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Most of you slot car guys from way back will have boxes full of period race goodies, both old used and NOS, but where can us newbies to the scratch built scene find the pukka parts?...I am looking for suitable parts for the STP indy car, but not too quickly because I love the search....mainly period guide, tuned motor (6mm hole in plate), axle spacers, taylor gear etc..all I have is a shoe box full of sixties strombecker parts like these_ ken





looks like a nice car can be made of this....the frame fits the shell perfectly and are those cox mag wheels?
 

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Ken - where are you?

If in England (or even if not), both Phil Smith and Derek Cooper have good stocks of all sorts of parts, and their own websites. They're also at many swap meets, and Phil's Orpington swap meet is coming up very soon.

I've been accumulating stuff for some 20 odd years and it's changed over time - but you can be sure that, no matter how much you have, you'll never have the part you need when you start building!

Lots on ebay are good sources of various parts, and you can probably still get some fairly cheaply. For some stuff, there's also EJ's Hobbies and Electric Dreams in the US.

Sort of depends what you want to do with this car too; the Cox Ford GT wheels are nice, but probably not what the Turbine car was running... (hmm, just looked at mine, they're not all that different, but probably a little narrower and taller than the real ones).

Don
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for your input Don ..I am in UK more specifically Lancashire...the wheels came with it and I have used some strombecker 1/8 axles for now to see how the car stands....looks pretty cool....what kind of wheels did you reckon were more appropriate for the car...lower profile and wide sponge tyred perhaps slim fronts , I would like your opinion?
I have been collecting chassis and bits off and on for years on ebay and salting them away...I just fancy building some cars as raced at club circuits in the 60s and 70s for pleasure of building up with correct as used in the day!...mainly for display, but would prefer them to be ready to run.
Thanks for the ideas..ken
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks Michael....very interesting ....some dispute there, but I want the Paxton indy to look like a period slot car, rather than an exact scale replica, so I am OK!
Thanks also for ressurecting this post as I am on the hunt for period parts now, having commisioned a "HOT" motor which should be flying in soon.
Any ideas on guides for the period 67-70?
There are some DYNAMIC ONES ON EBAY,but are they like the ones used on the club scene of the day?...ken
 

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In 1967 and through 1970, the guides "to have" were the Cox "Quick-Change", the Dynamic "Quick-Change" (both with braid clips) and the one that simply took over by 1969, the SimCo "Jet Flag".
There were plenty of others on the market but none was as effective and none other was used by serious racers.
Meanwhile in the Midwest where the really fast 1/32 scale guys were, the fixed pin-style guide was not only king but imperial. Those guys would not even consider a moving guide! On a 1/32 scale narrow-nose car, it makes all the sense in the world since a conventional guide requires trimming of the body sides, that is a very inelegant way to proceed...
 

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In 1/32 scale, if a pin guide was not used, the black nylon Revell was the guide of choice, being somewhat smaller and tidier than the others mentioned.
 

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Actually, I think that the white Monogram guide is even smaller and tidier than the Revell version, but they're a little harder to find. Monogram also made a couple different sizes, but I find them generally easier to use than the Revells.

I also remember a column in an English or American magazine saying that he had found the Monogram guide better than the Revell, based on a track test!

The other possibility is a reverse guide, pivoting from the front instead of the rear. Cox made one of these, for the Super Cuc I think, but they're rare and expensive. There's also a version by GarVic, but it's not as practical - or you can make your own, if you've got a drill press, or a steady hand... (cut off post, redrill a hole in front, put in 1/8" rod of some sort).

Keep us up to date on this project Ken, love the STP Turbine!

Don

PS: thanks!
 
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