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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
It does not appear that anybody has solved the problem of the dead spot on the fixed pit lane exit flipper as yet (Not that I can find anyway).

This is just a suggestion as I have not tried it, also have never heard it suggested before. How about taking out the flipper and rebuilding the empty space with a set up like on the end of a XLC where the tracks rejoin (the area with the plastic not the flipper). I guess there are a number of people out there who have the skills to make this work.

I know it is not a perfect solution but it should make an improvement. Anybody have any thoughts? Is it possible?

Andy P

(hard hat positioned and ready to be shot down in flames!)
 

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You should read this link about powering the flippers... it discusses the CLC entry and exit flippers. The subsequent thread on the powered flippers for the XLC (link) improves on it. Although you would have to use both threads to get a solution for the CLC exit flipper using the 9v DPDT relay.

Cheers!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks fellow Canadian,

I have read through both of the threads but don't find a solution to the "Fixed Pit Lane Exit Flipper" although some sort of mix of methods may possibly work. My idea however does not involve any wiring or use of relays. Just take out the flipper - lengthen the rails and support with some plastic - similar to the XLC where the crossover rails rejoin the main rails. As I say in the first post it is not a perfect solution but should be an improvement on the existing flipper.

Comments please.

Andy P
 

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I'm a bit dense so bear with me... isn't the pit lane exit fixed in position? It does not "flip". So why is it called a "flipper" ? Am I missing something??
 

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Hi Andy,
Whether or not the exit flipper is fixed, or plastic I would guess, there is a power issue on leaving the LC.
The links I gave you are re: powering the flipper so there would be no "dead" spot as it is as designed. Stop on the flipper and you will not go again without a nudge.

Also, if you compare the XLC exit and the CLC exit you will notice that the XLC is very short by comparison, so little chance of stopping on it with no power... the rails are very close by. However, the CLC is very long and gradual since it is on a curve which increases the chance of stopping on it with no power. Hence, the powered "flipper" concept (whether the pinned or floppy variety). If you remove the metal flipper and insert a plastic "taper", shall we call it that, then there is a very long section without power guaranteed.

I hope that helps explain the discussion about the flippers. One more point, if the flipper is fixed, I think it removes the need to cover the tip so an to avoid shorts when the flipper touches either side of the slot, after all it is fixed!

Cheers from the west coast!


I just realized that I reiterated your initial concern about the lack of power on the exit flipper.... I answered your question with your question... duh! I really should answer emails in the morning when I am fresh rather than at night!

Anyway, I still think the size of the flipper replacement will leave a large dead spot that would not be metal so could not be powered... hence, the the powered flipper idea!
 

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Like the XLCs and the CLCs, you will need to take into account the width of the braids so that you do not get shorts occurring which can give a digital chip a "bad hair day".
 

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Paint or tape the fixed (metal!) exit flipper, so it does not conduct any electricity anymore.
Next tape with coppertape as you would when coppertaping a track. whereby the copper mates with a piece of it's respective rail. (If the coppertape has clear glue on the back, take an Xacto knife and make 1 or 2 scratches through the copper (only a few mm long is required) , by doing so you will make and restore electrical contact with the rail underneath where the two overlap.

Now you have a much smaller area where the car passing over it is not powered, taking into account the note that Greg put up in the previous post.
 

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Brilliant, Martin. Almost makes me want to pin my CLC flippers!

Good on you and thanks for sharing!

Cheers!
 

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QUOTE (aejp @ 28 Apr 2012, 00:56) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Cool idea! I wish I had thought of that. Don't think there is a better way of doing it than that - or is there?

Andy P

I have a way.
 

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hi
could be something to do with a certain youtube video.
 

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QUOTE (aejp @ 28 Apr 2012, 05:25) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Hi Martin, Have you actually done this mod before? If so can you post a picture please.

Andy P

Hi Andy,

Sorry but I have no pictures, as I don't have any fixed CLC exit flippers in my track. But if I had, this is how I would have done it to improve them...

Cheers,
Martin

PS. I guess the easiest way to insulate the flippers is to use overlapping strips of black electrical insulation tape, which even has the exact color of the track (duh!
)
 

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QUOTE (bigbird @ 28 Apr 2012, 10:07) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>hi
could be something to do with a certain youtube video.


No, this is something I was trying a month or two ago. Simple mod. Doesn't work with rev F chips. Rev G seem OK.

I experimented with taking 0V from the power supply and feeding it to the flipper, then the car sees a voltage and a signal, not as much as normal, but that worked well.

That was pretty impractical so I thought of another option. The signal either side of the rail is opposite. Feed both rails to the flipper by a diode each side gives addition so that the flipper sits at full voltage, the diodes stop interference from one rail to the other. The car then picks up full volts from one rail and the signal from the other, the effect is the same, reduced overall voltage to the car and half the signal.

It needs good conduction to that part of the circuit and some chips can't cope with the lower voltage or weaker signal.

Insulate just before the exit flipper so you don't get a short as the braid bridges the gap from the rail to the exit flipper. Solder a diode from each rail to the flipper. That's it!

I was working on a CLC exit flipper, but the pit lane exit is the same.

 

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QUOTE (RikoRocket @ 28 Apr 2012, 11:44) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Simple mod. Doesn't work with rev F chips. Rev G seem OK.

It needs good conduction to that part of the circuit and some chips can't cope with the lower voltage or weaker signal.

Insulate just before the exit flipper so you don't get a short as the braid bridges the gap from the rail to the exit flipper. Solder a diode from each rail to the flipper. That's it!

I was working on a CLC exit flipper, but the pit lane exit is the same.

Thanks Riko!

Very interesting!

What happens/doesn't happen with the chips that can't cope?
 

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Same as if it was isolated - they dont recognise signal so they can't drive off if they stop on one..

I ought to stress that it is vital that you insulate so that cars cannot bridge the flipper to any rail with a braid - the effect is a short circuit that will overload the powerbase.
 
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