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DT
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What can members advise regarding the steps to preparing a car for storage or show?

Anything special done to tyres? Do you oil at all? Protection of delicate parts?

What can happen to cars stored for long periods?
 

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In my own collection I am starting to see more and more Fly classic cars with `rigid` tyres. They appear to be leaking and go runny? Not nice. The cars have never been out of the box are kept out of direct sun light and in a dry ventilated room. What`s that all about?
 

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I was rather dismayed to rummage through some cars the other day; only to find that the same had appeared to affect the Scalextric F1 cars (1988-1996). The type fitted with the sticky Good Year Eagle tyres (Yellow sidewall writing).

Also to prevent browning typically found on old White cars (can affect others)carefully remove the tyres before storing, typically the browning or yellowing effect begins around the wheel wells.

Jamie
 

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Jamie Coles
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It would appear to be Chemistry here chaps - he says donning the ol' mortar board and acid-holed gown from grammar school. (yes young Turley ye may mock but I are a creature of that background!!)

I would suggest that the same chemical that is leeched from the tyres that makes them go gooey ( a techie term I promise you!!) also effects the pigment within the plastic.

Bearing in mind both tyre and plastic are both petro-chemical compounds, and are thus organic derivatives of carbon, then a locfal reaction is bound to take place.

If one is going to store such items away for a period of time I would suggest that the cars are dis-assembled as much as possible and the plastic parts are separated from engine and metal.

As air (oxygen) causes oxegination of most things, and plastic in any moist atmospheric conditions is acidic and succombs to oxegination - which can cause disclouration.

.....and tonight's homework is to learn the first 20 elements of the periodic table !!!!

j-c - off to common room - sorry chaps a Farnham thing!! -but I think the above is true
 

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Heres my H/W Prof!!

Li Be B C N O F Ne Na Mg Al Si P S Cl Ar K Ca Sc Ti

(A-Level Chemistry was not fun!)

I always wondered what makes white models suffer so badly from browning. I had a Lister with the same markings on it, but it was more where the bulbs were held in place inside with small bits of rubber
 

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Aside from the degradation already mentioned one problem I can forsee would be the tyres developing flat spots - especially if the car is screwed down on it's base. If they're cars that you think you might want to keep on display (i.e. with the tyres on!) but also would want to run in the future then I'd suggest buying spare sets of tyres and keeping them seperately....

Paul
 

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Scott Brownlee
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But if you bought the tyres at the same time as the car, would they not decay as well?

I'm just grateful to whoever is Ortman for their great range of replacement tyres - long many they continue.
 

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Scott - I made the point about buying spare tyres in case you did get flat spots on the ones on the model from long term storage.

I think the point about tyres decaying is due to the fact that they're mounted on the wheels and there's some reaction between the hub material and the tyre compound.....

Paul
 

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J-C

Your point about completely stripping a car down is spot on, totally agree as to the safest course of action to prevent discolouration.

However I didn't mention completely stripping cars because maybe in 10 years time when readers begin to resemble cars due to advice sought on this forum...

... they discover that they have lost the wheels for a prized Bugatti...

... then come looking for those responsible...


Scott's tip for Ortman tyres is a good one, however authenticity goes out the window because the cars tend to run better with Ortmann Uber tyres than original Super Slix! (cool name)


James
 

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QUOTE (Revvvs @ 19 Oct 2004, 14:05)Scott - I made the point about buying spare tyres in case you did get flat spots on the ones on the model from long term storage.

I think the point about tyres decaying is due to the fact that they're mounted on the wheels and there's some reaction between the hub material and the tyre compound.....

Paul
<{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I have a lot of Hornby Escort Cossies, kept in the dark, some have 'white' white wheels, while others have 'brown' white wheels, cars are from same era (mid/late nineties). any solutions (chemical? or otherwise) to get them back to being white?

Maybe I should never have opened the boxes and let out the 'Factory Air' that they were produced in, or better yet kept in a hermetically sealed nitrogen atmosphere , at a constant 4degrees and constant humidity - in the dark of course - why, they would reach - say, thousands on Ebay now...................

I beleive cryogenics for Scalextric could make me my first million.

In reply to the first query that actually started this topic, if you do ever decide to 'show' them do not let snotty nosed kids touch'em, drop'em, turne'm into aircraft on a test track etc.

They are not toys you know..........
 

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Anthony Bartlett
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ok - but back to one of the original questions - is there any 'liquid' that can be added to tyres to keep them supple.

I have found that in the period of about 5 weeks where we did no racing over Christmas, several of my cars rubber (tyres
) have hardened to the point where I have had to replace them for this years racing.....

It would be nice to be able to periodically clean the tyres with 'somthing' to keep them supple.....

What about a light wiping with ATF fluid used for 1:1 cars ?

input apprecaited.....
 

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Ewan McKen
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The 'Slot Guru' Mr Matt Tucker says in this weeks Tuckers Tip 3in1 Oil is the fluid you are looking for.

He also suggests store your car with the tyres not touching anything.
He says this helps with general tyre degradation as well as specifically preventing flat spots.

I am interested to know why you suggested ATF.
In the late seventies I worked as a petrol pump attendant in a garage.
I remember the Mechanics stories of certain brands of ATF eating the seals on certain brands of car.
So not the first thing I would have thought of to rub on my tyres.
But I guess when you think about it eating seals and softening tyres could be the same thing.

Regards,
Ewan.
 

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a little trick i employ to keep tyres from developing flat spots is two fold a small bit of cardboard about 2 cm wide x 4 cm long in half...loosen the retaining screw under the car in the box and slide the folded cardboard under the rear of the car and another piece just behind the guide..which lifts all four wheels off the base...then re-tighten the retaining screw so all 4 wheels are about 1mm above the base without compressing the cardboard too much and voila...no more flat spots...and the car car is still held reasonable securely to the base
i do this all my shelf queens before storage..as replacement tyres for so many cars is an expensive options..assumin gyou can find them a few years from now
 
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