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I was brought up as an orthodox Church of Scalextric 1/32 slot enthusiast but in the past decade or so I've been drawn towards the 1/24 heresy, partly because I don't have that many 1/32 classics left to get, partly because the big cars are such a large part of slot car history but mainly because the best of them are so cooooooool!

As of now I have just four restored 1/24 models and this thread covers the most recent of these. The Russkit Porsche 906 was a huge hit in 1966 and it's easy to see why. It's an almost perfect rendition of the real car, which itself is one of the most beautiful and successful racing cars of the 60s. What's less visible is its mechanical prowess. Russkit always tried to make fast slot cars and the 906 was one of the quickest production models of its time.

Wheel Tire Car Vehicle Motor vehicle

This is the one I got, Russkit artwork was also great. The model itself was mechanically good, with the only problem being an earlier 22 motor instead of the more powerful 23 and a different guide holder.

Tire Automotive tire Wheel Automotive design Vehicle

. . . . but the body was toast! Badly browned and cracks all over the place.

Liquid Drinkware Tableware Dishware Fluid

So back it went in its box while I pondered how to find a body worth restoring. Such problems have taken me a decade to solve so I wasn't holding my breath. Very luckily, I only had to wait a bit more than a year. During a bit of web intercourse with Pete Shepherd (SF member Scudbong) on another matter, I saw this lying on his workbench.

Car Vehicle Tire Motor vehicle Wheel

A few weeks later the red Russkit 906 body was mine, for a reasonable price. It had very minor cracks but everything was fixable (see later). After stripping in caustic soda (40 grams/liter for an hour or two) and a bit of scrubbing it was clean. It's the bottom one in the next pic, with the wrecked body above it.

Automotive parking light Automotive lighting Light Amber Rectangle

I was disappointed when I saw how much discolouration my new body had. Bleaching in sunlight for a couple of days and soaking in bleach improved only it a little bit. However, I decided to keep going because the windscreen areas were fine and the very brown bits in the pic are actually just an optical effect of looking through multiple body layers - they would go away when the body was sprayed. In fact none of this colouration was originally visible on the red-painted body.

So all I had to do was paint it red or pink or brown or pretty much anything except silver or white, right? Well, that wasn't an acceptable option - this car was going to end up looking like a Russkit Porsche 906 and that meant silver. Any brown/yellow tint would have to go down as Vintage Patina on a model that was, after all, 55 years old. Don't worry, this story is going to turn out OK.

OK, on to the body work. First, I needed to sort out the chassis mounting holes which were wrecked.

Brown Wood Beige Bag Tints and shades

I fixed this by gluing a supporting section, cut from a modern body, that covered the whole side chassis area (up to that fuzzy horizontal line in the pic above. I used a fast-setting flexible epoxy resin glue for this (Araldite Rapid). The required curvature was done by pre-bending the support section around a dowel rod then using the rod as a former during glue setting, with a heavy hammer to keep everything snug and a pair of scissors to transfer the pressure.

Brown Wood Rectangle Automotive tire Beige

Wood Tool Gas Auto part Metal

Then it just needed drilling little four little holes in the right places. That sounds easy but it was not, by a very long way! Any errors result in wheel misalignment, either vertical or horizontal or both. I got this wrong on one side and had to fill the holes and do it again. Getting a bit ahead of myself, here's the successful outcome.

Automotive tire Bumper Automotive exterior Rim Vehicle

The only other serious bit of body work was the lights. As all you Auld Slottie Experts know, 'blob' bodies didn't come with headlight detail and the Russkits were no different. For me that was just not good enough. The hard body Cox and Monogram beauties of the 60s all had faired-in headlights with clear covers and they all looked great. Why not give the same to the Russkit 906?

I fabricated headlight mountings from thin pieces of plasticard. This also turned out to be a lot harder than expected (by me, perhaps not by you!). But in the end I had a couple of mountings that fit more or less ok.

Wood Gas Flooring Rim Metal

Automotive parking light Hood Automotive lighting Grille Vehicle

Now I could actually start painting the body. Masking the windows and covers was tricky. I relied heavily on an excellent post by DC-65X in SlotBlog here, using Tamiya flexible masking tape. I used an old can of Humbrol silver enamel, diluted to 80% with Humbrol enamel thinners. Here it is, just out of the spray booth.

Toy Vehicle Car Motor vehicle Automotive design

Not plain silver but a nice antique pale yellow silver. Visually it seems more like a pale peach - either way, I like it a lot!

From there on it was plain sailing. Touch up the Russkit interior (a little bit of creative detailing on the driver's head and intake stacks), glue the headlight fairings in, apply some glue to the few small body cracks (on the inside), paint a bit of black detailing to inlets, outlets, wiper, wheel inserts, apply the repro decals, give them a thin coat of thinned enamel varnish to keep them there, assemble the body on the chassis, done!

Vehicle Wheel Car Land vehicle Tire

Car Vehicle Tire Hood Automotive design

Car Vehicle Hood Automotive design Automotive tire

Automotive lighting Hood Automotive design Motor vehicle Tin

Automotive lighting Vehicle Hood Motor vehicle Car

. . . and beside it, a job for another day!

Andy

Andy's other 1/24 Builds

Cox Lola T70

Cox Lotus 40

Cox Chaparral 2D
 

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Just the right touches. Nicely done!

All restoration projects should be encouraged to comply by keeping the BFH in view.

Open (silly) question: RE; stained butyrate and or lexan bodies

Has anyone experimented with hydrogen peroxide or effervescent denture cleaners for stain removal? It often works wonders in the styrene/abs world, when used judiciously.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
There's been lots of experimentation done, both with hydrogen peroxide and chlorine bleaches. Both seem to work quite well with some plastics such as those used for computer housings, especially when combined with lots of UV light (sunlight and lamps both work). None of this seems to work well for Butyrate, which is pretty much the universal plastic used for 60's blob bodies. The one exception I've seen is here on Slot Blog where somebody put a yellowed clear butyrate body between their window and the outer wire screen in a sunny region of the US, forgot about it for several months then it turned out to be completely clear.

Here are other relevant posts:

https://www.slotforum.com/forums/index.php?showtopic=154906

http://slotblog.net/topic/87887-getting-the-yellow-out-of-clear-bodies/

Andy
 

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Amen brother - the brethren welcome you.

But you must Cast Out that 22 and find a holy 23! Not to mention a Sacred green rear axle.

Very nice work in any case Andy; and I hear you brother, about the right holes in the body: most of my bodies have at least 2 where there should only be one...

I had one of these at the time, so late 66 or early 67 I would guess. I could never get it to work on our track, a high banked formica surfaced 8-lane thingie, for several essential reasons:

- Even at 15, I had absolutely no idea how to set up a kit car!

- The stock rubber tires didn't work on the track, and if you took the skin off to expose some lovely German sponge underneath, you no longer had any ground clearance. No room for gear and silicone slicks either, briefly in favor at our track before the closed cell spongies arrived.

I think this last point kept me from exploring any more and I eventually put the Russkit 23 motor in something else, muttering about those darned Russkits... flash forward 30 years or so, and I began to see these Carrera cars at various vintage meets. Crikey, they're fast! Especially those guys in Italy, who kind of grew up with Russkits and really knew how to prepare them. Anyway, I realized what good cars they are, very amenable to urethane tires and a good tire turning job, plus a bit of lead... and they can handle faster motors, even Franco's "stock" motors. (ciao Franco...).

Carry On Vicar Andy!

Don
 

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Gordon Steadman
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I've tried and failed to get one of these chassis going well. I know it's me as I borrowed one from Phil Smith at a Bordo meet and the thing was a joy to chuck around. There is obviously a secret that I have failed to discover.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I fear your doctrine lacks rigour, brother Donald. That rear axle has a morsel of the True Green, which can be discerned by dutiful and careful scrutiny of the picture. It is an alloy Russkit axle, with the orthodox spur gear and wheel. It also now has Ortmann tyres which show, even on my tiny track, that this car has some speed in it.

Regarding the 23, I do own a large pile of relics of motors but they are sitting with Brother Richard in Guilford CT. That's my brother, Richard. In this pile are both 22 and 23 cans so I have faith that a 23 with arise soon.

Brother Andrew
 

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I've set up a couple of these, motors aside ,the best change is keep the set screw wheels throw the axels in the bin along with the bearings as the axels are never straight and the bearings are to say the least a little slack,use proper drill blank axels and roller bearings front and rear glued or epoxied in chassis,and to get good gear mesh,turn the chassis upside down and put extra screws in the bottom to stop the drop arm moving sideways as the drop arm section also holds the motor as well,but the axel is in the chassis pan so any movement means a hell of a noise,once done you can then tune it properly also if using ortmans true them up and when you think there round true them again as I've never seen a set that aren't like concrete and never seen a round set either, but do all that and you have the basis of a fast car,my last one I went a bit mad and with some serious work put a 26d in one ,and yes it's a handful of
 

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I did a couple of endurance races for Barrie Wade when he was running Team Russkit over here in the latter 1960,s and that car was a joy to drive with the 23 motor in it and some weight added in differant places, that team was an eye opener at the time seeing new bits arriving from the USA at fairly regular intervals, like 12 23's in a special case, had the chance to own 2 of those Porsche's but had mooved on to Champion , B idiot thinking back now.
 

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Just looking at your pics and you may have had problems with your pin holes ect as in the pics your mounting wires are back to front.the straight bit goes in front and the curvy bit at the back
 

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Just looking at your pics and you may have had problems with your pin holes ect as in the pics your mounting wires are back to front.the straight bit goes in front and the curvy bit at the back
I've just checked this against the Russkit Carrera instruction sheet and it says not. To be honest, it never occurred to me to check and that's the way they came in the mail. What makes you say it should be straight bit at the front? It shouldn't affect body-chassis alignment because both ends have wires that go through the holes at roughly 90 degrees to the body but maybe it affects the ease of assembly or the robustness of the anchorage?

Many thanks to both you and Peter for your comments on your past Russkit adventures. I definitely want to work with one and get it to perform well. That's why I got two from the same seller. My other one already has ball bearings on the rear axle and a rewound 27 motor.

Andy
 

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Gordon Steadman
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The Parma ones are the same shape I assume. I have always put them in so the curved bit is at the front and the straight at the back. Apart from anything else, that way round means, that should they come loose, the wire comes out with the front still attached and it will do less damage to the body if you come off....unless you go in backwards of course!
 

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Just that everyone one I've seen has them the other way around,but if the instructions say otherwise I stand corrected,as never had the destructions with the ones I bought,just thought that the curved bit comes out easier than the straight bit and I'd rather have the bit that comes out easily at the back so should it indeed come out it trails rather than drop and digs in but it really doesn't matter as if they come out either way round usually doesn't end well.
 

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Same here: I've always standardized with the curved bit at the rear, but mainly so I always know which way is which, and I don't break a fingernail or tear the body trying to get the clip out when it doesn't want to!

Never realized the instructions said anything about that.

For any serious racing, I would always (or should...) put a bit of tape on to make sure the clip doesn't fall out!

Don
 
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