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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just wondering about a truck on the track but I’m a bit concerned that the motor would overheat dragging the extra weight around. I remember that the 1980s Scalextric trucks used another reduction gear, is there somewhere that sells this kind of thing?
 

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You can buy different gears from a few companies, probably Slot It are the best known, if you were to run an 8 tooth pinion and a 30 tooth crown the gearing should be low enough, you can also get high torque motors like Ninco Thrusters.

What sort of truck are you thinking of?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
QUOTE (Julian_Boolean @ 23 Sep 2011, 15:11) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>You can buy different gears from a few companies, probably Slot It are the best known, if you were to run an 8 tooth pinion and a 30 tooth crown the gearing should be low enough, you can also get high torque motors like Ninco Thrusters.
Cheers, dude. I think a standard car is with a 9 tooth pinion and 26 tooth crownwheel, so the ratios you mentioned might do it. That would certainly be simpler!

QUOTE (Julian_Boolean @ 23 Sep 2011, 15:11) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>What sort of truck are you thinking of?
One that looks good&#8230; something American and big. I need to look into it more closely, but if the truck was done in resin with a linkage, you could do a pretty simple trailer from plastic sheet. Just toying with another project&#8230;.
 

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Standard car is usually 9/27 giving 3:1

So are you going Kenworth or Peterbilt?
And a big ol' Johnson 222 motor might be what you're looking for.
 

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80 pitch slot car gears are available in 6 or 7 tooth pinions and 44 - 48 pitch spurs, so you can get 7.something to 1 (which is what a lot of the quicker slot cars use these days). Is that enough reduction for your truck?

If you want to go for a two stage reduction, then probably the easiest way of doing it is to use a 2mm diameter idler shaft carrying an axle gear and pinion.
2mm axles are now quite common in quicker slot cars, so there 2mm bore axle gears are readily available, and of course 2mm is the most common bore for pinions.
Scratch building a back end with an idler shaft is somewhat more work than a conventional set up, but it's really no more difficult than setting up an ordinary set of gears - just doing it twice.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
QUOTE (Datto @ 23 Sep 2011, 15:36) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Choc- Ice is moving on to "Duel"?

I don't have anything too specific in mind, but it's something that could be some fun to try around a track. And like my police car, they were pretty common in car chases on TV&#8230;

QUOTE (300SLR @ 23 Sep 2011, 15:38) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>80 pitch slot car gears are available in 6 or 7 tooth pinions and 44 - 48 pitch spurs, so you can get 7.something to 1 (which is what a lot of the quicker slot cars use these days). Is that enough reduction for your truck?

If you want to go for a two stage reduction, then probably the easiest way of doing it is to use a 2mm diameter idler shaft carrying an axle gear and pinion.
2mm axles are now quite common in quicker slot cars, so there 2mm bore axle gears are readily available, and of course 2mm is the most common bore for pinions.
Scratch building a back end with an idler shaft is somewhat more work than a conventional set up, but it's really no more difficult than setting up an ordinary set of gears - just doing it twice.
Another set of reduction gears would be extra work in the chassis, so if I can do it with just the regular pinion and crown I'd rather try that first.

QUOTE (Julian_Boolean @ 23 Sep 2011, 15:38) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>How about this?

http://www.revell.com/model-kits/snaptite/85-1964.html

or

http://www.revell.com/model-kits/snaptite/85-1961.html

or

http://www.revell.com/model-kits/snaptite/85-1958.html
One of the first two. Made of pure WIN!
 

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Tore
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My Fly M.A.N truck won it's class in the previous Fly Truck proxy series. It's got a big brass plate under the chassis and weights about 180 grams. It has the stock Fly truck motor (15.000 RPM) and was down geared from 3.0 to 3.5 ratio (8/28), but that was a bit short on the large commercial style tracks. It goes pretty good on my plastic home track, even down to 10 volts.

The Ninco NC-7 (raid motor) is also a 15.000 RPM motor with good torque that can pull a lot of weight.
 

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Al Schwartz
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Well, the "formal" answer is that I was doing a P99 - the prototype has an asymmetrical cockpit with the drive-shaft running down the left side:



The "real" answer is: Just to see if it could be done!

Did it work? - Sort of - after a lot of re-work by David Lawson!

EM
 
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