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· Brian Ferguson
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4,318 Posts
If they actually produce sets with only one intended lane change point (per change direction), I will be very disappointed. People like Beppe, Yves, blst, and even myself have shown that LC's can be done with relative ease by home scratchbuilders. If sets don't come with multiple LCs, then where is "the realism" upon which this entire concept is supposedly based? In 1:1 reality, a driver can change lane ANYwhere - I don't expect THAT but I DO expect more than one, or even two!, places per lap where I can change lane! Or am I going to have to buy several add-on packages to achieve this.... and will several of them work on the same layout?

The LC implementation, particularly in sets, may well be what determines the ultimate success or failure of digital in the home market, and thus overall!
 

· Brian Ferguson
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4,318 Posts
QUOTE You are probably looking at an extra 20% cost over analogue but looking at a far higher percentage in terms of adiitional fun.

Must be nice to live over there! That 20% means that sets will cost almost $400 here. I think even Santa will have second thoughts!


As for the additional fun, well.... the jury is still out on that, isn't it? At least in terms of widespread acceptance?


And as for...

QUOTE In my mind these are bargain basement prices and I have a sneeky feeling that Hornby are going to subsidise digital kit for the first year or so of launch to get the consumer hooked. Very good digital marketing on the part of Hornby.

That's a dangerous strategy! It works for new, inexpensive products where the difference is not that great and repeat consumers plus apparent product use influences new buyers, but on items of this price even a 10% increase can prove to be fatal. It can stop a higher priced product dead in it's tracks! I don't think Hornby can rely on a "hooked consumer" market for longevity. It's a small sector and they need to market to the general masses on an ongoing basis. That requires that pricing be kept reasonable, and not temporarily subsidized.

JMO, mind you.
 

· Brian Ferguson
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4,318 Posts
I have to be honest, I still don't understand the preoccupation with concern over collisions and the insistence on electronically controlling the driver's intentions. Perhaps I'm just stupid, but racing etiquette since the 1960's (my introduction) has been that you don't collide with other cars. Just because you have the opportunity to change lanes does not remove that responsibility from you. Neither does the fact that you can travel in the same lane as someone else. Digital racing IS more complex! People have to accept that! Developing artificial ways to stop lane changes will remove a great part of the challenge, inhibit the truly skilled driver who can time things perfectly, and result in unexpected NON-lane-changes!

I say forget the LC-collision concerns and let digital racing just happen. When a piece of electronic gear tells me I can't time a LC to perfection, I don't want to be part of that system. It will sort itself out over time anyway! If people can't drive this stuff, then why do we want it at all?


Just my honest feelings!


And it remains to be seen just how practical it is to continually switch chips between 100's of cars!
 

· Brian Ferguson
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4,318 Posts
Beppe: But isn't that what's going to be released?


On a large track, with skillful drivers (like a club).... no problem!

As for the typical home racer, I'm not putting money on the longevity of digital. Or their willingness to pay for add-ons to an already expensive form of slot racing to turn it into "our" ideal digital form of the hobby. Most of these sets will not be bought by hobbiests in the first place.
 
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