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mikeynzsc

2) What is the best way to attach the track to the baseboard? I'm thinking silicone sealant or a hot glue gun at the moment.

Silicon - hot glue lifts after a while/ does not let much expansion.
What brand of silicone glue do you recommend for sticking Scalextric track to MDF and is it strong enough to hold the track in place if the boards are stored on their sides (for storage)?

Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
What brand of silicone glue do you recommend for sticking Scalextric track to MDF and is it strong enough to hold the track in place if the boards are stored on their sides (for storage)?

Thanks
I'd say the Screwfix 'No-nonsence' own-brand clear sealant is up to the job. I expect it'd work better if you sealed / roughed up the MDF surface first.
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
I set about fitting a digital chip to one of my other Escort RS cars yesterday. I wanted to do this in the same way that Scalextric does it, so set about designing an adaptor that I could glue into place.

First, I set about creating a receptacle to glue in to the base of the car, which was fairly straightforward with the chip in front of me to measure. The challenge was fitting the chip in between the motor and the front wheel arches. In the end, I had to fit the chip with the IR emitter at the rear of the hatch as there isn't space to fit it the other way around. I then set about creating a cutting template and blank to check clearance. I use Fusion 360 design software, and this was a really easy operation when the receptacle was designed.

Gnfi784l.jpg


With these printed on my Prusa, I offered the cutting template up and clamped it in place.

KibVH9Ul.jpg


And set about cutting the hole. For this I used my cordless Dremel and sanding bit.

PSvTTThl.jpg


To keep it as OEM-looking as I could, I printed a new receptacle in black. To make it fit, I had to file the corners to get it properly into the hole that I cut in the Cossie's chassis.

rcmphPPl.jpg


I then glued the receptacle into place with suerglue and screwed the SSD chip into place with a countersunk M2 x 4mm pozi screw.

zz9boU4l.jpg


I was a bit overzealous with the Dremel around the front of the hole. I'll try to remember to fill this gap the next time I have some resin mixed up.

Next job was to wire up a JST 2.0mm 4-pin harness and the chassis is ready to roll.

9jOxH3Dl.jpg


On refitting the shell, the wiring harness fouled on the Cossie's interior, so I filed some away, shown here by the screwdriver.

ZyUiQGrl.jpg


I refit the shell, printed a new set of wheels, fitted tyres and give the car a run. After 20 odd years of not moving, the car went surprisingly well and was soon up to speed and drifting nicely. The bearings in the rear axle are shot though, probably due to hot / cold temperatures experienced during storage in the loft.

02Te5d1l.jpg
 

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ParrotGod
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Excellent surgery skills ;-)

However, be aware that the IR LED is quite far from the guide post which might result in missing lane changers (or even missing laps if the car slides under brake/acceleration over the power base). Mounting the IR LED on leads could help.
 

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Discussion Starter · #25 ·
Thanks and noted about the IR LED.

I've only just found the SSD chipping database thread - veritable goldmine of how to do it and it seems as though most people use the retrofit chip.

I like the idea of keeping the standard 8515 chip and its hatch without modification as it allows me to swap the chip out quickly and I am somewhat nervous about de-soldering the IR LED from the board and soldering on wires. Additionally, the rev. H chip has easier provision for lights, which I like the idea of for the future.

Here's a view of the underside of the Cossie, compared to the G60. The bulb is about 15mm further back relative to the guide pivot on the Escort compared to the G60 (sorry they're not aligned in the photo).

uZ8qCHQl.jpg


I've tried the Escort on my test track and it seems to work pretty much 100% of the time with a half straight before the sensor. I hadn't even considered it not picked up during acceleration / deceleration on the straight - I'll see if this turns out to be a problem.

As the Cosworth's chassis is so narrow around the front wheel arches, I couldn't work out how to fit the hatch without grinding pretty much the whole chassis material away, hence fitting the chip the wrong way round. Though my solution works, the only ideal solution would be to 3d-print a new chassis entirely.
 

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I've spent some time working out how to attach my Scalextric Sport track to my baseboard using magnets. At first I tried gluing the magnets to the bottom of the track, but it seems to be made of some sort of plastic that nothing will adhere to.

In the end I gave up and drilled through the track and used countersunk M3 screws to attach a carrier to the bottom of the track.

I also mounted a mild steel target plate to the baseboard to give the magnet something to grip on to.

This video shows you how I did it:


Link to 3d-printed parts: https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:4192229

Df3zRzwl.jpg


F7Px6NDl.jpg
 

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Great stuff this shows just how well 3D printing can be used to compliment another hobby.
Well done for the problem solving, hope you all look forward to using this track !

Simon
 

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Greg Gaub
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Clever. Have you considered printing circular magnet holders that press into those circular things on the bottom of every track? These are what Lex-Lox use to hold onto the buttons that are screwed to the track surface. I guess for that one, you'd need to sink the steel plates into the table surface, though.
ermm.gif
Come to think of it, 3D printing something like the Lex-Lox solution should work pretty well, too. See my portable track thread for how they work, if you have no idea what I'm talking about.
 

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Discussion Starter · #31 ·
Clever. Have you considered printing circular magnet holders that press into those circular things on the bottom of every track? These are what Lex-Lox use to hold onto the buttons that are screwed to the track surface. I guess for that one, you'd need to sink the steel plates into the table surface, though.
ermm.gif
Come to think of it, 3D printing something like the Lex-Lox solution should work pretty well, too. See my portable track thread for how they work, if you have no idea what I'm talking about.
Thanks - yes I did think about that but like you said, I didn't want to have to sink the steel plates into the table surface. That said, I might look at that again as the countersunk screws aren't as invisible as I thought they might be on the track surface.
 

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Clever. Have you considered printing circular magnet holders that press into those circular things on the bottom of every track? These are what Lex-Lox use to hold onto the buttons that are screwed to the track surface. I guess for that one, you'd need to sink the steel plates into the table surface, though.
ermm.gif
Come to think of it, 3D printing something like the Lex-Lox solution should work pretty well, too. See my portable track thread for how they work, if you have no idea what I'm talking about.
Mr Flippant, do we know what ever happened to the Lex Lok system and the bloke who made them, CaptKev I think it was.
 

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Greg Gaub
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Nope. I just sent him an email using the address on his Lex-Lox thread. I don't expect a response, but I haven't received a bounce message yet, so there's a little hope.
 

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Hey Ledeev and Mr Flippant,

What about printing a circular disk approximately 12 - 12.5mm in diameter (if this was tapered, this should be a reasonable friction fit to hold the track in place), about the depth of the circular receptacles on scalextric track with a hole in the centre.

These could then have a screw inserted prior to pushing into the receptacle, then pressed against the base board to locate for fitment(like the lex lok system) then remove screw and disk. then screw the disks in place, so on and so forth.

I had thought about doing something similar by cutting disks of plastic masonry anchors(wall plugs). I would give it a crack but don't have access to a 3d printer.

It's just a thought

Mark
 

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Discussion Starter · #35 ·
Hi Mark,

I think I follow, is what you're saying is to print a squat cylinder that aligns with the circular features in the bottom of the track?

Whilst good in theory it would require very accurate positioning of the cylinders on the table, probably way past the precision I can work to. The beauty of the magnets is that they allow a bit of inaccuracy with placement.
 

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Greg Gaub
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The wiggle room afforded by the magnet system is definitely a big plus.

As for the Lex-Lox design... Kev replied to my email. For a variety of reasons, it became financially infeasible for him to continue making and shipping the product around the world. As such, he is OK with the design being reverse engineered for 3D printing, as he doesn't have CAD files to share. As Mark suggested, it won't be hard to design the Lex-Lox components for 3D printing, which I'll do shortly. One of the things about the Lex-Lox system is the locating spike. Using a magnet to hold the steel spike in place under the track, the spike is then pressed into masking tape on your table surface to mark the hole. The Lex-Lox buttons all have a fair amount of play, as much as you can get without allowing the head of the screw through the hole. The screws are installed such that the button is still able to move laterally. When installed correctly, there is enough movement in the buttons to allow the track to be secured and move with temperature expansion/contraction.
 

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I bought a few sets of Lex Lox from Kevin when I first started. I thought I would have a permanent layout by know, but I dont, so I havent used them yet.

Here is a photo of the pieces including the tool, and the directions.

Font Material property Publication Paper Symmetry

Product Household hardware Fastener Gas Jewellery

Enjoy,

Shad
 

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Discussion Starter · #38 ·
Interesting stuff - it's a really clever design.

Following on from the discussion, I've created something similar, but using my steel plates.

The magnet is a push fit into circular feature in the bottom of the track and the 'puck' is bolted (from the bottom) into a 32mm hole drilled in the baseboard.

UCHtX9El.jpg
 
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