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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've been reading the FAQ looking to identify how to run analog cars on my O2 track.
I am getting ready to install it all this week, however I in would like to run analog cars (rally style for instance) and I am wondering how to make this work, and what I would need.

Thanks.
 

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Greg Gaub
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You would need to set up the track like any other analog track. For O2 mode, short the power wires at the controller stations to send full power to the rails.
 

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Mr. Flippant is right. You can use O2 on any analog track, as long as you "short the power wires at the controller stations to send full power to the rails".
I recommend putting a fuse in the loop (5A or 6A fast fuse), just in case you forget a screwdriver across the rails, or loose a screw...
It is a basic safety measure, indispensable if you run on power from a battery.
 

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^ my PSU has some sort of protection, I wonder if that would sufficient in place of the fuse? I don't have an analog powerbase, I have ran wires to the track directly. If I needed a fuse, would I put it on the positive wire?

In order to run analog cars, I am wonder if its possible to "chip" a lane and to use the SCP wirelessly.
I do not want to buy a powerbase / and would really like to use the SCP wirelessly...
 

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Greg Gaub
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I can't see why chipping a lane wouldn't work as well with oXigen as with the "classic" solutions. Just run your power to the chip's braid leads, and then the chip's motor leads to the rails.
 

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It will run fine until you short the rails together.


Rich
 

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Greg Gaub
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Oh yeah.. hehe. same with using other chips, it's a good idea to put a fuse in the lead from the chip to the rails.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
should the fuse go either lead on the track side (or going toward the track).

When you run analog, I guess you have to eliminate any power bridges between the lanes (think ssc Lc)
 

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There are far more short circuits on the track than you think (quite often braids cause shorts when cars are put back on track after deslotting).
I recommend AGAINST use of the O2 chip to do this. The output of the chip is not protected against short circuits and you WILL end up frying the chip.
IF you really want to try, at least use a 2A fast fuse - which is likely to trip in normal conditions.... In any case this is untested and absolutely not recommended.

Regards
Maurizio
 

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QUOTE (MrFlippant @ 27 Apr 2012, 10:12) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>You would need to set up the track like any other analog track. For O2 mode, short the power wires at the controller stations to send full power to the rails.

Mr Flippant already answered the actual qquestion.
An O2 track is simply a track with 12 volts - or thereabouts on the rails, and some O2 controllers and chipped cars - and usually an O2 dongle and software on a conputer to count laps - but not needed for practice.

But if that isn't clear, think of it backwards.

1) Take any ordinary "analogue" track (without even any lane changers in it), make up a plug that goes into each controller station which simply provides a "short" (connection), from the pin which brings power to the controller, to the pin which is meant to deliver the output power FROM the controller to one track rail.

You now have an O2 (oXigen) track without any lane changers. Proceed to put O2 chipped cars on it, do the ID and race wireless analogue
- I am doing this at present for testing and learning O2 at home until I have a functional O2 track.

2) If you want to change lanes - install lane changers. - up to now you cn use your existing timing system since the cars stay in one lane.

There is just one downside to this. If you come out of your lane and land in another one, but continue to drive - you will drive as normally - under the powe of YOUR controller, not the controller of the driver of "that lane" as would happen with ordinary analogue racing. So you miss some laps and do not come out of the slot except by your own error - and you may not notice for a lap or two


3) If you want to change lanes and still be able to count laps, you need an O2 dongle, and the O2 software installed on your computer.

Congratulations it is now a full O2 digital system

A great thing about this as O2 is that someone who races at an O2 club does not have to OWN an O2 track at home to practice and tune O2 cars - all they need is one O2 controller of their own, and chipped cars on an ordinary "analogue" track.... meraviglioso, fantastico, magnifico
 

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QUOTE You now have an O2 (oXigen) track without any lane changers. Proceed to put O2 chipped cars on it, do the ID and race wireless analogue
- I am doing this at present for testing and learning O2 at home until I have a functional O2 track.

correct me if I am wrong, but once you put a chip in a car its not longer analog. So what you are suggesting not analog but just digital with not lane changers.
Wireless analog would be IF slot.it would provide a module to plug into the track and would interpret signals from the untethered SCP.01

In short very similar to what I asked / suggested of chipping a lane. I thought at some point there was a mention of a future offering of such product if im not mistaken.
I wonder if it had been dropped.

I think it was this ?

 

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QUOTE (Profoxcg @ 10 May 2012, 23:09) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>correct me if I am wrong, but once you put a chip in a car its not longer analog. So what you are suggesting not analog but just digital with not lane changers.
Wireless analog would be IF slot.it would provide a module to plug into the track and would interpret signals from the untethered SCP.01

In short very similar to what I asked / suggested of chipping a lane. I thought at some point there was a mention of a future offering of such product if im not mistaken.
I wonder if it had been dropped.

I think it was this ?



Hi.
OK, there are two different things here:

1 - the CRI, in your picture: this is a radio interface which turns ANY Slot.it cartridge (including the universal digital) in a wireless one using O2 technology. The big difference between the CRI and chipping a lane is that with CRI, it is the cartridge which bears the burden of interfacing to the track - and the cartridges are well protected against short circuits. Like MrFlippant said - Not dropped, at all! But not a launch product yet.

2 - An O2 chipped car can run on an unmodified analog track with no problem. The only difference is that it will run at the track voltage minus a Schottky diode drop, that is, 0.4-0.5V loss at most. To do so, if you run the controller from the track's power, you certainly have three wires and some sort of jack. Solder a wire (with a fuse, 6A fast) between the battery and the track wire. This way, whenever you plug your O2 controller in the (analog) track's jack, your car will go just as if it was analog. This is what we do at the club - an unmodified analog track (with LCs of course) where we race analog and O2. If your O2 controller is run wireless, just prepare a plug according to the instrictions above, plug it in, and go.

Regards
Maurizio
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Maurizio

For the scenario #1 with the CRI this is what I am understanding... (what does that stand for ,something, remote interface?)
The clear blue part is the high amperage analog cartridge that is connected to the CRI, AND the black wires are the wires that go into the track...
There, the car on that lane does not a chip, it is an analog car, and the controller is a SCP.1 with an O2 Cartridge. The O2 Cart, talks to the CRI which tells the blue analog Cart what to do, correct?

Now, for scenario #2, I understand up the point where you say you can run O2 chipped car in a regular analog track. beyond that I am confused. What is an O2 controller to you? To me it is SCP with an O2 cart and an untethered power source (9v battery). So I get confused when you say "If your O2 controller is run wireless, just prepare a plug according to the instrictions above, plug it in, and go."

The cable I have has a red and black banana plugs that I use to connect the 9v battery... Are you saying that those banana plugs can we connected to a track? Sorry Im not understanding, but I am happy to know the CRI is coming.
 

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Oh I understand now, very neat, but for those of us who have not been following, lets check?

So Today you own say an SCP-01 with a conventional Analog cartridge.

You purchace the Cartridge Radio Interface and plug your Analog Cartridge into the CRI leaving the track side connections unchanged.

Then you take an oXigen radio cartridge and plug it into your now empty SCP-01, pair them up, et voilà we have wireless?


The cartridge could of course, as Maurizio says, be any SCP-01 cartridge including the digital ones. Not the cheapest way of going wireless particularily if you have a number of controllers, but certainly a very neat solution, making great use of existing components.


Rich
 

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QUOTE (Profoxcg @ 11 May 2012, 08:30) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Maurizio

For the scenario #1 with the CRI this is what I am understanding... (what does that stand for ,something, remote interface?)
The clear blue part is the high amperage analog cartridge that is connected to the CRI, AND the black wires are the wires that go into the track...
There, the car on that lane does not need a chip, it is an analog car, and the controller is a SCP.1 with an O2 Cartridge. The O2 Cart, talks to the CRI which tells the blue analog Cart what to do, correct?
Yes, correct. And the same is true regardless of the 'end cartridge'. CRI - Cartridge Radio Interface.

QUOTE (Profoxcg @ 11 May 2012, 08:30) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Now, for scenario #2, I understand up the point where you say you can run O2 chipped car in a regular analog track. beyond that I am confused. What is an O2 controller to you? To me it is SCP with an O2 cart and an untethered power source (9v battery). So I get confused when you say "If your O2 controller is run wireless, just prepare a plug according to the instructions above, plug it in, and go."

The cable I have has a red and black banana plugs that I use to connect the 9v battery... Are you saying that those banana plugs can we connected to a track? Sorry Im not understanding, but I am happy to know the CRI is coming.

Yes, exactly. The red and black wires can go to the track. In principle, you have three wires for any track which is wired for braking:
1 - motor wire: this is the 'black' plug of an analog SCP1 cartridge. This is connected to the 'hot' rail of the track. In general, it is on the right side of the car
2 - power supply wire: the 'white' plug of an analog SCP1 cartridge. This is the power coming from the power supply.
3 - ground wire: the 'red' plug of an analog SCP1 cartridge.

Any modern track has these three wires. To adjust speed, if you have, say, a resistor based controller, a variable resistor sits between the white and black contacts: full voltage in, current flows through the resistor, reduced voltage (to car) out.

In my opinion the colouring convention of black, white, red for analog controllers is £%//$*\@!!!. So, with the O2 cartridge, we have followed the standard of red-power, black-ground.
If you went to, say, an analog club, you should
1 - plug the red O2 cartridge banana in the white female
2 - plug the black O2 cartridge banana in the red female (now you see that a red colour for ground that makes sense, uh?)
3 - short circuit the white and black females. This is where you want to use a fuse.

See image. there is a short made with the red wire with two yellow bananas running between the white and black females. In this case there's no fuse but It is highly recommended to have one, like in the cables in the top right of the image.


QUOTE (Profoxcg @ 11 May 2012, 08:34) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>another question, when you run analog and have left the ninco LC on the track, did you have to cut any wires underneath like you would with an SSD LC.

Yes, Ninco LCs come with shorting wires, which should be removed.


Manual is being updated to include this info.
 
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