SlotForum banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
John Roche
Joined
·
4,158 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The original Scaley 1:24 track was marketed as suitable for outdoor use.

I was wondering if anyone has ever tried routing track in plastic instead of wood?

What could you use instead of copper tape or braid to supply power?

It could be fun to race in the rain (from inside the house) :)

Cheers,

John
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,883 Posts
VFR
You might find this link on routed plastic interesting.
It's worth following another link in that thread to the home site.
CNC Routed Plastic

I must say I quite like the idea of racing in genuine wet conditions.
May have to train the dog to fetch back deslotted cars though!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,883 Posts
"Crash and Drown " rules - I like that!

Track conductivity in less than ideal conditions got me thinking - I wonder if anyone has any thoughts on the use of the 'Relco' unit used in model train tracks? I have never used one, but the principle seems to be to blast high frequency current through the track to 'burn off' the accumulated crap and enhance pick-up collection.
 

·
Al Schwartz
Joined
·
3,378 Posts
Corrosion of the contact strip would be a problem - unless, of course, one could find a source of stainless steel braid ( commonly used to armor high pressure fluid lines like brake lines) in the right size or, alternatively, negotiate for gold plated copper braid.

The link to the CNC routed PVC track is interesting - I have spoken with them and it is more expensive than home routed MDF but not in the league with professionally built track. I briefly thought about using PVC for home routed track but disgarded the idea. While a CNC router offers precise control of cutting speed, I think it would be difficult to control hand routing well enough to avoid the possibility of going too slowly and melting the plastic.

Weather related expansion and contraction might also be an issue. I don't think that water shorting the track would be an electrical problem. The resistance of rain water is pretty high. On the other hand, racing in the rain might throw a different light on car weight, tread compound and tread pattern - water is a good lubricant for rubber surfaces. (boat prop shafts run in water immersed rubber bearings)

Depending on location, there might be others hazards as well. Several years ago, my daughter was populating a sand castle with toy aminals about the size and weight of a light 1/32 car. A gull swooped down, grabbed one of the toys and flew away, depositing it in the ocean about 100 yards offshore!

EM
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
773 Posts
...outside racing is possible - we did it frequently with Carrera-track - and even racing in teh rain is possible - but you need cars with mags - otherwise it's not a lot of fun.



Most fun have been the SCX-4WD-cars with mags - even they drifted around the curves
 

·
John Roche
Joined
·
4,158 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Racer Magazine has just arrived. There's an article by a guy who's into garden model railways. apparently nickel silver is the thing to have for weather resistance and conductivity. Does anyone know where to get rolls of braid or strip?

Cheers,

John
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,883 Posts
I think Racer Mag must be getting short of subject material to branch out into garden railways! But it does remind me of partially formed, ancient thoughts that N gauge (N for Nine mm) nickel silver, rail track could make a fine starting point for a homegrown slot track system. The rails are already the ideal distance apart and it's very flexible. I have never got around to figuring out a cheap way of producing the actual running surface though. For other purposes, the rail section can be bought as plain strips without sleepers, in yard or possibly metre lengths, reasonably cheaply - used for scratch building, particularly for points/switch tracks. Not magnetic of course - a downside for some people.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top