SlotForum banner
1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Gary Skipp
Joined
·
6,476 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I don't really know what proxy racing is, but here is what I think goes on:

Racing:
A team is formed, usually a manager and then one racer per location.

The manager builds a car using the rules set out.

The car is sent from person to person for each round and occasionally back to the manager for modifications.

Is this correct?

Cars:
They all seems to have metallic chassis - please explain


"No additional magnets except for the motor magnet" = No magnets, yeah?

How do you get a kit body (IE not a slotcar body) to fit the chassis?
(this ones just my curiosity)

Thanks for th help, not sure wether this should have been in 'master classes' but oh well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,889 Posts
Not really a manager, more of the car owner. There is no team as such, the car just gets driven at the various locations by all the drivers (usually with the exception of yourself). The chassis is usually metal, but definitely non-magnet. We run sponge tyres on the rear.
Chassis can be bought in, which comes in handy for those without the skills, or more importantly, tools & facilities for chassis construction.

How do you get a non slotcar body to fit? Just adapt it!
Seriously, decide on whether you want to use some home made mounting posts, or do as I did and have the body attached by pins pushed through it on either side into tubing on the chassis. You probably won't have seen my car yet (Revell EasyKit AMG Merc body) as it was deemed to be too low at the front. Also, initially the rules said any Plafit motor could be used, but there turned out to be an exclusion on Plafit Cheetahs (all amicably argued and resolved
)

Mark.
 

·
Alan Tadd
Joined
·
4,030 Posts
You're right Gary.

As Diff said the chassis can be built out of anything stated in the rules

To see the Rules :- http://jbriggsk9.tripod.com/chrisbriggsslotcarpage/id13.html

The bodies can be From any source, some are commercial bodies, modified and repainted and some are resin shells like my Nissan and Graham's (Grah1) Ferarri

The beauty of this type of race is that the cars are completly different from each other, and yet they only end up 0.5 seconds apart after a qualifying session. (take at look at Chris Brigg's site which gives detailed photo's of the cars taking part).

Because the cars are running on deep slot wooden tracks there are some differences to "normal" slot cars. You have to use a deeper guide, and the rear tyres must be made from a foam type material, but all the materials you need are readily available.

My car uses mostly slot.it parts, plus a Parma Guide and rear tyres and wheels made for me by Chas Keeling at SCD.

It's my first year of proxy racing, and although I'm not gonna win anything it's just great to take part. The Guys in the competition are great and will give you all the help you need. After all in how many Competitions will the opposition show the inner workings of their entry BEFORE the event starts.

Regards

Alan

Regards

Alan
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
376 Posts
LMP

Mark has it right..... You are the builder and owner of the car...... You build the car for the rules that are set up several months in advance...

The reason for the metal chassis ( mostly brass) is that all the races are run on routed tracks.... A brass chassis is a much better handling chassis than the RTR chassis are..... But you can build the chassis out of a lot of different materials...We have PC board chassis in this years races.....

The cars are sent by the owners to the different hosting tracks, which as a rule are club tracks... And the club members drive your car.. And yes the owner earns the points.... This year we have 2 races here in the States.... Then the cars are going to Australia for a 4 race series there.. Then over to England for a 3 race series..
And this year we are going to try a race on a Carrera track in Switzerland to see if they will run on the plastic tracks...... At the end the points are added up and a winner is announced....

As for the bodies the chassis are made to fit the body we pick to build..... You can build a chassis for most any body.... you can use model car kits for bodies, RTR bodies (these can be hard to find but if you look they are out there) You can find bodies on Ebay... Monogram is going to be coming out with their bodies as replacement parts :) And Scalex has released some of their RTR bodies as model kits... The Mustang and Camaro are two of them as well as some rally cars and a DTM or 2....

I have a number of articles on my site to help new builders get started..
http://jbriggsk9.tripod.com/chrisbriggsslo...page/index.html

The whole idea behind the current proxy races were to get people back into building their own cars..... It is great fun and a good learning experience......

And it is not just building for the routed tracks... you can use the same ideas for making chassis for the plastic tracks too..... But you are better off using PC board or sheet styrene for your chassis and adding magnets if you like....

Chris
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
376 Posts
Gary

If you check my links section you will see where to go for other sites on building.. And one of the best places to ask questions is right here and some of the other boards......
As you have seen all the guys will be willing to help with any questions you have..

A better bunch of guys will be hard to find..


Chris.
 

·
Alan Tadd
Joined
·
4,030 Posts
A Flared wheel arch to ensure that at the maximum permitted track width of 2.5" the wheel is not visible when viewed from directly above the cars. Also known as guards.

Regards

Alan
 

·
Phil Kalbfell
Joined
·
3,373 Posts

·
Phil Kalbfell
Joined
·
3,373 Posts
Gary: Here are the links to some of the Tassie proxy sites.

Proxy racing started back in the '50's with Rail racers sending cars from the US to England to compete against each other. The recent revival istarted with the first Daytona West about 6 years ago and the internet makes comunication so easy. The builders usually know the results with hours of the race being run.

The real advantage is that the builders learn how their skills and designs compare against some of the best in the world.

Chris and Erling are two good examples of this. I have watched their skills and workmanship develop over the years.

http://www.geocities.com/h_m_c_c/
http://au.geocities.com/h_m_c_c/main.htm

http://au.geocities.com/tassie_tiger_proxy/

Phil
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top