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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I took up the challenge to make a 1963 ATS 100 from David Jones. There were bets I would not get a chassis under it since it is so narrow and low.
Thanks for your interest. Ken
 

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Ken,

That makes two folks who have figured out how to fit a chassis (and make it look good) inside that very slim and very low ATS shell...you and Dave Jones.

I'm thinking that your thread title might be NC-17. Pity.. Jon G. won't be allowed to view this.


Good show!

Cheers,

Mark
 

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Thanks for posting, I was beginning to think no one was building anything anymore. There haven't been any F1 scratchbuilds shown on here for a while.

Very nice build by the way - as you know perfectly!!

Are they Ranch 64 pitch gears?

Andi
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Hello Andi

The gears are the tiny Ranch Design 64 pitch that are a boon the the GP scratch builder. The 24 tooth crown gear is only 9.5mm in diameter and sets lower than the motor. You have to have perfect alignment between the pinion shaft and the rear axle so the motor in my chassis has a tilt to it to keep the weight low and the tiny body to fit. Everything you see in the picture weighs less than 50 grams even with a 2.5 gram floating weight plate on the bottom.

Regards Ken
 

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Tony Condon
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Hi
The ranch gears look great
how do i get hold of some?

cheers tony
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Here is a better shot of the chassis to show the small size of the Ranch Design gears are in relationship to the FF-050 motor. I had my doubts about the tiny gears holding up and made a couple of thousand laps on these just to make sure they will hold up to 6 proxy races. I am impressed on how well they work, their smoothness and the durability of the 64 pitch gear teeth.

Regards
Ken

 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
EM

Thank you for your kind words. It is very nice to read a compliment from one of my heroes who I look up to when it comes to scratch building.

When I laid out the suspension for this car I remembered the issue you has last year so I made it narrow enough that I could use shims to get it to just under the maximum width of
50mm. The uprights have a Slot It axle bushing soldered into a tapered recess on them, you can see them is you look close. Building this chassis has been a great learning experience.

Regards
Ken
 

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Al Schwartz
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QUOTE (mmmoose1 @ 24 Sep 2011, 16:38) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>EM

Thank you for your kind words. It is very nice to read a compliment from one of my heroes who I look up to when it comes to scratch building.

Regards
Ken

Very gracious and appreciated, Ken - but from what I have seen on various boards and taking into account race results, (these are, after all, racing cars) if you are looking my way it is certainly no more than a level gaze. Please keep in mind that due respect for your elders - and I am "elder" than almost anyone on this board - requires that you do not disagree with me on this point!

EM (Vintage 1936)
 

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Jon Grainger
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Hi Ken,

I must say that this is a superb looking build, very clean and neat, and great attention to detail. The complex rear suspension is a good example of the detailing on this model, especially with such a tight fit!

How did you fabricate the rear end/suspension/arms? I am building something similar for an event over here in England, on a Ferraro 500 F2 car, but using plastic rods etc. Any advice would be greatly appreciated. Also, the springs themselves?

Regards
Jon
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Jon

The easiest way to do the suspension bits in plastic is to borrow them from a RTR car that has something close. I have bought a whole pile of Scaley front and rear suspensions from their GP classic lines for other cars that I have built over the years and stuck them on brass chassis's. To do what I did on this car out of plastic would be time consuming since glue dries so much slower than solder cooling. Do not be afraid of bending wire, it is cheap and easy to work with. I bend up lots of pieces to get two to match all it takes is some practice.

The springs for the shocks is very easy. My local hobby shop sells stainless steel tubing in very small sizes, the size I use for the shock body is .042 or 1.1mm which works out to 1 3/8ths inches in scale. to make the spring I take a 3 inch piece of it and cut a small slot across the end like a flat blade screwdriver slot and clean off the burrs on each end, I then put he end without the slot in a pin vice. This then becomes the tool for winding the spring. I strip off a piece of indoor telephone wire about 6 inches long to get the copper wire inside. I take one end of the copper wire and put it down the center of the tube and fold it over one off the slots. I then carefully wind the cooper wire around the tube evenly till it gets to the end. All the wire should be wrapped up tight on the tube now, to get the spacing needed, you take your thumbnail and stick it in between the first coil of wire all the way down to the tube. Start turning the tool the same direction you wound the wire on with your thumb nail touching the tube this will give the coil it's spacing. Gently remove the coil from the tube and paint it with a spray can the color you want. Cut two more pieces of tube the length that you need for the shock body and remove the burs. I put piano wire down the center of the tube to mount it to the body or chassis as needed and hold it together with a drop of super glue. Take your now dry coil spring and cut it gently with a new Exacto blade a coil or so longer than your tube. Slide the spring back on the tube with a turning motion so you screw the wire onto the tube. Gently close up the gap in the coil for the top and bottom of the spring and you now have a coil over shock in small scale like the ones on the back of the chassis. It will take a few tries to get it right but in the end it is easy when you get comfortable doing it.

EM, I will always look up to you as a wise man who knows his craft. There are many things for me to learn yet.

Thank you all for the positive feedback. Ken
 
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