

2) What is the best way to attach the track to the baseboard? I'm thinking silicone sealant or a hot glue gun at the moment.

3) Will this track work, can it be improved or is there anything obvious I've missed that won't work?

4) Will the small misalignment on the design software matter? It's about 10mm.

5) The track length is less than 10m, is it necessary or preferable to in extra power connections?

Also, I have a stock of old cars that need chipping. Is it necessary to fit the chips to the base of the car like the SSD-ready ones or can they be attached somewhere else?

Thanks for any help in advance!

Dave
 

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ParrotGod
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welcome to SF and back to the hobby.

First off: being this a digital layout you do not need the hairpin squeeze as you will plenty of interactions with traffic.

Make sure that you have at least a full straight before a lane changer otherwise it will not see the cars emitting the command to change lane or to go straight.

The pitlane in the real circuit that you have posted is too short: chances are that before you have time to brake your are out in the main straight again.

Make sure to add borders (inside and outside) so that the wheels of the cars do not fall off the track causing a deslot.

Scalex sport track is quite flexible so it is not a problem to bend a bit. To fix them on the boards I know some people have screwed the track piece directly on the boards making sure that the head of the screw is flat on the track surface. You can cut the small tabs in the tangs: the tangs will be used to help the track to align but without the tabs they will not lock with each other.

For non-dpr cars (the one that have the removable hatch at the bottom) there are several chips that can be used. You need to have a bit of skill with the soldering iron.

Depends how old these cars are they might not be worth it to digitalise.

have fun.
 

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1) How easy are Scalextric Sport track sections to pull apart when attached to a baseboard? Are they best modified to remove the tangs?

Difficult unless you have either cut the tabs as above or make the sections able to be lifted for the section where it is being joined so you can get your hands under each side to disconnect. Just have a play with the connectors.

2) What is the best way to attach the track to the baseboard? I'm thinking silicone sealant or a hot glue gun at the moment.

Silicon - hot glue lifts after a while/ does not let much expansion.

3) Will this track work, can it be improved or is there anything obvious I've missed that won't work?

With the baseboard you are going for there isn't much more you could do, I am a fan of the hairpin on small tracks. Try a range of cars if you can before sticking with the layout, you have some very tight sections.

4) Will the small misalignment on the design software matter? It's about 10mm.

You should be fine spread over the layout, the hairpin does not like misalignment as it tends to push the rails together on that section.

5) The track length is less than 10m, is it necessary or preferable to in extra power connections?

Nope. Will be fine.

In the meantime just try your older cars on the analogue mode (flick the switch on the side of the powerbase). Have fun.
 

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Hi and welcome

You say that you are going to race anti clockwise but your real track show the starting grid clockwise ?

regards ade.
 

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Hi Dave and welcome to the forum

When I first got the Arc Pro I was going to fit digital chips to all my cars but I found that it runs great in analoge mode and the youngsters don't appriciate digital anyway.

James
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for all the replies - some really useful info there.

My last post was a bit misleading (it was the only photo I had), but the track will run anti-clockwise with the pit lane on the outside of the squeeze-hairpin. I have read comments elsewhere that it isn't best practice to use squeeze sections on digital, but I quite the potential jeopardy of getting taken out by going side-to-side into it. It's bought and paid for, so I'll use it.

Interesting that you can screw track sections down - I think with the right-sized screws and inserts in the circular moulded parts on the underside of the track, that might well work.

I put the track on the framed boards, to check clearance for run-off areas and barriers.

ztACxOJl.jpg


I have acquired a few late-90s era cars - I can't see a reason why they can't be chipped. Is there something I've missed? I have experience in chipping model railway locomotives and it looks like a similar thing. All of my cars that have been stored have cracks in their wheels - I've managed to fix this by successfully designing and 3d-printing a new set. Not the same as the original wheels, but good enough for me with new slicks fitted.

XJEKcJtl.jpg


Good point on the analogue vs. digital. I have a fair amount of 'classic' track that I'll clean up and use with analogue control with the kids. Building a fancy digital track is to indulge my own interests really and I do like the look of some of the latest highly detailed cars from the likes of Slot.it, etc.
 

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I have acquired a few late-90s era cars - I can't see a reason why they can't be chipped. Is there something I've missed?

Good point on the analogue vs. digital. I have a fair amount of 'classic' track that I'll clean up and use with analogue control with the kids.
For me the main reason for not chipping every car is the sheer cost at £14 or £15 per car.

Analogue cars will run on digital track or Arc Pro when in analogue mode.

Digital cars will run in digital mode
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks - that makes sense.

I did a little more on my track today - routing out the gaps where the tracks pass between the boards. Not my finest ever wood work, but passable.

JYwXr9zl.jpg


Next step is to clamp the boards together and start marking out.

I also checked clearances to the end of the track. They only area of concern is on the outside of the hairpin, and it's pretty tight. Can't imagine that this will be a problem though, the vehicles should be travelling quite slowly at this part of the track. Unless of course the track arrangement promotes some serious Scandinavian-flick action.

BnBYw7dl.jpg


I also embarked on chipping my cars. A lot easier than I thought too, although I did need to dig through my electrical spares bos for some 2.8mm female spade connectors as the 90s ones were more than a little bit brittle. The 3-series was first up. After testing, all the wheels fell off, so I printed some new ones. Offset is a bit weird on the rear, but it looks ok otherwise and performs fine.

vl8cNc0l.jpg
 

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Circuit Owner
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Power taps are not necessary on such a short track BUT you do heed to ensure good connectivity.

If you have settled on your track then turn BBC each section over, tin the rails underneath and bridge each rail across the track join with a short length of wire soldered to the rails. This is the best way to avoid power issues as the track gets older and the joints have moved slightly through heat and usage.

The weak spots will be the board joins and you can address this in one of 2 ways:
1) occasionally pinch the box section rail ends so the bullet on the other rail makes a decent interference fit. This needs periodic re-pinching depending on his often you assemble and disassemble the track
2) bridge the gaps using soldered wires joined with some type of connector - at our club we use RCA phono connectors under the track boards.

Digital dislikes electrical noise and power drops, by bridging like this you will minimise power drop and minimise electrical noise from arcing.

Soldering each track piece together is a royal pain in the aXX but believe me it is worth it (voice of experience).
 

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Thanks, that's really useful advice. I plan to use the other side of the board as s model railway layout and will add dropper wires and connectors to the rails for those so it makes sense to allow for this for the slot car track too.

I placed the boards together last night and set up the track. What I found was;

1) It's virtually impossible to aligh the two sport track tabs simultaneously.

2) To give a satisfactory edge, the track needs to run right up to the edge and not overhang.

3) I need track lengths that are not available in the Scalextric catalogue.

This git me thinking as to whether I could use the same approach used for model railways, where the tracks are soldered securely and glued to the boards and the tracks bust-up against each other.

By cutting down and making good a couple of long straights, I wouldn't need much track and would get optimal spacing and satisfactory board separation with nothing overhanging.

Has this ever been achieved successfully to anyone's knowledge?
 

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Greg Gaub
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Yep. Lots of people have done portable/modular tracks using Sport track, and there are a variety of solutions to the problems you're noting. My attempt is linked in my signature below as my portable track. I also have links so some of the ones that inspired me in my first post. I can push my sections together quite easily, because I've used leveling tabs on the table itself, and the sport track is held to the table tops. As long as I go slowly and double-check the tabs as I go, sliding one table into the other only takes a few seconds.
 

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Circuit Owner
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Our club track uses loose half straights to bridge the gaps. The track fixed to the boards doesnt go right to the edge so you dont need to get it perfectly flush. Loose half straights are dropped in before the boards are fully pushed together.

Shorten the tabs so they are only 10mm long - it makes it easier to get them to engage.
 

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Hi what made you come up with 1600x600 boards ?

have they got to be that size to go into your car or something else ?

would love to know regards ade.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Hi Ade,

Yes, you're right, I did think about that, but I wanted double-sided boards and only 3 of them as I don't have the height under the bed.

You can get 4 off 1600x600mm sheets and 4 off 800x600mm sheets, meaning that if you join them, you get 6 sheets.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I screwed together all my boards together today so that I could cut the gaps for the track. A bit of adjustment required - it turns out that the design software that I used probably wasn't as dimensionally-correct as I thought.

IRnCHWTl.jpg


FNqCRtPl.jpg


hPDKhfIl.jpg


All fits though and is actually a fun little track. I found that the modern Ginetta G60s with their huge grip, low CoG and magnetic grip can set the fastest lap time, but the most fun was the chipped top-heavy Escort RS with its skinny slicks. It was a useful exercise running the Cosworth as it illustrated exactly where the kerbs and run offs need to be as it was very easy to roll the car with even the tiniest bit of over-zealous throttle. Fun though, and ultra-satisfying.

I made a breakthrough with the attachment of the track to the base too - NEODYMIUM MAGNETS!! By attaching these to the track underside and the baseboard, I'll have a more flexible layout that allows me to lift sections and replace as necessary. Thanks to MrFlippant and coming up with this idea on his page. Clever.
 

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Greg Gaub
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That's UshCha's idea. I just made his pics visible in the thread rather than links. It is a clever idea, which I'd forgotten about. It should work with pretty much any nail/neo-magnet combination, though I'd suggest nails with wide, flat heads, and magnets that are fairly wide as well. The magnets will want to center themselves on the nail head, but still stick if off to the side, and give when the track expands and contracts. I wouldn't suggest magnet to magnet, though, as that would be much too strong of a bond.

Keep doing what you're doing.
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