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Peter Seager-Thomas
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1,214 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
An MGA was the second car I owned and thus I have a soft spot for them. A car with a genuine racing parentage with those parents having always held a fascination for me, in particular the 1955 Le Mans cars. The introduction of the SCX rally cars provided a fairly quick means to provide such a model. The picture below shows almost the standard car, the non-standard part being the etched wheels.



This will be a fairly swift build if I can get the paint on before the weather breaks, with probably less than half a dozen progress entries. The first of the entries involves the strip down and one small mod.

My first action was to determine how easy the plastic (from which the body is made) is to work on. The fact that in a few places paint has been applied was encouraging. My test medium was Cyano adhesive (Superglue) and proved positive after light abrasion of the surface.
Armed with the knowledge that the project was practical/possible, a rapid strip down was made, rapid that is, except for the last bit.

Most attachments were made by means of the usual method, a plastic spigot melted with a soldering iron. A brief test with a scalpel showed that the melted spigot was easily chipped off and the attached part removed. The order was lighting assembly, bumper, sidelights, cockpit assembly, rear lamps, fuel tank cap, wipers, mirror and screen. The operation was not rushed, and took perhaps an hour.

Less easy were the headlamps which were almost certainly Superglued in place. I hate wasting parts, so even though I was not going to use these parts I wished to keep them in good order. The lamps were detached by a gradual process with removal of material from behind the lamps. Once the lamp mounting boss on the inside was removed, pressure on the remaining parts of the lamps was sufficient to remove the lamps. One rim was split (separate 'chromed' parts) but both lamps were left with about 1mm of the original mounting spigot intact.

The one part left undisturbed was the grille. Most of the slats on the right hand side required removal, thus it was felt preferable to support the grille during the removal process. With a few holes drilled, shaping was started. One of the grille mounting spigots was located in the area to be removed, so as work progress, removal of material became more and more gentle. Eventually the spigot was detached, and finishing was done with extreme care. On completion, the grille was removed, and the supporting bodywork cut back a little. The images below show work to date.





Body interior;



I feel no need to modify any part of the actual chassis.



Comments;

The body on this car is very strong. The force exerted to finally remove the headlamps was very great indeed, not so much as a crack was made.

As built the performance is effective with good grip from the tyres. My test track is non-magnetic so I can't comment on this aspect. The move to the narrower Scaley tyres has been detrimental to performance.

The next progress entry should hopefully take things up to the stage where the body is ready for paint.

Peter.
 

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Premium Member
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572 Posts
Hi Peter,
Looking good so far! It's amazing what a difference just a good set of wheels can make to the overall look of a car. I'm amazed manufacturers don't spend more time on the design of them they can make or mar an otherwise good model.
Cheers,
Tom.
 

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Registered
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408 Posts
Thanks for putting this up Peter. I see the grill is being worked on. This is what I did to the Monogram MGA. I'm separating all that section along with the bumpers and rear lights. I'm also using the SCX MGA for parts. I'm clad I have a set wire wheels for this car because it looks so much better with them on. I look forward to see what you do here mate. Great start!
 

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Senior Slot Car Mechanic
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2,230 Posts
Nuvo, look at the pics again, the wheels are already changed. Makes the car look brilliant.

Nice job Peter, as always.
 

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Peter Seager-Thomas
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1,214 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thank you gentlemen for you kind comments. Just a little more progress.



The body was filled using an epoxy adhesive which is worked easily with a knife when half hard and with a file when hard. It is also very sticky.

Areas filled were the recess for the windscreen, the recess under the front shroud for the bumper and all the holes which would be unused. It was really just the locations for lamps which remained.



After much fettling the body received the first of what will be many coats of primer from an automotive spray can. The intention is that it will act as a primer/filler.

The only real detail remaining on the car after stripping is the scuttle vents, which were masked off.



Apologies for the photo quality. I thought I would get away without the flash. I didn't....

The car is mounted for spraying on a piece of ply with a self tapper coming through the centre to hold a small crocodile clip in place. It works well.

Peter.
 
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