SlotForum banner

1 - 20 of 39 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,509 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
OK gang, well with the recent release of Pendle's PCS32 chassis I thought it was about to time to take a deep breath and jump in and go scratchbuilding!

I've never scratchbuilt any slot car before apart from hacking up a Revell Audi DTM to fit on top of a TSRF chassis (it fell off...) so I'm starting from, well from scratch actually...

Back in the days when I owned two TR7's I used to get the Triumph club mags. THere's a fairly healthy racing scene amongst Triumph owners and I also liked the cars that had been cut-down and seriously lightened for amateur racing. This sort of thing is what I mean.

http://www.cptc.org/images/OurCars/Kelby&#...TR4%2009-03.jpg

(I'm afraid the URL has %20 on it for spaces so might not work on Macs - try cut and pasting the URL and replacing each %20 with a single space). When I looked on Hannants website to see what 1:32 kits were available I realised that this would be the sort of thing I wanted to do.

So let's to it!

First problem I found was that Hannants have a minimum order amount and 1 TR4 kit comes in under it. After a bit grumbling I ordered a second reasoning that it would do for spares as I wasn't really sure what I doing with scratchbuilding. As it turned out this was something of a blessing in disguise as the first kit I opened turned out to have a body so badly warped as to be useless. I've straightened out 1:72 aircraft wings before but this looked to be beyond repair. Kit #2 was quickly opened and turned out to also be bad but perhaps more salvageable.

Fortunately these days I most adopt a Seneca-approach to life which is basically to assume that everything will go disasterously wrong, you knew it would in the first place, so lets not bother getting stressed about it.




Here's the assembled body (I will be scratchbuilding a roll cage when I think of what material to use). One of the door panels is warped outwards from the body but I assume that when mounted to the chassis and left there sort of for ever it will be forced to straighten out. Much worse was the section of the body between the bonnet and the dashboard which is badly sagging. Hopefully I've resolved that as can be seen below.



My solution was (once the bonnet was attached) to superglue a length of lollipop stick (left over from an abortive popsicle stick chassis) under the bonnet extending under the errant piece of the moulding and pushing it upwards. Plastic Padding Liquid Metal (expensive, but the best epoxy glue I have ever used) was then used to attach to more securely than the superglue would allow for. Later on in the project I will have to do something to block that airgap between bonnet and bodywork.



Here's the PCS32 alongside the body. The wheelbase is far shorter than the chassis will allow for in it's default guise but that was just a simple matter of shortening the guide 'slidey bit' with a Dremell. Of course the cutting disc then broke mid dremmeling and of course I had neglected to put the goggles on. I notice that the two times I have not bothered with the goggles I have suffered from a cutting disc fracture. Is some deitic figure attempting to tell me something? (I really hate powertools they scare the s*** out of me...)

The motor and bushings come from a donor Scalextric Jordan (old skool style with the brown traction magnet). Rear axle and crown are from a Fly Capri, but this may change as the mesh seems bad when turned by hand so I may just use the Jordan axle and crown instead. I forgot to pop the Ninco sprung guide in before taking the photo so just use your imagination. Front axle is from a Revell DTM Audi static kit. Obviously neither axle has been cut down for the correct track yet.



Here are the proposed wheels. Two sets of Scalextric Mustang fronts (the rears are wider and taller). These are unpainted because they came from two Mustang kits (I used to race the Mustang at club level and so have several static kits in order to use the bodyshells as disposable and customizable). They look to be a modern improvement upon the original wire wheels without looking up to the minute 2004-vintage.

You might be wondering about the driver in the first photo. Well when the glue on the TR4 was drying I starting messing about with a TeamSlot Renault Dauphine rallycar kit that I have and he's the driver from it.

My original plan was to use a bit of black card with the Scaley Jordan driver arms and shoulders and an open face head that ABSlotSport supplied me with. However I was under the impression that the TR4 is a pure two seater but actually with a rear bench seat it's really a 2+2. This means that the cockpit area is quite large and the black card approach wouldn't work.

While painting the Renault driver I realised that he is ideal for the TR4 but this in itself raises two problems. Firstly this would mean that I have no interior or driver for the Renault and secondly the large cockpit area of the TR4 would still be an undetailed eyesore.

I was in a bit of a bind over this but ultimately a couple of factors won out and Renault-boy will now be driving a Triumph. I decided that since I the TR4 is open it deserved a nice driver figure whereas the closed Renault could get away from something 'lesser'. Also I'm working on the TR4 and not really on the Dauphine so this car gets higher priority.

The plan now is to remove the driver and still black card mount him but scratchbuild up a tonneau cover to cover the rest of the cockpit.

Next stage is, I think, to cut down the axles and test mount the body. I'll be using the balsa wood method for body mounts.

More in the coming week hopefully - I've borrowed a digital camera from some friends so I suppose that is setting the pace and encouraging me to hurry up

Coop
 

·
Alan Tadd
Joined
·
4,030 Posts
Well Done Coop

Great start. For the Rollbar how about some brass rod. Easy to bend and cut.

Regards

Alan
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,509 Posts
QUOTE (BEEJAY7 @ 7 Nov 2004, 21:36)For the Rollbar how about some brass rod. Easy to bend and cut.

I'd thought about plastic rod then covering it all in a thin wraps of Duct tape, wound round and round to represent 1:1 Duct tape being rolled around foam padding. Brass rod would have the advantage of keeping a curve but I'm assuming that I need a vice, then some grips then something to bend around as a former?

Either way I probably won't be able to get either plastic or brass rod before next w/e so that gives me some time to think about it some.

Meanwhile, here's another piccy of the sort of thing that's inspired me



Coop
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,070 Posts
Nice going Coop and some useful advice there about what not to do when using power tools


I find the plastic coated wire often used to secure kids toys to the packaging (you know the stuff that makes your fingers bleed on Christmas morning) is great for roll cages. Easy to bend yet still fairly strong - especially if you paint on a little superglue to set it.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,509 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
jhardy33 - I hadn't intended directly modelling it after each of the real examples but that white and green does look nice... I have the number disc decals from one of the Mustang kits that might get used, as I recall these can be a little translucent on dark backgrounds so the plan was to go with a nice light colour anyway. Maybe white now. Hmmm....

beejay7 - Thanks for that I might take you up on that offer, but I think it's best that I have a go first - and then come running to you when I can't get it to work!
.

Coop
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
54 Posts
found some nice triumph kits here..
http://www.traffic-modelcars.com/h32-bmc32.htm
when my budget allows i think i'll try to re-create the triumph stag my late uncle used to own...i think he dropped the engine from a rover 3500 in it as he said triumph engines weren't very robust...oh man memories of the overdrive on second gear on some dusty back roads still make me grin today..

the thing used to gurgle just standing still..something to do with 'the webers need 're-adjusting'...almost a weekly ritual if memory serves me right..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,509 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Right it's twenty past seven, I'm back from work and had a nosebag of Shepherd's Pie Sandwiches and a can of Banks Mild (normally I do eat much better than this but had a hellish drive back due to roadworks and felt in the need of some comfort eating). Back to the workshop!



Here's the chassis wired up and running with a spare Scalextric NASCAR inline axle. I did discover this evening that when they say Ninco bullet connectors, they mean Ninco bullets, not ones you've cannibalised from a ProSlot 911 nor ones from a TeamSlot Dauphine. These wouldn't fit the Ninco guide. Fortunately I turned up a Ninco McLaren that I'd forgotten I had that has never raced due to a broken crown so ripped them off that instead. Note that since the wiring was already attached to the Scalextric motor this has so far been a no-solder operation. All I had to do with strip about 15mm of wire sheathing from each wire, push through the bullet connector and fold around at the other end. The core of the Scalex wire is quite a bit thinner than the core of the core of the Ninco wire so these might need replacing at some stage. But OK for this stage.

Slapped the car with the NASCAR axle on a little oval of Artin 1:43 track and lo and behold! It actually works so long as I keep some pressure over the guide. I've abandoned the Fly axle, the crown never seemed to want to mesh against the pinion but this mesh is seriously smooth as is.

Right then, back to work now...

Coop
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,509 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
OK, now we've hit a problem... It looks like against popular belief the kit wheels are not the same as the slotcar wheels. The inner holes are just too narrow to take a standard 3/32" axle. This doesn't seem to be by accident, as the NASCAR wheels are a loose fit on the kit chassis but the kit wheels are a nice, snug fit. Looks like I'll now have to do the fiddly task of carefully boring the wheels out without doing it too much and upsetting the 'sit' of the wheel on the axle.

What joy...

Coop
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,509 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Very true Alan.

Anyway I seem to have hit upon a brute force solution to the problem. Heat up the end of the axle in a candle flame (while holding said axle in a pair of mole grips) and then push in when warm.

However before I do the other three I need to work out what width to cut the axles down to. Of course if I cut to the body width then the wheels will still be outside the body... So I need to cut slightly smaller but exactly how small? Ah, now theres the trick... No doubt this will come to me while doing something else, like at about two minutes past nine tomorrow morning!

Meanwhile though I can get on with mounting her body (steady at the back there!)



The traditional two strips of balsa wood that I found floating around my study cum workshop. Just superglued at the mo so I can always reconsider, once 100% happy they will be smeared in epoxy as a permanent fixture. To get this height, I measured the chassis standing on some stand-in Metro wheels - a little small but only about 1mm in radius out from what I will be using. The top of the chassis 'sidepods' were 11.5 mm off the deck, the body looked good at about 2.5mm ergo, draw two lines inside the body at 9mm from the sill with a thin marker pen and that's where the balsa is to go.



3/4 view of the mounted body with too-wide axles and Metro wheels (looks quite big on 1:43 track....)





Two more views. At the moment she is a bit 'nose up' but that's the effect of the sprung guide with no weight over it and a bit of lead will soon cure that.

Right that's yer lot for this evening, I've got housework to do before bed


Coop
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,509 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Still not solved the problem of how to measure the axles so here's some paint instead (posed on, for absolutely no reason whatsoever, a book that proves just what a geek I am)





Even the paint is retro, good old brushpainted Humbrol Enamel. I would have sprayed but recently anytime I've been so much as near a spraycan I've come out in hacking cough (good old Scotland banning smoking in pubs today! I may move north of the border...
)

Something I noticed today is that even though the two 4's I am using as inspiration don't have the original screen they do have a little strip of plexiglass to divert the wind away from the cockpit so I will now be thinking about how to model that - probably with an offcut from one of my lexan BSCRA blobs.

Also this arrived today - so ugly I just had to had it and 1:32 as well!



Coop
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
316 Posts
QUOTE (Coopdevil @ 10 Nov 2004, 22:13)Also this arrived today - so ugly I just had to had it and 1:32 as well!



Coop
<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Ahhh Coop.....

When you get to doing the dragster, which looks awesome by the way.... I curently have a project sitting on the back burner, of a 1/32nd Top fuel dragster...
(When Ive moved home, hopefully by the end of next week, and Ive dug it out of the box its stored in, I will get it out and post picks of where I am... Currently body shell painted.... just about to start on the brass tube chassis...)
Im looking at getting a set of dragster wheels, but the only place I can sem to lay my hands on them, is from a place in the states. I noticed your Uk based..Have you though about getting wheels and tyres yet?

CoolS
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,509 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Truth be told I hadn't given it much thought past seeing it for sale and ordering it. I have two old Parma Womp-Womps at home which have chunky tyres (which are a bit past it and will need responging) so I might start with the rear end of a Womp and see what happens past that point. I'm fairly keen to have the body hingeable at the rear and add the kit engine to the chassis - seems obligatory for a funny car that you can open it up and look inside.

The fronts look like they might be re-usable since I don't want them rolling, just there to make a tripod look a bit better. If I remember I'll post a piccy of the Womp tyres but as can be seen the macro on this borrowed digital camera isn't up to much and they might not come through very well. Chas at SCD should be able to supply Womp parts.

I started restoring an old Trinity 1:24 chassis and S16D last night with an eye to re-bodying it with a modern repro of a old Classic Thingy (as in the Thingy thread on the Scratch board) so the Funny Car is below that on the list of things to do.

I found the website of the designer of the Funny Car kit, a guy named Tom Daniel who apparently did about a dozen in this range all of which were designed for the same chassis. So that raises the whole issue of making the body easily removable to add bodies from the other kits.

Coop
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,509 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
OK, a bit of paint detail, five coats of Future and it's starting to dawn upon me that it's a long long time since I built a model kit and my kit modelling skills ain't what I thought they were. It's all very well being quite handy at wargames tanks but of course bad bits on them can be handily disguised with dirt, rust or a great big bit of camoflague foilage. And some how I don't think this will work here. Never mind we all have to start somewhere, even if I am wishing I started somewhere else with something a bit bigger.



Decals are mostly from the Hornby Mustang with a few extra bits from the bits box.



Even the Ghost of Steve looks unimpressed... ...about as unimpressed as when the framing shop lost him for a week!



Somebody was asking about the size of the TR4 (actually I think it was my Dad) so here it is next to a couple of modern land levianthans. See how much I need to cut the axles down?

Coop
 
1 - 20 of 39 Posts
Top