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Jon Grainger
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3,825 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi guys,

I'm after some advise, on constructing a 'Richard Mack' chassis. I recently purchased one from Dave Farrow, and I'm a litle bit stumped with which parts need soldering together? The questions relate to the picture above them.

Very kindly, David supplied the car with most parts in position, and held together with sellotape, which has helped a great deal. This is how the chassis came:




Firstly, the pillar blocks seems designed to fit oilite bearings, which is fine, and then can be adjusted in their position to get the required ride height. However, as you can see from the picture, there seems to be other pillar blocks, which have cut outs at the bottom in various positions, which I pressumed was to adjust the wheelbase. However because this will bring the motor out of line for the gear mesh, I cant understand what these are?


Secondly, I've made this diagram of where I think the chassis needs soldering. The black arrows are joints that I am confident need soldering (However Im willing to be advised
) and the red arrows for solder joints Im not sure if that is the correct location to solder them. Also, am I missing any joints that need soldering? Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

Finally, as the rear pillar blocks cant be moved the adjust the wheelbase, I pressume this has to be set from the front ones only, which also have slots cut in? Am I right in thinking that?

Hope you can help!
Regards
Jon
 

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WOW, it seems that you are going to need a lot of cooling clams
, Liquid tin would perhaps be a good start, good luck. I'm really curious about the end result.
Cheers,
Danny
 

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Jon, I think you are confusing the alternative FRONT pillar blocks with the correctly identified and laid out single pair of rear pillar blocks. As Mr Secchi states build the rear first,using two spur gears ONE tooth larger than intended,then install the motor. Now remove the oversize spurs and re-fit the intended spur. If your chosen god is with you and you,ve said your prayers often enough , then you should have an acceptable gear mesh with just perceptable backlash. Now you can refer to the multiple choice FRONT pillar blocks which will allow a limited wheelbase adjustment with oilite bearings and a 3/32 axle.Good luck and don,t forget your goggles.
 

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Hi Jon
The way you've laid the bits out looks about right.
The gear side pillar block has a top leg facing forward, that will need bending so it sits flat along the end of the motor can. That's one of the places the motor will be soldered in.
In additions to the sound advice from Ralph, its well worth looking at the build tips and instructions on Richard Mack's web site http://www.mackslotracing.com
Although the chassis you have is not exactly the same as shown on Richard's web site, the parts work in the same way as the ES32 and G12 Saloon chassis except for the different front wheel attachment.

If you want you could contact Richard Mack with any questions, he is one of the most helpful people you could come across. (contact details on his web site)

Chris
 

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Hi Jon,
A couple of extra bits of information.

You will need to solder the central hinge pin to the two mounting blocks on the motor box, otherwise it will fall out.
Do not solder the pin to the two mounting blocks in the front part of the chassis otherwise you will lose the intended twisting movement between the front and rear.

I would use the other front pillar blocks. The ones at the top of your first photo.
These are designed to use a 1/16" piano wire front axle.
The round things at the top of each pillar block are wheel retaining washers, cut them off you'll need them later.
The wheelbase is set by the tabs on the bottom of the pillar blocks. By choosing which pair you use and which way round you fit them into the slots in the main chassis you can get a whole variety of different wheelbases.
To fit your front wheels mount them on a length of 3/32" od brass tube, this will be a nice running fit on 1/16" piano wire, don't over tighten the grub screws or you will squash the tube and lose the running fit. Adjust the length of the tube between the pillar block and the back of the wheels to be equal each side and to give you the correct front track. Set up the chassis on a flat surface with packing for the correct ground clearance. Place the 1/16" axle through the pillar block slots. Slip the wheels onto the axle and let them rest on your flat surface then solder the axle to the pillar blocks. Shorten the axle as needed and use those little washers you cut off earlier to retain the wheels by soldering them to the outer end of the axle inside the wheel. Use a paper washer between the wheel and the retaining washer whilst doing the soldering, it will prevent solder from penetrating the wheel and, when removed, give you a little end float to allow the wheel to rotate freely. You will now have independently rotating front wheels.

I'm sure someone has already told you this but, and it's worth repeating, you will need an active flux to solder spring steel.
I use Staybrite which is available from SCD or ABSlotsport.
You must also scrub your chassis clean after soldering with kitchen cleaner and a toothbrush/nail brush/scouring pad or it will, very quickly go rusty.

It's all actually easier to do than to explain in words.
Cheers.
****.
 

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David Farrow
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1,242 Posts
Hi Jon and all the others looking

Well you are pretty much there. When the kit left me the rear pillar blocks were in place. This is one of the things that won't change. The thing that is throwing some confusion into the mix is the options for front axles. The 1st generation of chassis had the front axle in 3/32 bearings and pillar blocks. There are extra uprights, or front pillar blocks of different wheelbases as there are guide lugs for different guide lengths.

I took these pictures of your chassis as I cut it out and put it together. Please note this is a dry assembly and it will have to be dissembled to get flux to the right places. As **** K pointed out you will have to use an Acid Flux. Both Andy Brown of ABSlotsport and Chaz from SCD will be able to sort you out with this stuff but be warned…. Its nasty! Probably the most aggressive thing in the house.

This is how the kit comes and to look at it can look a little daunting but it is so well made it fits together very well. You have to bear in mind, Richard Mack is a hard core world class Eurosport racer and he designed a chassis that, to him, is very simple.



Now take a deep breath and pick up your Demell and cut out the bits so you end up with this little lot. Do not cut out the pans as this is the very last thing you do.



Start at the back, it only goes together one way.



Put in the 4 saddles and the spine.



The rear pan hangers.



The front pan support lugs



The front pan support



And the front pan retainer.



The guide lug, guide spacer and guide tab.





Add the pin tubes, front axle, motor, gears and body and away you go. No need to bend the motor support as you can see it runs nicely across the top.



On this chassis I used the pillar blocks with bearings on the front axle and then cut the redundant bit of the top.
You may have noticed the spine is soldered in on one end and only one end pivots, this is common practice in BSCRA racing.



I don't really recommend a Falcon…way to fast.

Incidentally I don't what anyone thinking I sold this to Jon and ran, this post was the first I knew of any difficulty he was having… I did offer to build it for him but some sour remarks from someone put him off.

If you need and more pictures or any other kind of help just let me know. I may not be the best chassis builder around but that's the beauty of this gem, you don't need to be.
 

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Jon Grainger
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3,825 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Hello guys,

Thank you for your posting's. May I confirm that Dave didnt 'sell and run', it has been the complete opposite, and he has been most helpfull. The reason for my posting was to try and gather ideas, and also to learn if there where any other methods of construction and the various tips, all of which I have been given.

Regards
Jon
 

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Premium Member
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Hi Jon,
David's photo guide is very good and if you follow that you will be ok.
If you're building this for CSCRA racing, with 1.5mm ground clearance, I would leave out the guide tab spacer.
Just solder the guide tab directly to the top of the chassis.
These chassis are designed for a standard Jet Flag (as made by Parma, Cahoza, Slick 7 etc) so do make sure you set the guide tab far enough back so that the body will cover the guide.
Cheers.
****.
 

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David Farrow
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1,242 Posts
Hi Jon, Bill, Dave and others that are looking in.

I think this chassis has struck more fear and trepidation into grown men than the tax office!

It is quite simple but you have to be at ease with a Demell and a soldering iron to feel comfortable with it.
Some of you may have been onto Richards's web site and seen there's no trace of this particular chassis. This is not a type of chassis he normally makes, scale slot-cars hold no interest to him. He designed this one after a request from some guy in Brazil and thinks of it as a bit of a one off. I don't know if they were shipped over as kits or built. The only one I have seen built was Richards own, he showed it to me some 3 or 4 years ago. I was lucky enough to get one chassis off him and I know some other people also had one but I think there's were put into in project boxes and have yet to see the light of day. So as it stands I know Richard has made some, I have made some and maybe a guy in Brazil may have made some, that's it. There was some talk of a racing class for them using scale vac formed bodies but I don't think it went any further. The time Richard spends on his hobby is very much in demand and my pleas for another of this oddball chassis were considered a low priority. He builds all his chassis in batches and I had to convince him it was worthwhile. The one I had under My March 707 drew many envious looks and I simply could not convince him he could sell more if they were available. During the BSCRA area rounds last year I had another go at him and I think he worked out the only way to shut me up was to get some made so I became the proud owner of more than I had expected. I have sold the excess to other slot-racers and I think they too are in trepidation of the masterpiece they behold. Maybe with a Christmas brake and this post we will see the others take to the track, which is where they belong.

If there are others that would like one of these chassis please send me a PM and if there is enough interest then I will ask Richard if he would make more. He seldom sells chassis through his website and uses a network of dealers. The UK dealer is Dave Harvey of one-0-one and he is one hell of a slot-racing legend…that most of you probably wont of heard of. This is the other side of slot-racing, all 27 turns of 26g and quad mags in setups! I very much doubt if he knows anything of this particular chassis though he could sell you the flux, and guide. I don't know if Mr Harvey would do anything as lowly as oilights and 64 pitch gears, he still can't understand why anyone would want anything as slow as a Falcon.

All the best and get you soldering iron nice and hot..and merry Christmas

David Farrow
 

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QUOTE Maybe with a Christmas brake and this post we will see the others take to the track, which is where they belong.
Hi David,
There aren't too many hard bodies that these chassis will fit under. Only the big Can-Am cars are really wide enough.
The Can-Am event at Presto Park in February allows vac forms and is the perfect opportunity to get these chassis up and racing.
I am currently planning to put one under a Betta 1970 AVS Shadow (yes the tiny tyre Shadow) for that event.
I know **** T is also planning to run his, but under something much bigger.

I like the idea of scale vac form Can-Am racing.
I have all of the Betta shells and several chassis they will fit onto.
How about an event for them at Wellingborough? We could even race on both tracks on the same day.

Cheers.
****.
 

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David Farrow
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1,242 Posts
Hi everyone

I think it would be fun…but it would also be Turkeys voting for Christmas. Your UOP shadow is distressing enough. If you bring it on the 28th I could take some pictures of it and show the world how a TSRF chassis should have been made.
I have often thought a race meeting where we have to use the same car on both tracks would be good. As a second class we could run 3Lt F1 cars. But when and is there anyone else interested.

all the best

David Farrow
 

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Hi Jon,
Just to re-iterate general soldering points. Clean out all the holes with a needle file and also the 'prongs' that are going to fit into them. Be very careful to put your (quality) acid flux only where you want it (I use a fine point paint brush). If you can, put oil (again very carefully) where you don't want the solder to flow. Use a minimum amount of solder - if the joints are clean, it will flow OK. Clean everything with warm soapy water every time you pause for breath, and dry it.
If you clean and dry fit everything before doing any soldering, it should go togther without much problem.
Good luck and see you at EB
Mark
 

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Russell Sheldon
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2,855 Posts
Superb 'how-to' article, David.

It's been a while since I've built a Eurosport style chassis. Can anyone please explain the advantage of the 'saddles' used to locate the central pivot, over using old-style tube and piano-wire, please? I'm guessing that it's to induce 'rear-end steering'?

I believe that Andre Acker from Rio De Janeiro, Brazil, was behind this chassis and it's called a "Macker" (Richard Mack / Andre Acker).

Andre has a passion for 1/32nd scale Can-Am cars and I believe that he has had quite an extensive range of Lexan produced.

With kind regards,

Russell
 

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David Farrow
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1,242 Posts
Hi Russell

You could be right with the Ander Acker connection.

I don't think there is any real advantage with the saddles over tube and rod, there's no steering in this chassis. I'm not too sure it would work with rubber tyres and the inherent low grip. I believe Mack originally designed the chassis for sponge.

All the best to everyone and I had better get on with building something rather than messing around with this.

Df
 

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Premium Member
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Hello chaps

Russell wrote
Can anyone please explain the advantage of the 'saddles' used to locate the central pivot, over using old-style tube and piano-wire, please? I'm guessing that it's to induce 'rear-end steering'?

The piano wire used to wear the brass tube in time and needed replacement or to be dinted back to a close fit. This way the steel-on steel doesn't wear so fast if oiled and you don't have that awkward bit of different-height soldering with bare wire at the front and wire in tube at the rear.

Plus there's plenty of scope with CAD and EDM to design and make all these little widgets, where before you used to have to bend piano wire, curse, throw it away, bend again, curse (repeat ad infinitum). Happy days.

FLBT Christmas Trophy tonight, must find a nice ball...

CHeers, Rob
 

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Yes indeed the chassis was designed by Andre Acker, he came to NLondon last year with a prototype which worked very well.
Andre also does some good quality vac formed lexan bodies to fit, the two he had with him were the McLaren M8D and Ferrari 712 but he might now do others.
[oneofwos]
 
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