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Greg Gaub
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Regarding Lex-Lox, I have done the modeling and testing and finally landed on a good design, and uploaded them to Thingiverse for reproduction. Please take note of the need to test print the pieces because tolerance is VERY important for these, and every printer is a little different.

https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:4197921

For future discussion of Lex-Lox, so that we don't keep diverting this thread, please refer to this thread:

https://www.slotforum.com/forums/index.php?showtopic=73146
 

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What I did was set the magnets into the circular sections in the track but slightly under flush. Then the track magnet were large flat head nails (cut off most of the length) and glue so they are a bit proud of the board. That way the head of helps to locate the track and allows you to "feel" for the correct location. I did not have a 3D printer then but it would be ideal now to make the magnet fitting as you have accurate control of the depth and easy magnet fitting. I agree with Mr F that lex loc would be another alternative and it would be easy to print a locator bush with a tapped sharp center pin for the marker.
 

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Discussion Starter · #43 ·
A while ago I bought a pair of Scalextric 'LMP Team' cars to race with my kids. I wanted to add digital so that they could use my track and had planned to use the C8515 chip to achieve this.

When I opened the car up, I found there to be two chassis stiffeners, which meant that either I chopped the chassis about or I used slimline C8516 chip designed for F1 cars.

I designed and printed a mew receptacle, link to STLs here: https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:4249042

wD9FkiBl.jpg


This video shows how I did the conversion - straightforward if you have a 3d-printer.


Overall impressed with the performance of this £8 car (+£12 decoder and 50p harness).
 

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Nice how- to video! You do a great job explaining and hands on.

I just chipped 5 of those cars with C7005 and In Car Pro. I moved my led forward about 5.85mm to avoid missing track sensors.

I also added a rear tail/brake light, its not to scale, but it adds to the cars as they go around.

I may have to try a 3D printed one like yours. I need a Green LMP to finish my grid!

Car Wheel Tire Motor vehicle Vehicle

Auto part Bumper Font Automotive exterior Gadget

Tire Light Automotive design Car Automotive tire

Enjoy,

Shad
 

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Here is the light connection pin out for the C8516. I have not used a C8516 before, so I have not had the chance to try the wiring. It looks challenging...

Circuit component Green Passive circuit component Hardware programmer Electronic engineering

Most power from the chip for lights is 5v. You would need resistors for 3v LEDs.

Enjoy,

Shad
 

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Thanks Shad, that's really useful info. Not sure my soldering is up to wiring on to a surface-mouunted resistor.
I admit, its a bit tedious....no coffee for a day before, lol very steady hands, good eyes and maybe a magnifying glass helps too...

I'm sure its much easier to just wire to the braid connections, then you get the "lights on all the time" effect..

Be sure to check your voltages where ever you get power from and add the proper resistors to accommodate the LEDs you use.

Enjoy,

Shad
 

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I've been busy for the past few weeks building my double-sided table for my Scalextric, so thought it time for an update.

After building the frames for the plywood, I struggled to come up with a solution for the table legs. I tried many things, but in the end, I designed and 3d-printed a corner fitting that allows a leg (half a staircase spindle in this case) to be screwed into a fitting, which in turn is screwed into the corner of the table frame.

Here they are on my bench, ready to be fitted:

fnkA74Hl.jpg


And in place on the frame:

UDp9r1bl.jpg


All the corners complete:

IvopXisl.jpg


The STL files and the GCodes if you'd like to print your own can be found here: https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:4375387

After a small bit of lubrication, the fittings fit together really nicely and it's surprising how sturdy the table is with these printed parts.

With the plywood cover back on, and the track in place, the table looks like this:

UpnWo4Ul.jpg


With all the tables ready, I moved the whole project out of my shed and into the spare room, ready for racing:

JvsNFvPl.jpg


It's such good fun! I instantly got into the swing of it and have spent hours playing on it already. The wooden frame edges are a bit brutal and unforgiving when you touch them, next job is to come up with a solution for these.

I put together a video which shows more detail here:

 
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