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Comrades-

I told a few newer racers that I would post a "how-to" on a simple motor swap for Scalextric Digital. I started doing these conversions 3 years ago when my kids were younger. We still have younger relatives over during the X-Mas holidays, so these cars were used as recently as 2 weeks ago. I have made this modification to about 15 of my impact-resistant Scalextric cars for my digital layout. Here are 13 of them.

Car Automotive parking light Vehicle Land vehicle Tire

The cars seem to run about half speed vs. the original Scalextric cars, which is exactly the speed that is required when you are introducing younger racers to the hobby. That speed is much, much easier for younger (and older) racers to control than the stock 18K Scalextric motor. I know that users can use the Arc Pro app to set each car to different power levels, but sometimes the cars go back to full power after the race has ended. Other times, the kids are impatient and just want to put in some laps before an adult sets up a new race on the app. Separately, I know we can reduce the input power to the powerbase by swapping out the standard 15v power packs for Toshiba laptop packs at 12v. That modification is more subtle than the motor swap. Below 12v input, the digital signals to my lane changers become less predictable on my layout.

Here are the instructions for a standard Scalextric sidewinder conversion. For this project, I like to use a very inexpensive motor available on Amazon from a seller called YEECO. The exact listing is: Yeeco 5PCS 130 DC Motor Mini Electric Motor, DC1.5-12V 5400RPM Carbon Brush High Speed Torque Electric Toy Cars Engine Motor Kit, Electric Machinery Motor with Long Shaft for DIY Fan Toys Cars Models. The cost for 5 motors (today) is $12.69 ($2.53 per motor) and a great price for a motor that you are using for this conversion. I have yet to burn out a YEECO motor and I haven't noticed a huge variance in speed from motor to motor. My intention with this collection of cars was to make each car "equally slow" and these motors have been adequate for the job. The motors themselves are dual shafted, so you can use them for either an inline or a sidewinder configuration. The second slowest motor I have tried is the H&R Racing Jack Rabbit. I really like the Jack Rabbit motor, but these YEECO motors are much weaker (slower) and I mean that in a nice way!

Motor vehicle Font Gas Fixture Screw

Here is a picture of a Scalextric Porsche 997 chassis in stock form before the motor swap.

Game controller Input device Gadget Electronic instrument Video game accessory

Here is a picture of a Scalextric Porsche 997 after the YEECO motor swap. It is the from the red Porsche in the third row on the right from the fleet picture above.

Circuit component Automotive lighting Cable Electrical wiring Gadget

This car in the photo has more modifications that what you need to do. On this car, I had already upgraded the tires to Paul Gage urethanes, upgraded the spur gear to an old (red) Slot.it (part #SIGS1936...important most Scalextric sidewinders take a 19MM spur gear.....the newest version of this gear is purple), upgraded the bushings to Slot Car Corner bronze bushings (part #CP-01000) , and used a brass 11T 6.5MM Slot.it (part # SIPS11) pinion. However, you can make this motor swap without changing anything on the rear axle. You can even pull the original plastic 11T pinion and simply reinstall it on the Yeeco shaft without a pinion puller or pinion press. You may need to put a drop of CA on the shaft after installation, but this motor is "low power" and your chance of spinning the pinion is minimal. You could purchase new Scalextric 11T (part #8200) plastic pinions if want to install something new. They are available in a pack of 4 and cost about $1-2 each. These #8200 pinions are the 6.5mm version for Sidewinders. Scalextric part #8100 is the direct replacement 9T pinion for the inline configuration, but that has a 5.5MM diameter and won't work on a sidewinder. After I install the pinion, I use my Dremel with a cutting wheel to trim the excess shaft. I then remove the excess length of the shaft on the non-pinion side of the motor. The shaft will be sharp after you cut with the dremel wheel, but you can easily smooth it with a file or use a hand tool called a "cup bur" wire rounder.

To remove the motor, you can use a WERA pry bar or a simple screwdriver. You should remove the non-pinion side of the motor first and then carefully remove the pinion side. When you install the new motor, install the pinion side first (slide it in) and then snap in the opposite non-pinion side.

You will need a soldering iron to remove the "ferrite man" from the Scalextric old motor. I have been told that ferrite men are important to leave on the digital cars, so I simply unsolder these from the old motor and then re-solder to the replacement motor. The red wire on Scalextric cars has been the rear (or back) wire on each one of my conversion projects.

It probably took me longer to type and explain this replacement than it will probably take you to change a motor. After you have done a few motors, it will probably take less than 5 minutes (including the time to warm up the soldering iron).

Have fun with your kids and grandkids. Let me know if you have other questions.

Chris
 

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Neat install,
I just get my Scorpius controller, go into the menu and scroll to Speed Limiter, press a button and dial it to any number between 1-100 and press go. Lets start with 50% and go from there.
Or just dial the power supply down to 9V.

I have found the best though, crash and burn,
They get the message very quickly once their car comes off and are forced to watch the other kids have fun until the heat is over.
 

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re member
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Ni ni ni nice one, ChrisH

I havent seen the YEECO motors before so must go look.....I dont need more motors but I would like more motors.

Thanks for the detailed explanation....for most builders cutting the motor shaft will be the most challenging obstacle.
 

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Old Engineer
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here's my 2c

oil the bearings, spin it up on a few Volts (use a dry cell if you must) just so it's spinning a little, put a cutoff disc on a moto tool in the opposite direction to the shaft and do it. round the end of the shaft off to clean things up a little when it's cut off.

some masking tape all over the motor (leave the victim shaft sticking out) will keep the FOD (in this case, flying magnetic dust) out of the rotating parts. wear safety glasses. takes longer to get everything ready than to actually do the ten second job. don't pick up the little cutoff piece until it cools or you'll get a miniature shaft-shaped burn like I did the first time. peel off backwards and remove the tape so as to contain the filings.
 

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*** Leo A Capaldi ***
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Thank you very much for this.

I've been thinking how's the best way to limit the speed of my mini's and Start Rally cars for when my nephews come around.
I like to throw up a simple track up with the 4car powerbase and Digi Lapcounter instead of faffing with the APB and Laptop.
 

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ParrotGod
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Excellent post, Chris.

Just a reminder that many digital systems and RMSs allow for reducing speed/power to a particular driver and/or car (ID).

But sometimes is more convenient to just have the cars ready to go without having to go through menus and clicks or fiddle with controller settings.
 

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ParrotGod
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I usually put the motor in a small plastic bag and push the shaft through before cutting
never thought of this. Usually I put the motor on a small vice and apply power so that the motor shaft is turning while I cut it.
 

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*** Leo A Capaldi ***
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I bought a bunch of these motors via the link in my post above. Excellently slow!

My test car is a 1:32 Range Rover running on a Tamiya Mini 4WD chassis that had a Scalextric Mabuchi S-Can motor (and a guide). With the Scalextric motor it would lap my rally stage on full power (12 volts) in about 32 seconds (a decent slot-car takes about 11 seconds). The gearing of the Mini 4WD chassis is about 35 to 1 so it runs pretty slowly at the best of times. With the 5,400 rpm motor installed and on full power it takes about 143 seconds to do a lap.

So an increase of over 4 times. Doing the maths for a good slot-car, that would take about 50 seconds.
So the new motor revs are slow and it seems to have plenty of torque to make it move quite slowly - steadily at half-throttle.

Perfect for a camera car to showcase a track layout.

Big thanks to ChrisH for the info !!

Brief video available here :-


Leo
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Comrades-

Thank you for the positive feedback and comments about the posting earlier this month. I didn't intend to cause a run on the YEECO motors on Amazon, but someone sent me a note and said they are currently out of stock. I seem to remember a YEECO motor stock shortage about a year ago, but then they suddenly came back in stock again. So, hang in there! If you are need an alternate motor, it looks like there are (at least) a few E-Bay sellers with the exact same yellow-endbell motor with the same 5400 rpm rating. I haven't tried any of these alternate suppliers, but they look suprisingly similar to YEECO and they cost less than $2 each. Just make sure you purchase a motor tagged "double shaft" if you need this for a sidewinder project.

I watched the "slow crawler" video and that was awesome! I should clarify that the YEECO motors aren't actually that slow when you are running standard power! Perhaps I can pursuade my teenagers to show me how to post a video some day so that I can show you how they drive on my 4-lane digital layout. Until then, let me simply add that I would compare these 5400 cars to driving a 1/24th scale "Flexi" on a commercial slot car track. You can probably see on my earlier pictures that I add a healthy amount of lead weight to these cars too. The combination of the weak motor and the extra weight means that you can really push these cars pretty far into a radius 3 or radius 4 corner under a very controllable drift.

I have a healthy number of non-racer friends and family through our house during the year and everyone loves to drive these YEECO cars. I know they will get some use on Sunday before our Super Bowl party begins. I will even get my wife and her girlfriends to join the fun before kickoff. When is the last time you saw 6 ladies having fun racing slot cars? Anyway, I think it is a healthy way to introduce people to our sport.

If you are worried that the YEECO motors are going to be "too slow" for you on your track, go ahead and try the H&R Jack Rabbit (available at most hobby dealers) or the BWA motors (available on E-Bay). They are both 14k and "softer" than the standard Scalextric motors. I noticed there is a Scaleauto 10K motor on the market, but haven't decided if I "need" to try that one too? Would like to hear if anyone has tried that motor for home use?

Enjoy!
 
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