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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi guys
I want to have ago at some repaints just a quick repaint of 6 sr cars.
So have done resprays on road cars and on furniture so not a complete dummy.
I know its all in the prep and would normally sand or wet and dry first and between coats.
But on a small model car this is not easy I guess so after washing in warm soapy water and drying
can you just spray on a plastic primer or is there a cemical to use first ?
Ps will be using spray cans on this project then see how things go if i get to buy an airbrush.
regards ade.
 

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Hi,

I use water and a 2000 sandpaper, also in between layers. After sanding stick the model under clear running water, and dry it with a hairdryer, of course be careful that it won't get to hot. Don't use any paper tissue or what ever to dry it, it only leaves dust particles on the model. The last color layer I polish with an normal car polish. Make sure all polish partials are washed of the model, you can use a dishwash soap like Dreft or what ever, and a very soft artist brush. Again stick the model under clear running water, and dry it with a hairdryer. Then apply decals and do some weathering if wanted and finish of with a clear coat. If you apply more than one clear coat than sand in between.

The place where you paint is also of importance. The temperature should be around 18°C or 64,4°F. Prevent dust flying around, I always through a bucket of water over the garage floor, it prevents dust swirling up and it sucks dust out of the air. After painting allow it to dry in a dust free space, a clean plastic box with a lid on would be perfect. And perhaps most important, allow the paint to dry, I always calculate at least 24H, the longer the better, time is your best friend.

If you're planing to do this a lot an airbrush will give you lots of pleasure. Only make sure when you buy one, that it's solvent resistant, even if you're thinking of working with acrylics. If you want some advice on airbrushes, feel free to contact me.

I hope this will help you a little further.

Cheers,
Danny
 

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I use a similar method to the above.

Fine sand the shell, plastic primer, fine wet sand, then top coats then sand then clear.

I hang a heat lamp above the model to speed up drying and keep the paint from clouding.
I also warm the cans up in hot water first which improves the spray pressure and shine.

Happy painting!
 

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Hi ive used wet and dry on panels and on standard cars to prep for painting
but how do you rub down a small model your only going to do the roof and sides on a saloon car
but if you were doing an F1 car you cant get to all the surfaces
that why I thought you must use a liquid solvent of some sort to attack the body for a key no!
regards ade.
 

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I find that using a chemical to remove paint usually leaves a glossy finish. For example I am respraying some Scalextric Super Resistant Porsche 997's and the easiest way to remove the tampo and paint is to soak in meths and then finish off with a meths soaked rag. BUT the end result is a VERY shiny white shell.

Keying the shell with wet and dry inevitably means you miss the hard-to-reach bits so I use a different approach.

I buy Astonish Oven and Cookware cleaner (try Home Bargains or Wilkinsons if you have them nearby). It's about £1 for a 500g tub which will do at least 20-30 cars. It's a mild abrasive paste with vegetable soap. Apply with a toothbrush and a tiny amount of water. Work the cleaner into the bodywork with a fairly stiff toothbrush with gentle pressure and the body is beautifully keyed even in the hard-to-reach places like panel joins and under fixed spoilers etc. Rinse under the hot tap and dry with a dry microfibre cloth and your body is perfectly keyed to accept paint.

You can also use this to key between coats of paint BUT make sure the paint is well cured or the physical action of the brush will rip up the paint.

I use Astonish because I can use it with bare hands and it's no problem. Don't try is with these super aggressive oven cleaners like Mr Muscle because it may take your skin off and/or asphyxiate you!!!

Hope that helps.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Hi Mr M
thanks that sounds a great idea havent got any of those shops but will look around for it.
what about ISOPROPANOL?
thanks again ade.
 

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Different manufacturers' paint reacts to different chemicals. It's trial and error I'm afraid.

Meths works well on modern Scalextric but won't touch SCX. Isopropanol may work on some cars but still won't work on SCX.

I tried a whole range of hydrocarbon distillations on SCX and nothing would shift the coating on my SCX NASCAR. I ended up using wet and dry and the Astonish to finish it off.

Astonish oven and cookware cleaner will actually take any tampo and paint off any slot car but requires HOURS of gentle scrubbing with the stubborn ones. Chemicals simply help speed up the process by removing most of the paint leaving the final fiddly bits for the toothbrush.

As you don't have a Home Bargains or Wilkinson, try the following link - it should help you find a stockist locally.

Astonish website - where to find stockists
 

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Isopropyl 91% alcohol works fine on SCX NASCARS. (if you're based in the US, you can buy it real cheap at Walgreens...)
It takes about 24-48hrs of submersion (I use a clear slotcar case for it) and then the whole paint layer curls off, without damaging the plastic.
 

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Perfect timing! I was just getting ready to make a post. I do have a question: Can someone recommend what type of paint to use? Thanks for your input.

rob
 

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I've never used it myself but I've seen very good results after using Fairy Powerspray to remove paint. As far as rubbing down between coats goes then normal wet and dry won't be able to conform to the small contours on a model car. Fabric backed Micromesh is what you need - works the same as W&D but goes down to very fine grades - here's an ebay link to some - link
I don't think the type of paint matter as much as your careful prep, application and finish - Halfords/Humbrol/Tamiya rattle cans all produce great results. Here's a link to an excellent article on spray painting - link

roger
 
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