SlotForum banner
1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
105 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all

I have started my switch from 7042 to oxigen and the consequence is that I no longer need the powerbase. So to simplify my track I am looking into replacing the 7042 with direct power to the rails. But as I am an ignorant in these matters I have gotten myself confused over what hardware would be best for replacement. I need enough power to run 5-6 cars and following the slot.it guide of 1A per car brings me to 6A. So now my questions:

Is there any value in taking in a variable power supply like the ones from DS?

Is there any sanity in connecting two variable power supplies to the rails to feed enough ampere?

What is the cheapest option or what do people generally do (is it an option to use some old laptop power supplies?)

Lastly - I have tried searching but given up, but I suspect these question are no way breaking new ground - so a link to a topic would also help alot.

Thanks
Jonas
 

·
Greg Gaub
Joined
·
15,389 Posts
If you're doing with a high end system like oXigen, I don't see much point to cheaping out on the PSU.
Get yourself a good variable voltage, high amperage PSU. You never know how many cars you might eventually be running on your track at once, especially if pace/ghost cars get more advanced.
There are many brands of "bench" power supplies that people use for slot car racing. The same kind that large analog tracks use would be perfect for oXigen.
Adding more PSUs would be risky, though. It's better to have one large PSU and a good amount of power taps for good power distribution.
 

·
Greg Gaub
Joined
·
15,389 Posts
I'm sorry, I'm not familiar with what's available over there. In the states, the de-facto standard is the Pyramid PS-26KX, which is a 20 amp regulated, 5-15v variable power supply.
I'm sure someone will chime in soon with a good regional recommendation. If not, there are threads in the SSD forum about Simple-H and what to power upgraded bases with that often have links to local suppliers.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,589 Posts
Hi Jonas
You are better off to choose a power supply designed to work on your local mains supply.

According to the ever reliable Wikipedia, the mains supply in Denmark is 230 volts 50 Hz. The UK and just about the whole of Europe work on this mains supply.
In the UK, the Rapid Electronics 25 amp 3-15 v power supply (order code 85-1824) http://www.rapidonline.com/Electrical-Powe...Display-85-1824 is widely used. They also do a 40 amp version (for a little extra money), which the guys running higher current motors use, but I think the 25 a version will be plenty for your use.
Units designed for the USA / Canadian market standard mains supply of 120 volts 60 Hz won't work on European mains (but usually can be made to work with an additional transformer.)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,646 Posts
you could buy a 230- 240v- 12v 30amp modern regulated switching power supply from china for under £30 delivered to any where in the world. they dont even spike in voltage when a car comes off. ive got this one and its good. i still have the 15v 5amp one i used for years, i only swapped cos i didn,t want to run my really hot motors at 15v. if you want variable voltage stick a dimmer switch in the circuit, ive used the same one for over 6 years with no trouble. under£3 delivered. if your interested pm me and i,ll dig out the ebay name for you
 

·
Gary Skipp
Joined
·
6,537 Posts
stoner gives some good advice, it's basically sound.

If you are racing with a dongle, there is no need to worry about dimmer switches and variable voltage. You can control the power (at least that goes to the car) via the RMS, which makes things very easy!

A word of warning - you may not want to get too greedy with amps. Because the track is live, if you have a short circuit for whatever reason then you may have an interesting time watching things weld themselves to the track rails! What I'm saying is, if you only want to run six cars then 15a or less may be 'safer' than 30a +... just in case..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
105 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks guys.

So from a "I dont want to fry my cars by accident" perspective I should keep the both the voltage and the ampere down. It sounds like a 12v / 15a would be sufficient.

Now I don't really understand if I need it with variable voltage. Does the voltage control the max performance of the cars? In that case I guess it could be used to finetune. But if I hit max performace at 12v anyway I guess its just as good to control performance in the rms system.

Stoner - it sounds promising expect a pm!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,589 Posts
You need a power supply to give enough current for all your needs.
If you really only need 15 amps, but it's cheaper to get a 25 or 30 amp supply that is no problem - simply buy the cheaper unit and put a fuse in the supply.
A 15 amp fuse would be fine in that example, you might find an even lower rating would do.
Any decent quality modern switching power supply will turn itself off almost instantly when a short circuit is applied. A 15 amp fuse on a 15 amp power supply won't do anything much, the power supply often shuts down faster than the fuse can blow.

With digital all the cars are in effect sharing the same lane, so the fuse has to be rated to supply all of them.
With analogue there is only one car per lane, so lower value fuses are used in the supply to each lane.

While a fuse is a wise precaution when the current required is well below the power supply rating, racers used to get away without. Thinking back to the days when most clubs ran a car battery capable of supplying 100 amps + and no over current protection at all, frying cars or things weld themselves to the track rails didn't happen. The only problem you did see occasionally was a controller wrongly wired up. They did heat up rather quickly, but as long as the driver had the sense to unplug it fairly promptly no damage was done. Maybe they were lucky!
 

·
Gary Skipp
Joined
·
6,537 Posts
[quote name='300SLR' date='3 Jun 2012, 09:18' post='714714'
While a fuse is a wise precaution when the current required is well below the power supply rating, racers used to get away without. Thinking back to the days when most clubs ran a car battery capable of supplying 100 amps + and no over current protection at all, frying cars or things weld themselves to the track rails didn't happen. The only problem you did see occasionally was a controller wrongly wired up. They did heat up rather quickly, but as long as the driver had the sense to unplug it fairly promptly no damage was done. Maybe they were lucky!
[/quote]

I'm speaking from experience! I watched both the guide holder of an NSR car turn to goo because it got pushed backwards and the braids came together, and a broken LED 'leg' weld itself across the rails during the oXigen 24 hours.

Comparing with 100 amps analogue circuits isn't applicable - think about the context. 100% live track with oXigen against track constantly having power modulated by the throttle with analogue. Unless you maybe wired your controller the wrong way, and then oh! We have your own example of this happening
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
105 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Btw. I bought a 20a, 13,8v cased power supply with build in fuse. Not the cheapest option but comparing with the standard scaley power supply i am happy (and get to fiddle with the scp01 controls to make it eun right). Thanks for your all your advise.

Jonas
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
495 Posts
QUOTE (300SLR @ 3 Jun 2012, 09:18) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>If you really only need 15 amps, but it's cheaper to get a 25 or 30 amp supply that is no problem - simply buy the cheaper unit and put a fuse in the supply.
A 15 amp fuse would be fine in that example, you might find an even lower rating would do.
Any decent quality modern switching power supply will turn itself off almost instantly when a short circuit is applied. A 15 amp fuse on a 15 amp power supply won't do anything much, the power supply often shuts down faster than the fuse can blow.

With digital all the cars are in effect sharing the same lane, so the fuse has to be rated to supply all of them.
With analogue there is only one car per lane, so lower value fuses are used in the supply to each lane.
Good points.
Even if 15 amps are theoretically required, if a lower rating fuse doesn't blow in normal use it will give more protection in fault conditions.

QUOTE (LMP @ 5 Jun 2012, 16:13) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>I watched both the guide holder of an NSR car turn to goo because it got pushed backwards and the braids came together, and a broken LED 'leg' weld itself across the rails during the oXigen 24 hours.
Do you know what the current rating of the power supply and/or fuse was when those problems happened?
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top